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Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body.

Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy.
Scientists discover how immune system molecule hijacks brain circuit to reduce appetite during illness

Scientists discover how immune system molecule hijacks brain circuit to reduce appetite during illness

Loss of appetite during illness is a common and potentially debilitating phenomenon--in cancer patients, especially, it can even shorten lifespan. [More]
Study shows short-term statin treatment does not benefit heart surgery patients

Study shows short-term statin treatment does not benefit heart surgery patients

Giving daily doses of statins for a few days before and after heart surgery does not prevent heart muscle damage or the development of atrial fibrillation (AF), according to an international clinical trial led by the University of Oxford and funded by the British Heart Foundation. [More]
Patient-physician communication helps improve quality of life for prostate cancer survivors

Patient-physician communication helps improve quality of life for prostate cancer survivors

For prostate cancer patients who had their prostates surgically removed, patient-physician communication was key for helping them cope with their disease and for improving their health-related quality of life. [More]
Enzyme previously thought beneficial could pose threat to developing embryos

Enzyme previously thought beneficial could pose threat to developing embryos

A pair of Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation scientists have discovered that an enzyme previously thought only to be beneficial could, in fact, pose significant danger to developing embryos. The new research could have implications not only for prenatal development but also for treating lymphedema and liver damage resulting from acetaminophen overdose. [More]
Experimental drug ozanimod moderately effective in treatment of ulcerative colitis

Experimental drug ozanimod moderately effective in treatment of ulcerative colitis

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have shown that ozanimod (RPC1063), a novel drug molecule, is moderately effective in the treatment of ulcerative colitis. Results of the Phase II clinical trial will appear in the May 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Study reveals glioblastoma subtypes tend to develop in different regions of the brain

Study reveals glioblastoma subtypes tend to develop in different regions of the brain

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have demonstrated that distinct types of glioblastoma, the most common form of brain cancer in adults, tend to develop in different regions of the brain. This finding provides an explanation for how the same cancer-causing mutation can give rise to different types of brain malignancies. [More]
Human brains constantly make statistical computations to estimate confidence

Human brains constantly make statistical computations to estimate confidence

The directions, which came via cell phone, were a little garbled, but as you understood them: "Turn left at the 3rd light and go straight; the restaurant will be on your right side." Ten minutes ago you made the turn. Still no restaurant in sight. How far will you be willing to drive in the same direction? [More]
Older adults experience greater survival rates after lung cancer surgery

Older adults experience greater survival rates after lung cancer surgery

Patients aged 65 years and older are living longer after lung cancer surgery, and with older people representing a rapidly growing proportion of patients diagnosed with lung cancer, this improved survival is especially significant, according to an article posted online today by The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. [More]
Oophorectomy could increase colorectal cancer risk in both pre- and postmenopausal women

Oophorectomy could increase colorectal cancer risk in both pre- and postmenopausal women

Colorectal cancer may rise in women who have their ovaries removed, according to new research. [More]
Sexually-assaulted women more likely to develop variety of medical conditions

Sexually-assaulted women more likely to develop variety of medical conditions

Researchers have found that a variety of conditions are more common in women before and after sexual assault. [More]
Certain sugars in the body play key role in colitis, colon cancer development

Certain sugars in the body play key role in colitis, colon cancer development

An Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation scientist has discovered that certain sugars produced by the body play an important role in the development of colitis and, ultimately, colon cancer. The new finding could potentially lead to therapies for ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease and colon cancer. [More]
Loyola researchers detect tumor gene that may help predict survival outcomes in mouth cancer patients

Loyola researchers detect tumor gene that may help predict survival outcomes in mouth cancer patients

Loyola researchers have identified a tumor gene that may help to predict survival outcomes in patients with cancer of the mouth and tongue. [More]
Researchers develop computer model to reveal how antibiotic-resistant microbes develop and spread

Researchers develop computer model to reveal how antibiotic-resistant microbes develop and spread

Researchers from the Scientific Research Institute of Physical-Chemical Medicine, MIPT, the company M&S Decisions and the research department of Yandex have built a computer model of the interaction between different bacteria, and between bacteria and the gut wall. [More]
Proton therapy offers new hope to patients with inoperable tumors

Proton therapy offers new hope to patients with inoperable tumors

An enormous high tech machine is providing new hope to patients across the country with inoperable tumors. Proton therapy is a precise radiation technique that reduces the side effects often accompanied by traditional treatment options. Thanks to this remarkable technology, a new proton therapy center at UF Health Cancer Center - Orlando Health is saving the eyesight of a new mother who was diagnosed with a tumor behind her eye during her second trimester of pregnancy. [More]
Bayer-new phase 3 liver cancer data

Bayer-new phase 3 liver cancer data

Bayer has announced that a Phase III trial evaluating its oncology compound Stivarga® (regorafenib) tablets for the treatment of patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has met its primary endpoint of a statistically significant improvement in overall survival. The study, called RESORCE, evaluated the efficacy and safety of regorafenib in patients with HCC whose disease has progressed after treatment with sorafenib. The safety and tolerability were generally consistent with the known profile of regorafenib. Detailed efficacy and safety analyses from this study are expected to be presented at an upcoming scientific congress. [More]
OGT launches Cytocell FISH probes for glial tumours

OGT launches Cytocell FISH probes for glial tumours

Oxford Gene Technology (OGT), The Molecular Genetics Company, has launched its CE-IVD labelled Cytocell Aquarius® 1p36/1q25 and 19q13/19p13 Deletion Probe Kit*, a cost-effective fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) kit for the reliable investigation of glial tumours. [More]
Anaesthesia services given seal of approval by Royal College

Anaesthesia services given seal of approval by Royal College

The quality of anaesthesia services at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals has been recognised with accreditation from the Royal College of Anaesthetists. [More]
University hospital in Finland invests in digital pathology from Sectra

University hospital in Finland invests in digital pathology from Sectra

Kuopio University Hospital will be Finland's first fully digital pathology department following its investment in Sectra's IT solution for efficient storage, review and sharing of digital pathology images. The Diagnostic Imaging Center at Kuopio University Hospital is thereby extending its existing solution for handling radiology images (PACS) to also include pathology images. This enables in-depth cooperation between the hospital's radiologists and pathologists; two of the key functions in effective clinical care. [More]
BMJ experts reveal medical error as third main cause of death in the U.S

BMJ experts reveal medical error as third main cause of death in the U.S

Medical error is the third leading cause of death in the US after heart disease and cancer, say experts in The BMJ today. [More]
Researchers detect five new genes that increase endometrial cancer risk in women

Researchers detect five new genes that increase endometrial cancer risk in women

An international collaboration of researchers has identified five new gene regions that increase a woman's risk of developing endometrial cancer, one of the most common cancers to affect women, taking the number of known gene regions associated with the disease to nine. [More]
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