Cancer News and Research RSS Feed - Cancer News and Research Twitter

Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body.

Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy.
ESC releases novel position paper on tackling cardiotoxicity of anticancer treatments

ESC releases novel position paper on tackling cardiotoxicity of anticancer treatments

The European Society of Cardiology has launched a novel position paper, under the auspices of its Committee for Practice Guidelines, on tackling the cardiac toxicity of anticancer therapies. The cardio-oncology paper is published online today in European Heart Journal and on the ESC Website. [More]
MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatment improves quality of life in patients with essential tremor

MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatment improves quality of life in patients with essential tremor

Treatment with MRI-guided focused ultrasound significantly improves tremors and quality of life in patients with essential tremor (ET), the most common movement disorder, according to a study published in the August 25 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Moderate physical activity reduces risk of acute cardiovascular event in older people

Moderate physical activity reduces risk of acute cardiovascular event in older people

Moderate physical activity is associated with a greater than 50% reduction in cardiovascular death in over-65s, according to research presented at ESC Congress 2016 today. The 12 year study in nearly 2500 adults aged 65 to 74 years found that moderate physical activity reduced the risk of an acute cardiovascular event by more than 30%. High levels of physical activity led to greater risk reductions. [More]
Newly-developed epigenetic test can be used to identify tumors responsible for metastasis in cancer patient

Newly-developed epigenetic test can be used to identify tumors responsible for metastasis in cancer patient

In patients with cancer, initial diagnosis most often includes the detection of the primary or original tumor and the presence or absence of metastases, ie cells from the original tumor that have escaped from their original location and are growing into other tissues of the patient. [More]
Can-Fite BioPharma reports financial results, provides update on drug development programs

Can-Fite BioPharma reports financial results, provides update on drug development programs

Can-Fite BioPharma Ltd., a biotechnology company with a pipeline of proprietary small molecule drugs being developed to treat inflammatory diseases, cancer and sexual dysfunction, today reported financial results for the six months ended June 30, 2016 and updates on its drug development programs. [More]
Basic cell biology research into neurodegeneration may fuel understanding of neurodegenerative diseases

Basic cell biology research into neurodegeneration may fuel understanding of neurodegenerative diseases

Clinical trials and translational medicine have certainly given people hope and rapid pathways to cures for some of mankind's most troublesome diseases, but now is not the time to overlook the power of basic research, says UC Santa Barbara neuroscientist Kenneth S. Kosik. [More]
Scientists grow noroviruses in laboratory cultures of human intestinal epithelial cells

Scientists grow noroviruses in laboratory cultures of human intestinal epithelial cells

Human noroviruses - the leading viral cause of acute diarrhea around the world - have been difficult to study because scientists had not found a way to grow them in the lab. [More]
Researchers find new way for early prediction of leukemic relapse

Researchers find new way for early prediction of leukemic relapse

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center have identified RNA-based biomarkers that distinguish between normal, aging hematopoietic stem cells and leukemia stem cells associated with secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML), a particularly problematic disease that typically afflicts older patients who have often already experienced a bout with cancer. [More]
New drug delivery system slows and controls tumors not aiming for complete elimination

New drug delivery system slows and controls tumors not aiming for complete elimination

Researchers have created a new drug delivery system that could improve the effectiveness of an emerging concept in cancer treatment - to dramatically slow and control tumors on a long-term, sustained basis, not necessarily aiming for their complete elimination. [More]
Banning tobacco product sales near schools could reduce disparities in tobacco retailer density

Banning tobacco product sales near schools could reduce disparities in tobacco retailer density

Banning tobacco sales within 1,000 feet of schools could reduce socioeconomic and racial/ethnic disparities in tobacco density across neighborhoods, according to a study being published today in the journal Nicotine & Tobacco Research. [More]
Advanced imaging technique could help select embryos most viable for successful pregnancy

Advanced imaging technique could help select embryos most viable for successful pregnancy

Researchers at the University of Adelaide have successfully trialed a new technique that could aid the process of choosing the "best" embryo for implantation, helping to boost the chances of pregnancy success from the very first IVF cycle. [More]
Novel small-molecule Wnt inhibitor may provide new treatment option for colorectal cancer patients

Novel small-molecule Wnt inhibitor may provide new treatment option for colorectal cancer patients

A team including the National Cancer Center, the RIKEN Center for Life Science Technologies , and Carna Biosciences Inc., has jointly announced the development of a novel small-molecule Wnt inhibitor named NCB-0846. [More]
New report documents fetal brain abnormalities linked to congenital Zika infection

New report documents fetal brain abnormalities linked to congenital Zika infection

In a special report released August 23 in the journal Radiology, a team of researchers including Deborah Levine, MD, Director of Obstetric & Gynecologic ultrasound at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School, documented the brain abnormalities associated with congenital Zika in 45 confirmed and presumed cases from northeastern Brazil. [More]
TSRI study sheds light on how mitochondrial calcium can affect learning and memory

TSRI study sheds light on how mitochondrial calcium can affect learning and memory

While calcium's importance for our bones and teeth is well known, its role in neurons—in particular, its effects on processes such as learning and memory—has been less well defined. [More]
Majority of cancers can be caused by infectious agents in sub-Saharan Africa, reveals study

Majority of cancers can be caused by infectious agents in sub-Saharan Africa, reveals study

In 1963, Irish surgeon Denis Parson Burkitt airmailed samples of an unusual jaw tumor found in Ugandan children to his colleague, Anthony Epstein, at Middlesex Hospital in London. [More]
Gene fusions in esophageal adenocarcinomas offer new molecular insights into lethal cancer

Gene fusions in esophageal adenocarcinomas offer new molecular insights into lethal cancer

Despite years of research, cellular mechanisms contributing to cancers like esophageal adenocarcinoma have remained elusive. [More]
Research findings point to potential drug targets to improve angiogenesis in diabetes patients

Research findings point to potential drug targets to improve angiogenesis in diabetes patients

Diabetes heightens the risk of vascular damage to heart and limbs, and impairs the ability to repair damage with new growth of blood vessels, called angiogenesis. [More]
Breakthrough in cancer cell screening advances personalised treatment of childhood leukaemia

Breakthrough in cancer cell screening advances personalised treatment of childhood leukaemia

Researchers at Newcastle University have been able to accurately predict how children whose cancer returns after treatment for leukaemia are likely to respond to further treatment. [More]
The evolution of medical imaging – where will innovation take us next?

The evolution of medical imaging – where will innovation take us next?

The influence of medical imaging is constantly growing, diseases are detected earlier and treatments are becoming more effective. Within the last 25 years, cancer mortality rates have decreased by an impressive 25%. Advances in medical imaging have a big part to play in this achievement and we can expect that as technology continues to develop, mortality rates will drop even further. [More]
Liver cancer time-bomb as up to 70% people with Hep C miss out on follow-up testing

Liver cancer time-bomb as up to 70% people with Hep C miss out on follow-up testing

Up to 70 per cent of Victorians with suspected hepatitis C may not have received follow-up testing, putting them at risk of chronic liver disease and even cancer, University of Melbourne researchers say. [More]
Advertisement