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Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body.

Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy.
New FDA-approved drug helps patients fight against late-stage cancer

New FDA-approved drug helps patients fight against late-stage cancer

A new drug has been approved by the FDA in the fight against lung cancer. Tecentriq is being used by patients like Cornelius Bresnan, who had late-stage cancer. [More]
New treatment prevents chemotherapy-induced hearing loss in children with cancer

New treatment prevents chemotherapy-induced hearing loss in children with cancer

Investigators from Children's Hospital Los Angeles and 37 other Children's Oncology Group hospitals in the U.S. and Canada have determined that sodium thiosulfate prevents cisplatin-induced hearing loss in children and adolescents with cancer. [More]
Researchers show how microRNAs play key role in tumor progression and response to radiation

Researchers show how microRNAs play key role in tumor progression and response to radiation

OHSU researcher Sudarshan Anand, Ph.D., has a contemporary analogy to describe microRNA: "I sometimes compare MicroRNA to tweets -- they're short, transient and constantly changing." [More]
Latina women with breast cancer likely to experience many gaps in survivorship care, research suggests

Latina women with breast cancer likely to experience many gaps in survivorship care, research suggests

Breast cancer patients in one of the United States' largest and fastest-growing ethnic minority groups are likely to experience numerous gaps in care following their primary treatment, research from Oregon State University suggests. [More]
Research shows link between psychological well-being and physical activity in older adults

Research shows link between psychological well-being and physical activity in older adults

In a paper just published by researchers at Chapman University, findings showed associations between psychological well-being and physical activity in adults ages 50 and older. [More]
Novel imaging agent can rapidly and accurately detect metastasis of prostate cancer

Novel imaging agent can rapidly and accurately detect metastasis of prostate cancer

New research demonstrates that a novel imaging agent can quickly and accurately detect metastasis of prostate cancer, even in areas where detection has previously been difficult. [More]
Eindhoven researchers develop patient-friendly method to determine severity of heart failure

Eindhoven researchers develop patient-friendly method to determine severity of heart failure

Methods currently employed to determine the severity of a heart failure are very limited. Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology and the Catharina Hospital in Eindhoven have therefore developed a method that is very quick, non-invasive, cost-effective and can be performed at the hospital bedside. [More]
Philips pathology services recognised as big contributor to cancer research

Philips pathology services recognised as big contributor to cancer research

Royal Philips (NYSE: PHG, AEX: PHIA) today commented on a recent report of Cancer Research UK (CRUK), which indicates that innovations, such as digital pathology, image measurement and digital collaboration are recommended to avert major gaps in UK pathology services in the near future. [More]
New optical fibre probe can help surgeons detect breast cancer tissue during surgery

New optical fibre probe can help surgeons detect breast cancer tissue during surgery

Working with excised breast cancer tissue, researchers from the University of Adelaide developed the device to differentiate cancerous cells from healthy ones. [More]
Applying quantitative microscopy to live cells

Applying quantitative microscopy to live cells

Microscopy's got a long history. It was developed about 350 years ago for scientists to visualize things they could discern, but not describe. The two pioneers of microscopy were Antoine van Leeuwenhoek, who developed the first microscope and soon after the renowned scientist, Robert Hooke. [More]
Scientists devise new radiation-free probe for imaging molecules in the brain

Scientists devise new radiation-free probe for imaging molecules in the brain

Scientists hoping to get a glimpse of molecules that control brain activity have devised a new probe that allows them to image these molecules without using any chemical or radioactive labels. [More]
Four weeks of prehabilitation may help cancer patients to get in shape for surgery, study suggests

Four weeks of prehabilitation may help cancer patients to get in shape for surgery, study suggests

Just four weeks of prehabilitation may be enough to help some cancer patients get in shape for surgery. [More]
Hallucinogenic drug offers relief for people with cancer-related anxiety or depression

Hallucinogenic drug offers relief for people with cancer-related anxiety or depression

In a small double-blind study, Johns Hopkins researchers report that a substantial majority of people suffering cancer-related anxiety or depression found considerable relief for up to six months from a single large dose of psilocybin -- the active compound in hallucinogenic "magic mushrooms." [More]
Reseachers identify cellular ‘off’ switch for inflammatory immune response in asthma attacks

Reseachers identify cellular ‘off’ switch for inflammatory immune response in asthma attacks

Working with human immune cells in the laboratory, Johns Hopkins researchers report they have identified a critical cellular "off" switch for the inflammatory immune response that contributes to lung-constricting asthma attacks. [More]
New UGA research finds pathogen's motility activates immune response

New UGA research finds pathogen's motility activates immune response

Until now, a pathogen's ability to move through the body has been overlooked as a possible trigger of immune response, but new research from the University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine found that motility will indeed alarm the host and activate an immune response. [More]
UC San Diego scientists reveal surprising role for Hippo pathway in subduing tumor immunogenicity

UC San Diego scientists reveal surprising role for Hippo pathway in subduing tumor immunogenicity

Previous studies identified the Hippo pathway kinases LATS1/2 as a tumor suppressor, but new research led by University of California San Diego School of Medicine scientists reveals a surprising role for these enzymes in subduing cancer immunity. The findings, published in Cell on December 1, could have a clinical role in improving efficiency of immunotherapy drugs. [More]
Scientists discover unique genomic changes integral to testicular cancer development

Scientists discover unique genomic changes integral to testicular cancer development

Researchers led by scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute say they have identified unique genomic changes that may be integral to testicular cancer development and explain why the great majority are highly curable with chemotherapy - unlike most solid tumors. [More]
Scientists discover molecular link between rare childhood genetic disease and major cancer gene

Scientists discover molecular link between rare childhood genetic disease and major cancer gene

A team of researchers led by a University of Rhode Island scientist has discovered an important molecular link between a rare childhood genetic disease, Fanconi anemia, and a major cancer gene called PTEN. [More]
Protective barrier inside chromosomes helps prevent errors during cell division, study finds

Protective barrier inside chromosomes helps prevent errors during cell division, study finds

Fresh insights into the structures that contain our genetic material could explain how the body's cells stay healthy. [More]
Study suggests new approach to treat white blood cells of sepsis patients

Study suggests new approach to treat white blood cells of sepsis patients

New research findings published in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology, suggest that treating the white blood cells of sepsis patients with antibodies that block programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) and programmed cell death ligand (PD-L1) molecules may restore their function and ultimately their ability to eradicate deadly bacteria. [More]
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