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Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body.

Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy.
Study explores accuracy of body weight perception and obesity in Chinese Americans

Study explores accuracy of body weight perception and obesity in Chinese Americans

Worldwide, obesity is becoming more prevalent. According to The World Health Organization, worldwide obesity has nearly doubled since 1980, and in 2008 25% of adults aged 20 and over were overweight, and another 11% were obese. Obesity has been identified as a major source of unsustainable health costs and numerous adverse outcomes, including morbidity and mortality due to hypertension, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and certain types of cancer. [More]
Research findings could help guide development of potential treatments for HCV

Research findings could help guide development of potential treatments for HCV

Warring armies use a variety of tactics as they struggle to gain the upper hand. Among their tricks is to attack with a decoy force that occupies the defenders while an unseen force launches a separate attack that the defenders fail to notice. [More]
Autism and apraxia often go hand-in-hand

Autism and apraxia often go hand-in-hand

Some children with autism should undergo ongoing screenings for apraxia, a rare neurological speech disorder, because the two conditions often go hand-in-hand, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. [More]
TSRI scientists awarded $2.2 million NIH grant to advance innovative approach to obesity treatment

TSRI scientists awarded $2.2 million NIH grant to advance innovative approach to obesity treatment

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have been awarded nearly $2.2 million by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health to advance an innovative approach to the treatment of obesity, a serious health problem that affects more than one-third of all Americans. [More]
Congress needs to act to incentivize development of genomic data systems

Congress needs to act to incentivize development of genomic data systems

The latest generation of genomic testing offers a chance for significant improvements in patient care, disease prevention, and possibly even the cost-effectiveness of healthcare, but Congress needs to act to incentivize the development of the massive data systems that doctors and regulators will need in order to make these tests safe and effective for patients. [More]
Earlier antiretroviral treatment benefits HIV-infected individuals

Earlier antiretroviral treatment benefits HIV-infected individuals

A major international randomized clinical trial has found that HIV-infected individuals have a considerably lower risk of developing AIDS or other serious illnesses if they start taking antiretroviral drugs sooner, when their CD4+ T-cell count--a key measure of immune system health--is higher, instead of waiting until the CD4+ cell count drops to lower levels. Together with data from previous studies showing that antiretroviral treatment reduced the risk of HIV transmission to uninfected sexual partners, these findings support offering treatment to everyone with HIV. [More]
Progression of different types of breast cancer influenced differently by tumor microenvironment

Progression of different types of breast cancer influenced differently by tumor microenvironment

Our environment can have a major impact on how we develop, and it turns out it's no different for cancer cells. In work published today in Neoplasia, a team of researchers led by Associate Professor Mikala Egeblad at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory found that two different mouse models of breast cancer progressed differently based on characteristics of the tumor microenvironment - the area of tissue in which the tumor is embedded. [More]
Modest lifestyle changes help breast cancer survivors lose weight

Modest lifestyle changes help breast cancer survivors lose weight

Carrying extra body fat increases the risk for diabetes, heart disease and stroke, and also increases risk of cancer recurrence after a breast cancer diagnosis. A multi-institutional study presented at the American Society for Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting 2015 shows that female breast cancer survivors are able to lose weight through modest lifestyle changes. [More]
Brigatinib drug shows promise against ALK+ non-small cell lung cancer in phase I/II clinical trial

Brigatinib drug shows promise against ALK+ non-small cell lung cancer in phase I/II clinical trial

Phase I/II clinical trial results reported at the American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting 2015 show promising results for investigational drug brigatinib against ALK+ non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), with 58 of 78 ALK+ patients responding to treatment, including 50 of 70 patients who had progressed after previous treatment with crizotinib, the first licensed ALK inhibitor. [More]
UM researcher receives grant to examine effects of CBT on racial/ethnic minority smokers

UM researcher receives grant to examine effects of CBT on racial/ethnic minority smokers

