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Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body.

Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy.
ABIVAX doses first patient in ABX203 Phase IIb/III trial for treatment of chronic hepatitis B

ABIVAX doses first patient in ABX203 Phase IIb/III trial for treatment of chronic hepatitis B

ABIVAX, a clinical stage biotech company developing and commercialising anti-viral compounds and human vaccines, today announced that it has dosed in New Zealand the first patient in a Phase IIb/III clinical trial of ABX203 which is taking place in several countries of the Asia-Pacific region. [More]
Regeneron announces EU approval of EYLEA (aflibercept) Injection for retinal vascular disease treatment

Regeneron announces EU approval of EYLEA (aflibercept) Injection for retinal vascular disease treatment

Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that EYLEA (aflibercept) Injection has been approved by the European Commission for the treatment of visual impairment due to Macular Edema secondary to Retinal Vein Occlusion (RVO). [More]
UMass Amherst biologist partners with Chinese scientist to develop novel drug platform

UMass Amherst biologist partners with Chinese scientist to develop novel drug platform

Margaret Riley, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and pioneer in fighting antibiotic-resistant bacteria, announced this week that she is partnering with a Chinese scientist to develop a new drug platform, pheromonicins. The Chinese government is committing $400 million per year to support the newly created Pheromonicin Institute of Beijing. [More]
Sleeping more than eight hours a night could increase risk of stroke

Sleeping more than eight hours a night could increase risk of stroke

People who sleep more than eight hours a night may have an increased risk of stroke, according to a new study published in the February 25, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Scientists find new links between inflammation and tissue regeneration

Scientists find new links between inflammation and tissue regeneration

Almost all injuries, even minor skin scratches, trigger an inflammatory response, which provides protection against invading microbes but also turns on regenerative signals needed for healing and injury repair - a process that is generally understood but remains mysterious in its particulars. [More]
Trained navigators can help patients overcome inequities in healthcare system

Trained navigators can help patients overcome inequities in healthcare system

Traversing the healthcare system can be daunting for almost anyone. Add in the many obstacles that low-income uninsured populations face, and it becomes tremendously more difficult. But a new Northwestern Medicine study shows that guidance from trained navigators can help patients overcome healthcare inequities. [More]
U of T Scarborough professor develops new compound that can lead cheaper anti-cancer drugs

U of T Scarborough professor develops new compound that can lead cheaper anti-cancer drugs

A new compound developed at the University of Toronto Scarborough could play an important role in developing cheaper anti-cancer drugs. [More]
Cherenkov Effect can help make radiation therapy safer, more effective for patients with cancer

Cherenkov Effect can help make radiation therapy safer, more effective for patients with cancer

The characteristic blue glow from a nuclear reactor is present in radiation therapy, too. Investigators from Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center, led by Brian W. Pogue, PhD, and PhD candidates Adam K. Glaser and Rongxiao Zhang, published in Physics in Medicine and Biology how the complex parts of the blue light known as the Cherenkov Effect can be measured and used in dosimetry to make therapies safer and more effective. [More]
Scientists discover DNA vaccine that alleviates chronic inflammation in the body

Scientists discover DNA vaccine that alleviates chronic inflammation in the body

An international team of scientists including CureLab Oncology, Inc. (Boston), University of Camerino (Italy), and Boston University have serendipitously discovered a DNA vaccine, which systemically alleviates chronic inflammation in the body. Since osteoporosis is an inflammatory disease, preventive and therapeutic effects of the new vaccine were demonstrated on mouse models with osteoporosis. [More]
Tolero's alvocidib receives EMA orphan drug designation for treatment of AML patients

Tolero's alvocidib receives EMA orphan drug designation for treatment of AML patients

Tolero Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a clinical-stage company developing treatments for serious hematological diseases, today announced that the European Medicines Agency has granted orphan drug designation for alvocidib for the treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). [More]
Scientists use graphene to target, neutralise cancer stem cells

Scientists use graphene to target, neutralise cancer stem cells

University of Manchester scientists have used graphene to target and neutralise cancer stem cells while not harming other cells. [More]
New, first-of-its-kind app helps patients with chronic pain track opioid use

New, first-of-its-kind app helps patients with chronic pain track opioid use

A new, first-of-its-kind app has launched to help patients suffering from chronic pain track their opioid use and measure pain levels to assist with the safe use of opioids. [More]
Smokers who quit early does not qualify for lung cancer screening, say Mayo Clinic researchers

Smokers who quit early does not qualify for lung cancer screening, say Mayo Clinic researchers

A decline in smoking rates may mean that many people who could have benefited from early detection of lung cancer are dying because they don't qualify for low-dose CT scans, according to a group of Mayo Clinic researchers. [More]
AR-V7 status does not affect response to taxane chemotherapy in patients with mCRPC

AR-V7 status does not affect response to taxane chemotherapy in patients with mCRPC

Findings from a small prospective study suggest that androgen receptor V7 (or AR-V7) status does not significantly affect response to taxane chemotherapy in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Treatment outcomes were largely similar for the 17 patients with AR-V7-positive prostate cancer and the 20 patients with AR-V7-negative disease included in this analysis. [More]
Sorafenib, sunitinib provide no benefit to patients with locally advanced kidney cancer

Sorafenib, sunitinib provide no benefit to patients with locally advanced kidney cancer

Findings from a federally funded study suggest that patients with locally advanced kidney cancer should not be treated with either adjuvant (post-surgery) sorafenib or sunitinib. The average period to disease recurrence was similar between those who received sorafenib or sunitinib after surgery (5.6 years) and those treated with placebo (5.7 years). [More]
Researchers develop revolutionary approach to treat drug-resistant tumors

Researchers develop revolutionary approach to treat drug-resistant tumors

In greater than 90 percent of cases in which treatment for metastatic cancer fails, the reason is that the cancer is resistant to the drugs being used. To treat drug-resistant tumors, doctors typically use multiple drugs simultaneously, a practice called combination therapy. [More]
New TAU study may offer hope to people diagnosed with Glioblastoma multiforme

New TAU study may offer hope to people diagnosed with Glioblastoma multiforme

There are no effective available treatments for sufferers of Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most aggressive and devastating form of brain tumor. The disease, always fatal, has a survival rate of only 6-18 months. [More]
Scientists detect new molecule that contributes to development of liver fibrosis

Scientists detect new molecule that contributes to development of liver fibrosis

Liver fibrosis, which is the progressive formation of scar tissue in the liver, is a massive medical problem. An estimated ten percent of the population is affected by liver fibrosis or its corresponding later stage, liver cirrhosis. A variety of causes can lead to liver fibrosis, the most widely recognized ones being alcohol consumption and virus-induced chronic liver inflammation. [More]
Study: Gene variant linked to increased risk of vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy in children

Study: Gene variant linked to increased risk of vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy in children

Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who had a certain gene variant experienced a higher incidence and severity of peripheral neuropathy after receiving treatment with the cancer drug vincristine, according to a study in the February 24 issue of JAMA. [More]
Researchers find that new targeted drugs can attack weak spots in cancer cells

Researchers find that new targeted drugs can attack weak spots in cancer cells

Scientists have identified weak spots in cancer cells that could be targeted and attacked by new precision drugs. [More]