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Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body.

Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy.
Personalis receives CAP accreditation

Personalis receives CAP accreditation

Personalis, Inc., a leading provider of genome-based diagnostics, announced today that its onsite clinical laboratory has received accreditation from the College of American Pathologists (CAP), meeting the highest standard of excellence in clinical laboratory practices. [More]

Researchers examine interaction between alcohol and tobacco in risk of ESCC

The rate of developing esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) nearly doubles in those who both smoke and drink compared to those who only smoke or drink, according to new research published in The American Journal of Gastroenterology. [More]
Study suggests that variant of cell surface protein is ideal target to treat gastric cancer

Study suggests that variant of cell surface protein is ideal target to treat gastric cancer

New study by the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore and National University Hospital Singapore suggests that a variant of a cell surface protein is an ideal target for developing drugs to treat gastric cancer [More]
SIOG, EORTC update expert opinion on managing treatment for aged patients with NSCLC

SIOG, EORTC update expert opinion on managing treatment for aged patients with NSCLC

Half of all patients diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer are 70 years of age or older, yet despite this high percentage, these elderly patients are not well represented in clinical trials. Therefore, the paucity of clinical data has made it difficult to reach evidence based clinical recommendations. [More]
Scientists develop DNA nanodevices that survive body's immune defenses

Scientists develop DNA nanodevices that survive body's immune defenses

It's a familiar trope in science fiction: In enemy territory, activate your cloaking device. And real-world viruses use similar tactics to make themselves invisible to the immune system. [More]

Stronger incentives for medical innovators can reduce health care spending, say researchers

To help rein in massive health care spending, a new RAND study concludes that U.S. policy makers should urgently find ways to incentivize pharmaceutical companies and device makers to develop products that produce more value. [More]
Vaccine against H. pylori infection is within reach

Vaccine against H. pylori infection is within reach

Researchers from the University of Rhode Island are championing a recent breakthrough in the laboratory with hopes it could lead to a vaccine against the pathogen responsible for stomach cancer and to therapeutics for inflammatory diseases. [More]
HOPA Membership Awards winners for 2014 announced at 10th Annual Conference

HOPA Membership Awards winners for 2014 announced at 10th Annual Conference

The Hematology/Oncology Pharmacy Association (HOPA) announced the recipients of the 2014 HOPA Membership Awards at its 10th Annual Conference in March. HOPA Membership Awards recognize members who have shown outstanding achievement in their field. [More]

Novartis to buy Glaxosmithkline's oncology unit

The deal, worth billions, will also see Novartis sell its vaccines unit to Glaxo and partner with Glaxo on their consumer divisions. Novartis also said it will sell its animal health division to Eli Lily. [More]
Anxiety experienced with false-positive mammogram does not negatively impact woman's well-being

Anxiety experienced with false-positive mammogram does not negatively impact woman's well-being

Dartmouth researchers have found that the anxiety experienced with a false-positive mammogram is temporary and does not negatively impact a woman's overall well-being. Their findings are reported in "Consequences of False-Positive Screening Mammograms," which was published online in the April 21, 2014 JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]

Studies identify 2 genes highly associated with IBD

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), a group of chronic inflammatory disorders of the intestine that result in painful and debilitating complications, affects over 1.4 million people in the U.S., and while there are treatments to reduce inflammation for patients, there is no cure. [More]

Symposium focused on Surefire Medical's COSY clinical trial to be held at ECIO meeting

Surefire Medical, Inc. announced that a symposium focused on the Coiling vs. Surefire Infusion System in Y90 (COSY) clinical trial will be held during the European Conference on Interventional Oncology (ECIO) meeting taking place in Berlin, Germany April 23-26. T [More]

Spire Leeds Hospital invests £200,000 in PENTAX Medical’s HD+ endoscopes

Spire Leeds Hospital has invested almost £200,000 in state-of-the-art endoscopy equipment from PENTAX Medical – which will benefit local patients. The extraordinarily high resolution images that the new equipment provides will help enhance the hospital’s detection of diseases, such as cancer, and enable earlier treatment which can improve patient outcomes. [More]
New computational tool identifies undiagnosed illnesses and unknown gene mutations

New computational tool identifies undiagnosed illnesses and unknown gene mutations

A computational tool developed at the University of Utah (U of U) has successfully identified diseases with unknown gene mutations in three separate cases, U of U researchers and their colleagues report in a new study in The American Journal of Human Genetics. [More]

FDA approves Cyramza to treat patients with advanced stomach cancer

Based on results of a clinical trial led by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a molecularly targeted drug as second-line treatment in advanced stomach cancer that has progressed after standard chemotherapy has failed. [More]
IMPAKT breast cancer conference abstracts online

IMPAKT breast cancer conference abstracts online

Xenografts and mathematical modelling; liquid biopsy; nanotechnology; next generation genomics- Science is running fast and the impact of new technologies in the care of patients with breast cancer will be at the core of the sixth edition of the IMPAKT conference on translational research in breast cancer. [More]
University of Utah software successfully identifies diseases with unknown gene mutations in three separate cases

University of Utah software successfully identifies diseases with unknown gene mutations in three separate cases

A computational tool developed at the University of Utah (U of U) has successfully identified diseases with unknown gene mutations in three separate cases, U of U researchers and their colleagues report in a new study in The American Journal of Human Genetics. The software, Phevor (Phenotype Driven Variant Ontological Re-ranking tool), identifies undiagnosed illnesses and unknown gene mutations by analyzing the exomes, or areas of DNA where proteins that code for genes are made, in individual patients and small families. [More]

Neoadjuvant targeted treatment shows feasibility for limited clear-cell RCC

Treating patients with nonmetastatic clear-cell renal cell carcinoma with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor axitinib could not only prevent disease progression, but also shrink tumours before surgery, show the results of a phase II trial. [More]
Surgery promising for non-metastatic RCC with thrombus

Surgery promising for non-metastatic RCC with thrombus

Almost half of patients with non-metastatic renal cell carcinoma who have tumour thrombus above the hepatic veins will survive for 5 years after surgery, indicate study results published in The Journal of Urology. [More]

Sunitinib-related fatigue occurs early then tails off during RCC treatment

Patients beginning sunitinib treatment for advanced renal cell carcinoma should be warned that fatigue is likely to occur early, but that it is unlikely to worsen over the course of treatment, suggest US researchers in Cancer. [More]