Numerous studies have shown that African Americans and Hispanics are less likely than Caucasians to quit smoking, even if they participate in cessation interventions. [More]
AACR, Bayer partner to expand Basic Cancer Research Fellowship Program for 2015

AACR, Bayer partner to expand Basic Cancer Research Fellowship Program for 2015

The American Association for Cancer Research and Bayer HealthCare are pleased to announce a new partnership that will expand AACR's Basic Cancer Research Fellowship Program for 2015. [More]
Researchers call for improving screening accuracy to reduce false-positive mammograms

Researchers call for improving screening accuracy to reduce false-positive mammograms

The psychological strain of being told that you may have breast cancer may be severe, even if it turns out later to be a false alarm. This is the finding of new research from the University of Copenhagen, which has just been published in the scientific journal Annals of Family Medicine. [More]
Children's National Health System first in U.S. to treat osteoid osteoma using MR-HIFU method

Children's National Health System first in U.S. to treat osteoid osteoma using MR-HIFU method

Doctors from the Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation at Children's National Health System are the first in the United States to treat osteoid osteoma, a benign but painful bone tumor that commonly occurs in children and young adults, using an experimental magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) method. [More]
Strand Life Sciences to launch expanded StrandAdvantage pan-cancer genomic profiling service at ASCO 2015

Strand Life Sciences to launch expanded StrandAdvantage pan-cancer genomic profiling service at ASCO 2015

Strand Life Sciences, a global genomic profiling company that uses next generation sequencing technology to empower cancer care, today announced it will introduce its expanded StrandAdvantage pan-cancer genomic profiling service later this month at the 2015 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting in Chicago. [More]
New genetic models allow for comprehensive analysis of drivers for osteosarcoma

New genetic models allow for comprehensive analysis of drivers for osteosarcoma

New models developed at the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota reveal the genes and pathways that, when altered, can cause osteosarcoma. The information could be used to better target treatments for the often-deadly type of cancer. [More]
Positive clinical data of CytRx's aldoxorubicin to be presented at ASCO 2015

Positive clinical data of CytRx's aldoxorubicin to be presented at ASCO 2015

CytRx Corporation, a biopharmaceutical research and development company specializing in oncology, today announced an upcoming poster presentation regarding its lead drug candidate, aldoxorubicin, at the 2015 American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting, which is being held May 29 - June 2, 2015 in Chicago. [More]
Scorpion venom could kill cancer cells

Scorpion venom could kill cancer cells

When the toxin invades channels in the cells with this disease produces cellular damage until killing them. [More]
Researchers present new program to evaluate clinical relevance of genetic variants

Researchers present new program to evaluate clinical relevance of genetic variants

Millions of genetic variants have been discovered over the last 25 years, but interpreting the clinical impact of the differences in a person's genome remains a major bottleneck in genomic medicine. In a paper published in The New England Journal of Medicine on May 27, a consortium including investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Partners HealthCare present ClinGen, a program to evaluate the clinical relevance of genetic variants for use in precision medicine and research. [More]
Carbon monoxide may actually protect the brain from damage after subarachnoid hemorrhage

Carbon monoxide may actually protect the brain from damage after subarachnoid hemorrhage

Carbon monoxide is known by many as a poisonous gas that causes brain injury and other neurological symptoms, including memory loss and confusion. But a new study led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center suggests the opposite may be true: When administered in small, carefully controlled amounts, carbon monoxide may actually protect the brain from damage following subarachnoid hemorrhage, a devastating stroke that results from bleeding in the brain. [More]
Understanding the antimicrobial action of borrelidin: an interview with Dr Min Guo, TSRI

Understanding the antimicrobial action of borrelidin: an interview with Dr Min Guo, TSRI

Borrelidin is a naturally occurring antibiotic isolated from the Streptomyces species and initially from Streptomyces rochei in 1949. It is called Borrelidin because it was firstly discovered as having anti-Borrelia activity. Borrelia is a type of bacteria... [More]
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