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Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body.

Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy.
Study identifies H3.3 protein as key regulator in cellular senescence

Study identifies H3.3 protein as key regulator in cellular senescence

Changes to the structure of the protein histone H3.3 may play a key role in silencing genes that regulate cancer cell growth, according to a study led by researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published online this month in the journal Nature Communications. [More]
Study highlights potential benefit of follow-up screening for woman with early breast cancer

Study highlights potential benefit of follow-up screening for woman with early breast cancer

Public health researchers from the University of Adelaide have evaluated international breast cancer guidelines, finding that there is potential to improve surveillance of breast cancer survivors from both a patient and health system perspective. [More]
20th annual edition of NCCN Guidelines for Prostate Cancer published

20th annual edition of NCCN Guidelines for Prostate Cancer published

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network has published the 20th annual edition of the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Prostate Cancer—one of the eight original NCCN Guidelines published in November 1996. [More]
Higher Medicaid reimbursements for routine office visits linked to more cancer screening tests

Higher Medicaid reimbursements for routine office visits linked to more cancer screening tests

Medicaid reimbursements for office visits to the doctor and for cancer screening tests vary substantially from state to state. New research in the journal Cancer finds that Medicaid recipients are more likely to receive cancer screening tests when their doctors receive higher reimbursements for routine office visits. In contrast, increased reimbursement rates for screening tests do not have a uniform effect on whether Medicaid beneficiaries get screened. [More]
Next-generation biomarker detects tumour cells, delivers anti-cancer drugs

Next-generation biomarker detects tumour cells, delivers anti-cancer drugs

Nanyang Technological University in Singapore has invented a unique biomarker with two exceptional functions. [More]
Researchers discover why only some patients respond to ipilimumab drug

Researchers discover why only some patients respond to ipilimumab drug

A collaborative team of leaders in the field of cancer immunology from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center has made a key discovery that advances the understanding of why some patients respond to ipilimumab, an immunotherapy drug, while others do not. MSK was at the forefront of the clinical research that brought this CTLA-4 blocking antibody to melanoma patients. [More]
Research paves way for improving efficacy of ALS treatement

Research paves way for improving efficacy of ALS treatement

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is a neurodegenerative disease that primarily kills motor neurons, leading to paralysis and death 2 to 5 years from diagnosis. Currently ALS has no cure. Despite promising early-stage research, the majority of drugs in development for ALS have failed. Now researchers have uncovered a possible explanation. [More]
Study provides estimates of obesity-attributable costs of absenteeism among U.S. workers

Study provides estimates of obesity-attributable costs of absenteeism among U.S. workers

A study conducted by researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health shows that obesity costs the U.S. $8.65 billion per year as a result of absenteeism in the workplace --more than 9% of all absenteeism costs. [More]
Research shows that immune checkpoint inhibitors may work in glioblastoma, brain metastases

Research shows that immune checkpoint inhibitors may work in glioblastoma, brain metastases

New evidence that immune checkpoint inhibitors may work in glioblastoma and brain metastases was presented today by Dr Anna Sophie Berghoff at the ESMO Symposium on Immuno-Oncology 2014 in Geneva, Switzerland. [More]
UCLA creates largest-ever protein that self-assembles into molecular 'cage'

UCLA creates largest-ever protein that self-assembles into molecular 'cage'

UCLA biochemists have created the largest-ever protein that self-assembles into a molecular "cage." The research could lead to synthetic vaccines that protect people from the flu, HIV and other diseases. [More]
BIDMC's George Tsokos receives two prestigious awards at 2014 ACR Annual Scientific Meeting

BIDMC's George Tsokos receives two prestigious awards at 2014 ACR Annual Scientific Meeting

George Tsokos, MD, Chief of Rheumatology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and a national leader in the field of lupus research was honored by both the Lupus Foundation of America and the American College of Rheumatology with two prestigious awards presented during the 2014 ACR Annual Scientific Meeting recently held in Boston. [More]
Researchers examine genomic landscapes of humans and mice

Researchers examine genomic landscapes of humans and mice

Looking across evolutionary time and the genomic landscapes of humans and mice, an international group of researchers has found powerful clues to why certain processes and systems in the mouse - such as the immune system, metabolism and stress response - are so different from those in people. Building on years of mouse and gene regulation studies, they have developed a resource that can help scientists better understand how similarities and differences between mice and humans are written in their genomes. [More]
Hydroxyurea therapy offers safe, effective disease management of SCA

Hydroxyurea therapy offers safe, effective disease management of SCA

Conclusive data show that hydroxyurea therapy offers safe and effective disease management of sickle cell anemia (SCA) and reduces the risk of stroke, prompting early termination by the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute of a key clinical trial studying the drug's efficacy. [More]
Endocrine Society issues Clinical Practice Guideline on rare bone condition

Endocrine Society issues Clinical Practice Guideline on rare bone condition

The Endocrine Society today issued a Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG) for the diagnosis and treatment of Paget's disease of the bone, a condition where one or more bones in the body become oversized and weak. [More]
New drug shows promise against treatment-resistant non-small cell lung cancer

New drug shows promise against treatment-resistant non-small cell lung cancer

A new drug that targets not only common cancer-causing genetic mutations in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but also a form of the mutation that causes resistance to treatment, has shown promising results in patients in a phase I/II clinical trial. [More]
Digoxin drug associated with higher risk of death, hospitalization among adults with atrial fibrillation

Digoxin drug associated with higher risk of death, hospitalization among adults with atrial fibrillation

Digoxin, a drug commonly used to treat heart conditions, was associated with a 71 percent higher risk of death and a 63 percent higher risk of hospitalization among adults with diagnosed atrial fibrillation and no evidence of heart failure, according to a Kaiser Permanente study that appears in the current online issue of Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology. [More]
2014 Canadian Prix Galien for Innovative Product Award presented to Esbriet (pirfenidone)

2014 Canadian Prix Galien for Innovative Product Award presented to Esbriet (pirfenidone)

This year's prestigious Canadian Prix Galien for Innovative Product Award has been presented to Esbriet (pirfenidone), a medicine used to treat idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). It is the only medication approved in Canada with a specific IPF indication and is approved for mild to moderate IPF in adults. [More]
Study sheds light on how HIV medications cause significant damage to fetal hearts

Study sheds light on how HIV medications cause significant damage to fetal hearts

A study by a Wayne State University and Children's Hospital of Michigan, Detroit Medical Center research team is shedding new light on the troubling question of whether the drugs often given to HIV-positive pregnant women can cause significant long-term heart problems for the non-HIV-infected babies they carry. [More]
Women with symptoms of serious psychological distress less likely to receive routine cancer screenings

Women with symptoms of serious psychological distress less likely to receive routine cancer screenings

Women with symptoms of serious mental illness are significantly less likely to receive three routine cancer screenings - Pap tests, mammograms and clinical breast exams - than women in the general population, despite being at elevated risk for medical comorbidities and early death, a new study indicates. [More]
EDDA Technology to introduce IQQA-BodyImaging, cloud-based OnDemand service at RSNA 2014

EDDA Technology to introduce IQQA-BodyImaging, cloud-based OnDemand service at RSNA 2014

EDDA Technology, a global leading provider in advanced real-time interactive quantitative imaging solutions, announced today that the company has received FDA clearance on IQQA-BodyImaging. [More]