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Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body.

Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy.
Study supports need for diagnostic analysis of germline and tumor biomarker information

Study supports need for diagnostic analysis of germline and tumor biomarker information

A core tenet of precision medicine is that predictive biomarkers can enhance therapeutic decision-making. In a new pilot study, scientists at Molecular Health analyzed a randomly selected set of 250 patients with solid tumors and detected predictive biomarkers in more than 85% of tumors. [More]
Telesta submits Biologics License Application for MCNA to FDA

Telesta submits Biologics License Application for MCNA to FDA

Telesta Therapeutics Inc. announced today that it has submitted electronically, through its U.S. agent, a Biologics License Application (BLA) to the United States Food and Drug Administration for MCNA. MCNA is Telesta's novel biologic immunotherapeutic for the treatment of high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer patients who have failed first-line BCG therapy. [More]
dlDNA marks progression of HBV-related liver disease

dlDNA marks progression of HBV-related liver disease

The level of serum duplex-linear DNA increases markedly with liver disease progression and development of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, suggests research published in Gut. [More]
STIOLTO RESPIMAT Inhalation Spray now available for treatment of COPD across the U.S.

STIOLTO RESPIMAT Inhalation Spray now available for treatment of COPD across the U.S.

Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced today that STIOLTO RESPIMAT (tiotropium bromide and olodaterol) Inhalation Spray is now available by prescription at pharmacies across the United States. [More]
Indian hospital treats 10,000th patient using RapidArc radiotherapy technology

Indian hospital treats 10,000th patient using RapidArc radiotherapy technology

A three-year-old baby girl with a brain tumor has become the 10,000th patient at Yashoda Hospital in Hyderabad, India to be treated using RapidArc radiotherapy technology from Varian Medical Systems. [More]
Aeterna Zentaris recruits patients for ZoptEC Phase 3 study in women with advanced endometrial cancer

Aeterna Zentaris recruits patients for ZoptEC Phase 3 study in women with advanced endometrial cancer

Aeterna Zentaris Inc. today announced it has reached its goal of recruiting 500 patients for its pivotal Phase 3 ZoptEC (Zoptarelin Doxorubicin in Endometrial Cancer) clinical study with zoptarelin doxorubicin in women with advanced, recurrent or metastatic endometrial cancer. [More]
Patient-reported feedback on health system performance

Patient-reported feedback on health system performance

Patients care about how well pain, nausea, or treatment side effects are managed when evaluating the quality of the medical care they receive, but information about these experiences is not generally collected. To incorporate the values that patients care most about into formal assessments of provider and health system performance, a UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researcher led an expert panel to create a playbook on how to best develop, analyze and use patient-focused measures. [More]
New York Blue Light Symposium highlights three measures to counter consequences of artificial illumination

New York Blue Light Symposium highlights three measures to counter consequences of artificial illumination

The New York Blue Light Symposium convened in New York from June 26-27, 2015. The event was sponsored by the International Blue Light Society (Senior Representative: Kazuo Tsubota), which was founded to research and release findings on the effects of blue light on the human body. [More]
Ebola outbreak: Shaping new strategies to improve health care among rural Liberians

Ebola outbreak: Shaping new strategies to improve health care among rural Liberians

As Liberia rebuilds a health care system decimated by the 2014 Ebola outbreak, understanding precisely how far citizens live from health facilities and its impact on seeking care can help shape new strategies to improve health care delivery and reduce geographic disparities. [More]
Bacterial ‘fight club’ approach effective for finding new drugs from natural sources

Bacterial ‘fight club’ approach effective for finding new drugs from natural sources

Creating bacterial "fight clubs" is an effective way to find new drugs from natural sources. That is the conclusion of a team of Vanderbilt chemists who have been exploring ways to get bacteria to produce biologically active chemicals that they normally hold in reserve. These compounds are called secondary metabolites. [More]
New species of tRNA-derived small RNAs contribute to cell proliferation in cancer

New species of tRNA-derived small RNAs contribute to cell proliferation in cancer

Since their discovery in the 1950s, transfer RNAs (tRNAs) have been best known for their role in helping the cell make proteins from messenger RNA templates. However, recent studies have led to a previously-unsuspected concept that tRNAs are not always the end product; namely, they further serve as a source of small RNAs. [More]
Wistar Institute study shows that PI3K inhibitors may make a patient's cancer even worse

Wistar Institute study shows that PI3K inhibitors may make a patient's cancer even worse

The enzyme phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) appears to be exploited in almost every type of human cancer, making it the focus of considerable interest as a therapeutic target, with many PI3K-inhibiting drugs currently in various stages of clinical development. However, PI3K inhibitors have only shown modest clinical activity with patients who receive these drugs experiencing very little improvement in survival. [More]
New discovery could lead to personalized treatment for colon cancer

New discovery could lead to personalized treatment for colon cancer

A UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center discovery of just how a certain tumor suppressor molecule works to prevent tumor growth could lead to a personalized treatment approach for colon cancer. [More]
Study may predict which glioblastoma patients may respond well to dasatinib drug treatment

Study may predict which glioblastoma patients may respond well to dasatinib drug treatment

Clinicians testing the drug dasatinib, approved for several blood cancers, had hoped it would slow the aggressive growth of the deadly brain cancer glioblastoma; however, clinical trials to date have not found any benefit. Researchers at Mayo Clinic, who conducted one of those clinical trials, believe they know why dasatinib failed — and what to do about it. [More]
SLU's Center for Vaccine Development receives $2.9 million to study new vaccine to combat TB

SLU's Center for Vaccine Development receives $2.9 million to study new vaccine to combat TB

Saint Louis University's Center for Vaccine Development has received a $2.9 million award from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to study a new tuberculosis vaccine. [More]
Two antibodies show early promise in preventing and treating MERS

Two antibodies show early promise in preventing and treating MERS

As the South Korean epidemic of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) continues unabated, researchers have raced to find treatments for the deadly virus, which has killed more than 400 people since it was first discovered three years ago in Saudi Arabia. [More]
Researchers identify better way to screen for lung cancer

Researchers identify better way to screen for lung cancer

The Valley Hospital in Ridgewood, NJ, is pleased to announce that two of its oncologists and a research scientist are helping pave the way to an easier, more accurate, less invasive way to screen for the most common form of lung cancer. Lung cancer is the most common cancer in men worldwide and the number one cancer killer in the United States. [More]
Exhausted army of immune cells may damage the very body they are supposed to protect

Exhausted army of immune cells may damage the very body they are supposed to protect

An 'exhausted' army of immune cells may not be able to fight off infection, but if its soldiers fight too hard they risk damaging the very body they are meant to be protecting, suggests new research from the University of Cambridge. [More]
Moffitt Cancer Center awarded $3.6 million NIH grant to study use of e-cigarettes

Moffitt Cancer Center awarded $3.6 million NIH grant to study use of e-cigarettes

Moffitt Cancer Center received a $3.6 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to study the use of electronic cigarettes, or e-cigarettes, over the next five years. [More]
Two years may be a more practical survival goal for patients with follicular lymphoma

Two years may be a more practical survival goal for patients with follicular lymphoma

The goal for many cancer patients is to reach the five-year, disease-free mark, but new research from UR Medicine's Wilmot Cancer Institute suggests that two years might be a more practical survival goal for people with follicular lymphoma. [More]
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