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Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body.

Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy.
Combination of two plant compounds holds promise in treating colon cancer

Combination of two plant compounds holds promise in treating colon cancer

The combination of two plant compounds that have medicinal properties - curcumin and silymarin - holds promise in treating colon cancer, according Saint Louis University research published in the June 23 issue of the Journal of Cancer. [More]
Study uncovers new drug-gene mutation combinations that can kill cancer cells

Study uncovers new drug-gene mutation combinations that can kill cancer cells

In an effort to expand the number of cancer gene mutations that can be specifically targeted with personalized therapies, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center looked for combinations of mutated genes and drugs that together kill cancer cells. [More]
Scientist develops new method for identifying proteins to build new biologics

Scientist develops new method for identifying proteins to build new biologics

A University of Toronto scientist has developed a new method for identifying the raw ingredients necessary to build 'biologics', a powerful class of medications that has revolutionized treatment of diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and some cancers. [More]
Researchers identify specific pathways involved in development of mucormycosis

Researchers identify specific pathways involved in development of mucormycosis

Research published today in the journal, Nature Communications, provides new insights into the evolution of Mucorales fungi, which cause a fatal infection in ever-increasing segments of patient population, and several molecular pathways that might be exploited as potential therapeutic or diagnostic targets. [More]
Study highlights need to deepen health reforms in China

Study highlights need to deepen health reforms in China

China needs to further reform its health system with a number of critical steps to meet the growing health needs of the population and further control spending increases, despite impressive achievements in healthcare reform and rapid progress toward universal health coverage. [More]
Superficial radiotherapy e-learning portal launched by Xstrahl

Superficial radiotherapy e-learning portal launched by Xstrahl

Xstrahl officially launch the Xstra Learning Portal, an online educational platform providing an invaluable source of information for all clinical personnel treating patients using superficial radiotherapy. The website, formerly known as STEP, was created by leading clinical professionals and Xstrahl, a world leader in radiation therapy. [More]
Blood cancer is associated with considerably higher healthcare costs than other cancers

Blood cancer is associated with considerably higher healthcare costs than other cancers

Health economics studies, published today in The Lancet Haematology, report that the cost of treating blood cancers is twice that for treating other cancers. This is largely because they require more complex treatment regimens that necessitate longer hospital stays. [More]
Researchers unveil engineered protein to suppress cancer-promoting message within cells

Researchers unveil engineered protein to suppress cancer-promoting message within cells

Over a century of research has shined light on the once-murky innards of our cells, from the genes that serve as our "blueprints" to the proteins and other molecules that are our cellular taskmasters. [More]
New study reports strains of chimpanzee-carried SIVs can infect human cells

New study reports strains of chimpanzee-carried SIVs can infect human cells

No one knows exactly how it happened. It may have entered through a cut or bite wound, the blood of a chimpanzee seeping into an exposed fingertip or forearm or foot. [More]
Scientists receive $2.4 million grant to advance stem cell therapy for Parkinson's disease

Scientists receive $2.4 million grant to advance stem cell therapy for Parkinson's disease

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and Scripps Clinic have received a grant of nearly $2.4 million from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine to support safety and quality tests of a potential stem cell therapy for Parkinson's disease. [More]
Researchers identify important therapeutic target for small cell lung cancer

Researchers identify important therapeutic target for small cell lung cancer

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified a protein termed ASCL1 that is essential to the development of small cell lung cancer and that, when deleted in the lungs of mice, prevents the cancer from forming. [More]
Researchers developing and validating model to predict risk for colon cancer in people under 50

Researchers developing and validating model to predict risk for colon cancer in people under 50

While the incidence of colon cancer has been declining in individuals 50 years old and older in the United States, it is steadily rising in those under age 50. With funding from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Thomas F. Imperiale, M.D., a VA and Regenstrief Institute clinician-researcher, is developing and validating a model to predict risk for colon cancer in those under 50 with no family history of the disease. [More]
Key gene controls ability of adult stem cells to regenerate muscle after injury, study finds

Key gene controls ability of adult stem cells to regenerate muscle after injury, study finds

A key gene enables the repair of injured muscle throughout life. This is the finding of a study in mice led by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center and the University of Colorado at Boulder, and published online July 21 in Cell Reports. [More]
ASTRO clinical practice statement outlines recommendations to customize treatment for rectal cancer

ASTRO clinical practice statement outlines recommendations to customize treatment for rectal cancer

The American Society for Radiation Oncology recently issued a new clinical practice statement, "Appropriate Customization of Radiation Therapy for Stage II and III Rectal Cancer: An ASTRO Clinical Practice Statement Using the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method." [More]
New imaging tool may help detect presence of androgen receptor in prostate cancer patients

New imaging tool may help detect presence of androgen receptor in prostate cancer patients

Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in men. Tumor growth is critically regulated by the androgen receptor, and treatment strategies to lower androgens, such as testosterone, are a mainstay of clinical treatment. [More]
Andy Murray becomes brand ambassador for Scotland’s DHI

Andy Murray becomes brand ambassador for Scotland’s DHI

International tennis superstar Andy Murray has teamed up with one of Scotland’s leading innovation centres to highlight the potential of technology to provide more efficient and effective health and care services in the UK and across the world. [More]
Study finds no significant decline in indoor tanning use among school children after under-17 ban

Study finds no significant decline in indoor tanning use among school children after under-17 ban

Research from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and Rutgers School of Public Health shows no significant decline in indoor tanning rates among children under age 17 following a ban on such use in New Jersey enacted in 2013. [More]
Researchers identify genetic causes underlying higher rate of melanoma in men

Researchers identify genetic causes underlying higher rate of melanoma in men

A study led by researchers at Universitat Jaume I de Castellón has identified one of the genetic causes underlying the higher rate of melanoma in men. The results have been published in Biology of Sex Differences. [More]
Bowel Cancer UK conducts two free Colorectal Cancer Study Days for healthcare professionals

Bowel Cancer UK conducts two free Colorectal Cancer Study Days for healthcare professionals

The UK’s leading bowel cancer research charity, Bowel Cancer UK, is holding two Colorectal Cancer Study Days, to provide healthcare professionals with an essential update in prevention, screening, early detection and treatment of colorectal cancer. [More]
GSK and University of Leicester team up to develop novel drugs to treat blood cancer

GSK and University of Leicester team up to develop novel drugs to treat blood cancer

A collaboration between the University of Leicester and global pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline has been established to discover and develop novel medicines to treat aggressive forms of blood cancer. [More]
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