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Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body.

Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy.
Salk scientist Clodagh O'Shea named recipient of grant from Faculty Scholars Program

Salk scientist Clodagh O'Shea named recipient of grant from Faculty Scholars Program

Clodagh O'Shea, an associate professor in the Salk Institute's Molecular and Cell Biology Laboratory, is among the first recipients of a grant from the Faculty Scholars Program, a new partnership of Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Simons Foundation for early career researchers whose work shows the potential for groundbreaking contributions in their fields. [More]
Veracyte announces new data suggesting ability of Afirma GEC in thyroid cancer diagnosis

Veracyte announces new data suggesting ability of Afirma GEC in thyroid cancer diagnosis

Veracyte, Inc.today announced new data suggesting the potential to enhance the performance of the Afirma Gene Expression Classifier in thyroid cancer diagnosis by combining the test's proven RNA expression-based capabilities with gene variant and fusion information – all on a single, robust RNA sequencing platform. [More]
Novartis gets three FDA approvals for expanded use of biologic drug to treat rare autoinflammatory diseases

Novartis gets three FDA approvals for expanded use of biologic drug to treat rare autoinflammatory diseases

Novartis announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has granted three simultaneous approvals for the expanded use of Ilaris (canakinumab) to treat three rare and distinct types of Periodic Fever Syndromes. [More]
Breakthrough research opens door to potential new therapies for inflammatory diseases

Breakthrough research opens door to potential new therapies for inflammatory diseases

Scientists have made a major breakthrough in understanding the workings of the cellular machinery involved in a host of inflammatory diseases. [More]
Antibody drug offers new therapeutic approach for treating AML

Antibody drug offers new therapeutic approach for treating AML

An antibody drug that targets a surface marker on cancer stem cells could offer a promising new therapeutic approach for treating acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a form of blood cancer that affects an estimated 50,000 people in Saudi Arabia. [More]
Multifunctional nanocapsules could enhance drug delivery to specific disease sites

Multifunctional nanocapsules could enhance drug delivery to specific disease sites

A nanoparticle-based drug delivery system that can sense and respond to different conditions in the body, as well as to an externally applied magnetic field, could enhance doctors’ ability to target drugs to specific sites of disease. [More]
British Lung Foundation announces funding for IPF research

British Lung Foundation announces funding for IPF research

Britons are officially three times more likely to die of the incurable lung condition idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), than in a road accident. Despite this, the disease is so unheard of and underfunded in research doctors still don’t know what causes it. [More]
New project receives grant to develop revolutionary bowel cancer surgery tool

New project receives grant to develop revolutionary bowel cancer surgery tool

A project to develop a revolutionary new bowel cancer surgery tool that will enable surgeons to carry out operations with far greater precision than ever before has received £628,000 in funding. [More]
Gastroenterology specialist receives national award for research into feeding tubes

Gastroenterology specialist receives national award for research into feeding tubes

A gastroenterology specialist has won a national award for his research into feeding tubes. Dr Matt Kurien has investigated which patients benefit most from feeding tubes, and provided evidence to help clinicians decide which cases are most suitable. [More]
Scientist develops way to detect BoNT in biological samples

Scientist develops way to detect BoNT in biological samples

Many know Botox as a trendy way to get rid of wrinkles, but the popular drug — made from botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) — can do more than just fill lines. [More]
Study quantifies benefits of healthy city design

Study quantifies benefits of healthy city design

Previous studies have shown a correlation between the design of cities and growing epidemics of injuries and non-communicable diseases such as heart disease, diabetes and cancer. [More]
New global map shines light on genetic roots of diseases

New global map shines light on genetic roots of diseases

A global genetic interaction map is revolutionizing how genes are being studied. A new study, involving University of Minnesota researchers, is no longer looking at genes as loners, but instead as a social network of the body, interacting in groups. The new approach may ultimately change our understanding of the genetic roots of diseases. [More]
Yale researchers compare efficacy of four PD-L1 assay tests

Yale researchers compare efficacy of four PD-L1 assay tests

In a recent study, a Yale Cancer Center team compared the performance of the four available PD-L1 assay tests. [More]
SLU receives HRSA grant for training family physicians and medical family therapists in behavioral health

SLU receives HRSA grant for training family physicians and medical family therapists in behavioral health

Saint Louis University has received a $1.87 million grant to strengthen behavioral health training for family physicians, who often are the primary physician seen by many adults and children, and for medical family therapists who practice alongside them. [More]
Identical twins experience unimaginable cancer

Identical twins experience unimaginable cancer

Since the day they came home from the hospital in matching newborn monkey outfits, Zane and Zac Taylor have done everything together. [More]
Scientists manage to produce first molecular map of genes in the pancreas

Scientists manage to produce first molecular map of genes in the pancreas

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have managed to produce the first molecular map of the genes that are active in the various cells of the human pancreas. [More]
Higher proportion of CKD patients receive renal replacement therapy in the U.S. than other countries

Higher proportion of CKD patients receive renal replacement therapy in the U.S. than other countries

A new study indicates that a much higher proportion of patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD)—even those ≥85 years of age—receive renal replacement therapy (RRT) such as maintenance dialysis or kidney transplantation in the United States than in other developed countries. [More]
Mitochondrial alternative oxidase from sea-squirt shows potential to fight against sepsis

Mitochondrial alternative oxidase from sea-squirt shows potential to fight against sepsis

Mitochondrial alternative oxidase from a sea-squirt works as a safety valve for stressed mitochondria. This property enables it to stop the runaway inflammatory process that leads to multiple organ failure and eventual death in bacterial sepsis. [More]
Scientists discover potential way of stopping most aggressive brain tumour

Scientists discover potential way of stopping most aggressive brain tumour

Researchers from the University of Southampton have discovered a potential way of stopping one of the most aggressive types of brain tumour from spreading, which could lead the way to better patient survival. [More]
DNA damage caused by smoking may last a lifetime

DNA damage caused by smoking may last a lifetime

Results of a study published this week show that the effects of smoking on DNA are wide-reaching and some persist long after a person has stopped smoking. The information gained may help improve our understanding of smoking-related diseases. [More]
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