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Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body.

Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy.
Elekta's Flexitron brachytherapy afterloading platform approved in China

Elekta's Flexitron brachytherapy afterloading platform approved in China

Elekta announces that the China Food and Drug Administration has approved Elekta's Flexitron brachytherapy afterloading platform for sale and marketing in China. [More]
Inovio begins hTERT DNA immunotherapy trial in adults with breast, lung and pancreatic cancer

Inovio begins hTERT DNA immunotherapy trial in adults with breast, lung and pancreatic cancer

Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced it has initiated a phase I trial of its hTERT DNA immunotherapy (INO-1400) alone or in combination with Inovio's IL-12 immune activator (INO-9012) in adults with breast, lung, or pancreatic cancer at high risk of relapse after surgery and other cancer treatments. [More]
Two orphan receptor proteins exert fatal double whammy effect against glioblastoma cells

Two orphan receptor proteins exert fatal double whammy effect against glioblastoma cells

Two related proteins exert a lethal double whammy effect against glioblastoma cells when activated with a small molecule, say researchers at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center. [More]
Laparoscopic radical cystectomy can lead to reliable, long-term cancer control

Laparoscopic radical cystectomy can lead to reliable, long-term cancer control

Long-term survival rates following laparoscopic surgery for bladder cancer are comparable to those of open surgery, according to a study published in BJU International. The findings, which come from the largest study to date with long-term follow-up after this type of minimally invasive surgery, indicate that prospective randomized trials comparing these two bladder cancer surgeries are warranted. [More]
Eight researchers to receive 2015 Leibniz Prize

Eight researchers to receive 2015 Leibniz Prize

The new recipients of Germany's most prestigious research funding prize have been announced. In Bonn today, the Joint Committee of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) decided to award the 2015 Leibniz Prize to eight researchers. [More]
Research findings may lead to new treatment strategies for Ewing sarcoma

Research findings may lead to new treatment strategies for Ewing sarcoma

The genetic abnormality that drives the bone cancer Ewing sarcoma operates through two distinct processes - both activating genes that stimulate tumor growth and suppressing those that should keep cancer from developing. These findings by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators, published in the November issue of Cancer Cell, may lead to new therapies targeting these aberrant mechanisms. [More]
Sugar-based molecular microcapsule eliminates toxicity of anticancer agent

Sugar-based molecular microcapsule eliminates toxicity of anticancer agent

Johns Hopkins researchers have developed a sugar-based molecular microcapsule that eliminates the toxicity of an anticancer agent developed a decade ago at Johns Hopkins, called 3-bromopyruvate, or 3BrPA, in studies of mice with implants of human pancreatic cancer tissue. The encapsulated drug packed a potent anticancer punch, stopping the progression of tumors in the mice, but without the usual toxic effects. [More]
Survey highlights need for increased public education on benefits of lung cancer screening in France

Survey highlights need for increased public education on benefits of lung cancer screening in France

A prospective nationwide survey on perceptions of lung cancer in the general population of France highlights a need for increased public education on the benefits of lung cancer screening, the good survival rates of early-stage disease and the improved outcomes with new therapeutic strategies, including targeted-therapies. [More]

University Hospital Bonn to validate accuracy of VolitionRx’s Nucleosomics technology in lung cancer

VolitionRx Limited, a life sciences company focused on developing diagnostic tests for cancer and other conditions, today announced that the University Hospital Bonn in Germany will initiate a clinical confirmatory study to assess VolitionRx’s proprietary Nucleosomics platform technology for the diagnosis of lung cancer through a blood test in individuals. [More]
More open discussions needed when referring patients for cancer investigation, study says

More open discussions needed when referring patients for cancer investigation, study says

GPs should consider a more overt discussion with patients when referring them for further investigation of symptoms which may indicate cancer, according to a paper published in the British Journal of General Practice. [More]
New study identifies how SNAIL gene helps cancer cells break free from primary tumor

New study identifies how SNAIL gene helps cancer cells break free from primary tumor

More than 90 percent of cancer-related deaths are caused by the spread of cancer cells from their primary tumor site to other areas of the body. A new study has identified how one important gene helps cancer cells break free from the primary tumor. [More]
Researchers identify a single protein as root cause of multiple allergic reactions

Researchers identify a single protein as root cause of multiple allergic reactions

Johns Hopkins and University of Alberta researchers have identified a single protein as the root of painful and dangerous allergic reactions to a range of medications and other substances. If a new drug can be found that targets the problematic protein, they say, it could help smooth treatment for patients with conditions ranging from prostate cancer to diabetes to HIV [More]
Scientists produce novel class of molecules that could help combat cancer, other diseases

Scientists produce novel class of molecules that could help combat cancer, other diseases

Promising treatments known as biologics are on the market and under development for many serious illnesses such as cancer, but some of them come with high risks, even lethal ones. Now scientists have produced a novel class of molecules that could be as effective but without the dangerous side effects. [More]
Diabetes drug can boost efficacy of TB medication without causing drug resistance

Diabetes drug can boost efficacy of TB medication without causing drug resistance

A more effective treatment for tuberculosis (TB) could soon be available as scientists have discovered that Metformin (MET), a drug for treating diabetes, can also be used to boost the efficacy of TB medication without inducing drug resistance. [More]
UCLA researchers develop lens-free microscope that can detect cancer, other cell-level abnormalities

UCLA researchers develop lens-free microscope that can detect cancer, other cell-level abnormalities

UCLA researchers have developed a lens-free microscope that can be used to detect the presence of cancer or other cell-level abnormalities with the same accuracy as larger and more expensive optical microscopes. [More]
Researchers find new 'sliding scale' model to rule out blood clots in lungs

Researchers find new 'sliding scale' model to rule out blood clots in lungs

Researchers from Intermountain Medical Center in Salt Lake City have identified a new "sliding scale" model used to rule out potentially deadly blood clots in the lungs, known as pulmonary embolisms, that is more accurate than current diagnostic methods. [More]
Researchers identify 53 existing drugs that may block Ebola virus from entering human cells

Researchers identify 53 existing drugs that may block Ebola virus from entering human cells

Researchers found 53 existing drugs that may keep the Ebola virus from entering human cells, a key step in the process of infection, according to a study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the National Institutes of Health, and published today in the Nature Press journal Emerging Microbes and Infections. [More]
Researchers gain new insight into how motor neurons in the brain die during ALS

Researchers gain new insight into how motor neurons in the brain die during ALS

Researchers look to understand the causes of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), in the hope of finding new ways to treat the disease. A new study published online today (December 17th) in the Cell Press journal Neuron shows that a common gene mutation in ALS generates a deadly protein that may cause the damage in the brain that leads to ALS. [More]
Postop chemotherapy supported for stage III NSCLC

Postop chemotherapy supported for stage III NSCLC

Study findings challenge the belief that preoperative chemotherapy is superior to postoperative chemotherapy for patients with clinical stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. [More]
Real-time radiation-exposure feedback can help medical workers adopt safer radiation practices

Real-time radiation-exposure feedback can help medical workers adopt safer radiation practices

It's a sound that saves. A "real-time" radiation monitor that alerts by beeping in response to radiation exposure during cardiac-catheterization procedures significantly reduces the amount of exposure that medical workers receive, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers found. [More]