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Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body.

Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy.
New study reveals startling trend in mortality rates from heart disease and stroke

New study reveals startling trend in mortality rates from heart disease and stroke

After more than a decade of steady improvements, the decline in mortality rates from heart disease and stroke has slowed nationally and nearly leveled out since 2011, according to a new analysis from Kaiser Permanente published in JAMA Cardiology. [More]
Educating parents on healthy infant sleep-related behaviors may help prevent childhood obesity

Educating parents on healthy infant sleep-related behaviors may help prevent childhood obesity

Teaching parents bedtime techniques to encourage healthy sleep habits in their infants may help prevent obesity, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. Strong links exist between inadequate sleep and childhood obesity. [More]
High levels of calpain protein linked to improved survival of breast cancer patients

High levels of calpain protein linked to improved survival of breast cancer patients

A family of proteins that help cancer cells survive and spread around the body may be associated with improved prognosis for some women receiving treatment for breast cancer, research has shown. [More]
Researcher receives federal grant to advance study of tumor nanoimmunology

Researcher receives federal grant to advance study of tumor nanoimmunology

The five-year grant was awarded by the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health. The funds come on top of four previous grants to support Ljubimova's work. In all, the institute has awarded Ljubimova $16.5 million over the last five years. [More]
New technology could help deliver treatments for brain injuries

New technology could help deliver treatments for brain injuries

A new study led by scientists at the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute describes a technology that could lead to new therapeutics for traumatic brain injuries. The discovery, published today in Nature Communications, provides a means of homing drugs or nanoparticles to injured areas of the brain. [More]
TSRI scientists develop new strategy to design potential HIV vaccine candidates

TSRI scientists develop new strategy to design potential HIV vaccine candidates

Want to catch a criminal? Show a mugshot on the news. Want to stop HIV infections? Get the immune system to recognize and attack the virus's tell-tale structure. That's part of the basic approach behind efforts at The Scripps Research Institute to design an AIDS vaccine. [More]
Study shows travelling can be big source of exercise for Londoners

Study shows travelling can be big source of exercise for Londoners

Owning a car or bicycle has the strongest influence on how much active travel a Londoner engages in. Car ownership leaves them two to three times less likely to travel actively. [More]
Researchers develop new computational method to track colorectal cancer progression

Researchers develop new computational method to track colorectal cancer progression

Team of researchers elaborated a computational method to track the progress of the colorectal cancer. It is a scientific advance that can bring new perspectives to discover the factors that push this pathology and the selection of efficient therapies. [More]
Home test using paper strips could help detect cancer, malaria

Home test using paper strips could help detect cancer, malaria

What if testing yourself for cancer or other diseases were as easy as testing your blood sugar or taking a home pregnancy test? In a few years, it might be. [More]
Honeybee study finds link between social behavior and circadian rhythms

Honeybee study finds link between social behavior and circadian rhythms

Circadian rhythms are internal clocks that determine many of an organism's daily rhythms, for example sleep-wake, feeding, urinary output and hormone production. [More]
Scientists create protein signatures for accurate diagnosis of prostate cancer

Scientists create protein signatures for accurate diagnosis of prostate cancer

Researchers at the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research and University Health Network in Toronto, along with researchers at the Eastern Virginia Medical School, have created protein signatures that accurately diagnose prostate cancer and can distinguish between patients with aggressive versus non-aggressive disease using a simple urine sample. [More]
New microscopic silk swimming devices can be used safely in biological environments

New microscopic silk swimming devices can be used safely in biological environments

Sheffield engineers make major breakthrough in developing silk 'micro-rockets' that can be used safely in biological environments. [More]
Compounds extracted from parsley and dill seeds may help fight cancer

Compounds extracted from parsley and dill seeds may help fight cancer

A team of Russian scientists from Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, the N. D. Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry, the Institute of Developmental Biology, and the Institute of Cell Biophysics proposed an efficient approach to a novel agents with anticancer activity. [More]
Study shows women with CIN3 more likely to develop anogenital cancers

Study shows women with CIN3 more likely to develop anogenital cancers

Women with a history of severe cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, a precancerous condition of the cervix that arises from infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV), had a long-term increased risk of developing anal, vulvar, and vaginal cancer. [More]
New electric mesh device wraps around the heart to deliver electrical impulses

New electric mesh device wraps around the heart to deliver electrical impulses

A research team led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Seoul National University has developed a new electric mesh device that can be wrapped around the heart to deliver electrical impulses and thereby improve cardiac function in experimental models of heart failure, a major public health concern and leading cause of mortality and disability. [More]
Therapeutic stem cells exit bloodstream in different way than previously thought

Therapeutic stem cells exit bloodstream in different way than previously thought

Researchers at North Carolina State University have discovered that therapeutic stem cells exit the bloodstream in a different manner than was previously thought. This process, dubbed angiopellosis by the researchers, has implications for improving our understanding of not only intravenous stem cell therapies, but also metastatic cancers. [More]
Two vaccine candidates provide complete protection against ZIKV infection in mice

Two vaccine candidates provide complete protection against ZIKV infection in mice

The rapid development of a safe and effective vaccine to prevent the Zika virus (ZIKV) is a global priority, as infection in pregnant women has been shown to lead to fetal microcephaly and other major birth defects. [More]
Bioengineers develop 2-in-1 nanomedicine for treating cancer

Bioengineers develop 2-in-1 nanomedicine for treating cancer

For cancer therapy, treatment resistance poses a major hurdle. Even aggressive treatments such as immunotherapies or nanomedicines may fail to eliminate all cancer cells, allowing new mutations to develop that may cause relapse. [More]
Non-invasive fluid-based biomarker could help identify aggressive prostate cancer before surgery

Non-invasive fluid-based biomarker could help identify aggressive prostate cancer before surgery

Prostate cancer researchers have discovered biomarkers using non-invasive liquid biopsies to identify aggressive disease before surgery. [More]
Epclusa drug receives FDA approval for treating adult patients with chronic HCV

Epclusa drug receives FDA approval for treating adult patients with chronic HCV

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Epclusa to treat adult patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) both with and without cirrhosis (advanced liver disease). [More]
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