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Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body.

Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy.
Longer looks: Lithium in the water; controlling cancer; recovering from brain injury

Longer looks: Lithium in the water; controlling cancer; recovering from brain injury

There are many kinds of cancer, but treatments have typically combatted them in one way only: by attempting to destroy the cancerous cells. Surgery aims to remove the entire growth from the body; chemotherapy drugs are toxic to the cancer cells; radiation generates toxic molecules that break up the cancer cells' DNA and proteins, causing their demise. [More]
Genetic testing for breast cancer doubled due to 'Angelina Jolie effect'

Genetic testing for breast cancer doubled due to 'Angelina Jolie effect'

In May 2013 Angelina Jolie, who was then Hollywood's highest-paid actress, underwent a double mastectomy after testing positive for a BRCA1 gene mutation that significantly increases the risk of developing breast cancer. A recent study, published by Breast Cancer Research has found that, public knowledge of her decision doubled NHS referrals for genetic testing for breast cancer risk. [More]
Two young Egyptian scientists at TUM win ISS project

Two young Egyptian scientists at TUM win ISS project

Two researchers at Technische Universit-t M-nchen have won the 'International Space Station Research Competition' with their project 'Egypt Against Hepatitis C Virus.' As their prize, the scientists will see the International Space Station crew perform experiments on the space station. [More]
LSU Health researchers reveal how Chop plays crucial role to combat cancer

LSU Health researchers reveal how Chop plays crucial role to combat cancer

Research led by Paulo Rodriguez, PhD, an assistant research professor of Microbiology, Immunology & Parasitology at LSU Health New Orleans' Stanley S. Scott Cancer Center, has identified the crucial role an inflammatory protein known as Chop plays in the body's ability to fight cancer. [More]
Exercise may have added benefit for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy: Study

Exercise may have added benefit for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy: Study

Study after study has proven it true: exercise is good for you. But new research from University of Pennsylvania scientists suggests that exercise may have an added benefit for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. [More]
Penn Medicine, Wistar Institute awarded NCI grants for four new melanoma research projects

Penn Medicine, Wistar Institute awarded NCI grants for four new melanoma research projects

Penn Medicine and The Wistar Institute have been awarded a prestigious $12.1 million SPORE grant from the National Cancer Institute. The five-year Specialized Programs of Research Excellence, or SPORE, grant will fund four new melanoma research projects that aim to translate fundamental laboratory discoveries into new therapeutics to treat melanoma and other skin cancers. [More]
Viewpoints: Election victory could bring difficult decisions for GOP; Burwell 'presses reset'

Viewpoints: Election victory could bring difficult decisions for GOP; Burwell 'presses reset'

But if the GOP controls both the Senate and the House, its members will be under pressure to govern. At least in the Senate, where 60 votes are needed to move major legislation, they'll even have an incentive to compromise .… But that won't be easy. [More]
State highlights: Report: Hospitals ill-prepared for Sandy; Iowa Supreme Court lets teleabortion go on while it decides

State highlights: Report: Hospitals ill-prepared for Sandy; Iowa Supreme Court lets teleabortion go on while it decides

When Superstorm Sandy slammed into the Northeast nearly two years ago, hospitals found themselves dealing with surges in patients, lost power supplies and employees who couldn't get to work -- problems that a new federal report finds they were not prepared to handle (Mulvihill, 9/17). [More]
New approach to imaging metastatic tumors

New approach to imaging metastatic tumors

Bioluminescence, nanoparticles, gene manipulation - these sound like the ideas of a science fiction writer, but, in fact, they are components of an exciting new approach to imaging local and metastatic tumors. [More]
Scientists find 23 new genetic variants that increase risk for prostate cancer

Scientists find 23 new genetic variants that increase risk for prostate cancer

In an analysis of genetic information among more than 87,000 men, a global team of scientists says it has found 23 new genetic variants - common differences in the genetic code -- that increase a man's risk for prostate cancer. The so-called "meta-analysis," believed to be the largest of its kind, has revealed once hidden mutations among men in a broad array of ethnic groups comprising men of European, African, Japanese and Latino ancestry. [More]
TSRI scientists devise new vancomycin-based antibiotic to rout resistant bacteria

TSRI scientists devise new vancomycin-based antibiotic to rout resistant bacteria

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have devised a new antibiotic based on vancomycin that is powerfully effective against vancomycin-resistant strains of MRSA and other disease-causing bacteria. [More]
Sigma-Aldrich enters into new gene editing partnership with U-M Medical School's Vector Core

Sigma-Aldrich enters into new gene editing partnership with U-M Medical School's Vector Core

Sigma-Aldrich Corporation announced today it has entered into a new gene editing partnership with the University of Michigan Medical School's Vector Core. Under the partnership, Sigma-Aldrich will provide the Vector Core with Sigma CRISPR technology, experimental design consultation, and dedicated gene editing bioinformaticians. [More]
Immune begins bertilimumab Phase II clinical trial for treatment of ulcerative colitis

Immune begins bertilimumab Phase II clinical trial for treatment of ulcerative colitis

Immune Pharmaceuticals Inc. announces today that it has initiated the screening of patients for a Phase II proof of concept clinical trial exploring the safety and efficacy of bertilimumab in the treatment of ulcerative colitis (UC). [More]
Study uncovers new genetic risk factor for deadly skin cancer

Study uncovers new genetic risk factor for deadly skin cancer

Buffers that guard against damage to the ends of chromosomes could hold the key to a better understanding of malignant melanoma - the deadliest form of skin cancer - according to new research from the University of Leeds. [More]
Disrupting cancer regulator MYC: an interview with Professor Kim Janda

Disrupting cancer regulator MYC: an interview with Professor Kim Janda

MYC is an oncogenic member of the basic helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper transcription factor family. In its monomeric form, MYC’s tertiary structure is intrinsically disordered and the protein is transcriptionally inactive. [More]
Ramucirumab effective second-line option for NSCLC

Ramucirumab effective second-line option for NSCLC

The monoclonal antibody ramucirumab, when added to second-line docetaxel, significantly improves the overall survival of patients with stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer, show the findings of the REVEL trial. [More]
Survival benefits with erlotinib plus bevacizumab in EGFR-Mutated NSCLC

Survival benefits with erlotinib plus bevacizumab in EGFR-Mutated NSCLC

Combining erlotinib with bevacizumab could prolong progression-free survival in patients being treated for epidermal growth factor receptor-mutated non-small-cell lung cancer, phase II trial results suggest. [More]
S-1 plus radiotherapy shows promise in elderly NSCLC patients

S-1 plus radiotherapy shows promise in elderly NSCLC patients

Concurrent administration of S-1 chemotherapy and radiotherapy has a favourable impact on survival in elderly patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, a phase II trial has found. [More]
Lobectomy and segmentectomy have similar efficacy in stage I NSCLC

Lobectomy and segmentectomy have similar efficacy in stage I NSCLC

Lobectomy and anatomic segmentectomy appear to offer similar perioperative and oncological outcomes in patients with stage I non-small-cell lung cancer, analysis suggests. [More]
ICO-IDIBELL researchers identify 5 genes differentially expressed in colorectal tumors

ICO-IDIBELL researchers identify 5 genes differentially expressed in colorectal tumors

Researchers at the Catalan Institute of Oncology-Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute, led by David Garcia-Mollev- have identified 5 genes differentially expressed in normal accompanying cells in colorectal tumors. [More]