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Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body.

Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy.
Researchers show how MPO enzyme kills pathogens without collateral tissue damage

Researchers show how MPO enzyme kills pathogens without collateral tissue damage

Researchers from the University of Basel in Switzerland have clarified the role of the enzyme MPO. [More]
Researchers find new way to quantify olfactory sensory neurons using PET radiotracer

Researchers find new way to quantify olfactory sensory neurons using PET radiotracer

Olfactory health - how well we are able to smell - is a reliable marker of the health of the brain, but the "smell identification tests" commonly used in studies of olfactory health do not offer a complete picture of what is happening. [More]
Scientists generate new index to accurately predict presence of fatty liver disease

Scientists generate new index to accurately predict presence of fatty liver disease

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease has become a global epidemic. There is not only a great interest worldwide to understand the causes and consequences of fatty liver disease, but also to diagnose fatty liver disease at an early stage. [More]
Hypertensive disease of pregnancy linked to higher risk for early mortality

Hypertensive disease of pregnancy linked to higher risk for early mortality

In a study to be presented Friday, Jan. 27, in the oral plenary session at 8 a.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting, researchers with University of Utah Health Sciences Center, Intermountain Healthcare and the Huntsman Cancer Institute (all in Salt Lake City, Utah), will present the study, Long-term mortality risk and life expectancy following recurrent hypertensive disease of pregnancy. [More]
Researchers investigate influence of surrounding tissue on formation and growth of tumor cells

Researchers investigate influence of surrounding tissue on formation and growth of tumor cells

Malignant melanoma is the fastest-growing type of cancer and the most fatal skin disease. [More]
Novel noninvasive method precisely tweaks brain activity in rats using ultrasound pulses

Novel noninvasive method precisely tweaks brain activity in rats using ultrasound pulses

Biomedical engineers at Johns Hopkins report they have worked out a noninvasive way to release and deliver concentrated amounts of a drug to the brain of rats in a temporary, localized manner using ultrasound. [More]
Researchers discover mutation hotspots that act like backseat drivers for breast cancer development

Researchers discover mutation hotspots that act like backseat drivers for breast cancer development

Researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute have discovered 'hotspots' of mutations in breast cancer genomes, where mutations thought to be inactive 'passengers' in the genome have now been shown to possibly drive further cancerous changes. [More]
New stem cell method could lead to powerful treatments for skeletal system injuries

New stem cell method could lead to powerful treatments for skeletal system injuries

A recent study, affiliated with UNIST has developed a new method of repairing injured bone using stem cells from human bone marrow and a carbon material with photocatalytic properties, which could lead to powerful treatments for skeletal system injuries, such as fractures or periodontal disease. [More]
Characterizing the brain, cell by cell

Characterizing the brain, cell by cell

My group develops approaches to study cell-to-cell signaling in the brain – how the cells of the brain talk to each other. The brain is heterogeneous, probably more so than any other organ in our body, and many of its functions depend on the unique characteristics of these cells. [More]
New biomarker helps better predict survival after surgical removal of colorectal metastases

New biomarker helps better predict survival after surgical removal of colorectal metastases

Liver metastases are formed from cancer cells that have originated in other organs and migrated to the liver via the bloodstream. Colorectal cancer (cancer of the colon/rectum) can be successfully treated by surgical resection of the metastases in combination with chemotherapy. [More]
A test to evaluate Hepatitis B therapy launched by Quest Diagnostics

A test to evaluate Hepatitis B therapy launched by Quest Diagnostics

Quest Diagnostics, the world’s leading provider of diagnostic information services, today announced the launch of a new test service that helps physicians evaluate a patient’s response to drug therapies used to treat infection with the hepatitis B virus (HBV). The first test of its kind available in the United States, the test is significant because it may help physicians tailor more effective treatments for the up to 2.2 million individuals infected with HBV. [More]
E-cigarettes attracting youth to use tobacco products, new UC San Francisco study finds

E-cigarettes attracting youth to use tobacco products, new UC San Francisco study finds

E-cigarettes - thought by some to be responsible for a decline in youth cigarette smoking - are actually attracting a new population of adolescents who might not otherwise have smoked tobacco products, according to a new UC San Francisco study. [More]
Cervical cancer death rate among older and black women higher than previously thought

Cervical cancer death rate among older and black women higher than previously thought

A woman's risk of dying of cervical cancer is higher than long believed, particularly among older and black women, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health-led research suggests. [More]
SCS therapy can be key to reducing use of opioids in patients battling chronic pain, study finds

SCS therapy can be key to reducing use of opioids in patients battling chronic pain, study finds

New research has found spinal cord stimulation (SCS) therapy can be key to reducing or stabilizing the use of opioids in patients battling chronic pain. [More]
Researchers uncover mechanism of resistance used by triple negative breast cancer

Researchers uncover mechanism of resistance used by triple negative breast cancer

Breast cancer cells are evasive, finding ways to bypass drugs designed to stop their unchecked growth. [More]
STS releases first publicly accessible report of outcomes from lung cancer surgery

STS releases first publicly accessible report of outcomes from lung cancer surgery

The Society of Thoracic Surgeons has released the first publicly accessible national report of outcomes from lobectomy, a lung cancer procedure that removes a portion of the lung. [More]
UC San Diego researchers receive CIRM grants to advance studies on Zika virus and cancer

UC San Diego researchers receive CIRM grants to advance studies on Zika virus and cancer

The Independent Citizens Oversight Committee of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine has approved a pair of $2 million awards to University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers to advance studies of new treatments for Zika virus infections and the use of stem cell-derived natural killer (NK) cells to target ovarian cancer and other malignancies. [More]
Novel approach for imaging immune cell movements identifies initial steps in inflammatory arthritis

Novel approach for imaging immune cell movements identifies initial steps in inflammatory arthritis

Using a novel approach for imaging the movement of immune cells in living animals, researchers from the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Immunology and Inflammatory Diseases have identified what appear to be the initial steps leading to joint inflammation in a model of inflammatory arthritis. [More]
Chemotherapy prior to surgery could improve prognosis in African-American breast cancer patients

Chemotherapy prior to surgery could improve prognosis in African-American breast cancer patients

Administering chemotherapy to African-American breast cancer patients prior to surgery could improve their prognosis and survival rates from the disease, according to a new study. [More]
A quarter of men could safely avoid prostate biopsy if MRI is used

A quarter of men could safely avoid prostate biopsy if MRI is used

Performing an MRI scan of men with suspected prostate cancer could spare a quarter of men from having to undergo prostate biopsy, according to a study published in The Lancet. [More]
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