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Cancer begins in your cells, which are the building blocks of your body. Normally, your body forms new cells as you need them, replacing old cells that die. Sometimes this process goes wrong. New cells grow even when you don't need them, and old cells don't die when they should. These extra cells can form a mass called a tumor. Tumors can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer while malignant ones are. Cells from malignant tumors can invade nearby tissues. They can also break away and spread to other parts of the body.

Most cancers are named for where they start. For example, lung cancer starts in the lung, and breast cancer starts in the breast. The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another is called metastasis. Symptoms and treatment depend on the cancer type and how advanced it is. Treatment plans may include surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy.
Invisible blood in urine: An early warning sign of bladder cancer

Invisible blood in urine: An early warning sign of bladder cancer

New research which finds that invisible blood in urine may be an early warning sign of bladder cancer is likely to shape guidelines for clinicians. [More]
New report on global peptide cancer therapeutics market

New report on global peptide cancer therapeutics market

Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Global Peptide Cancer Therapeutics Market & Pipeline Insight 2014" report to their offering. [More]
ESC launches first recommendations on use of all new oral anticoagulants in pulmonary embolism

ESC launches first recommendations on use of all new oral anticoagulants in pulmonary embolism

The first recommendations on the use of all new oral anticoagulants in pulmonary embolism are published today in new ESC Guidelines. [More]
Internal production of hydrogen peroxide can lead cells to exit cell cycle and become senescent

Internal production of hydrogen peroxide can lead cells to exit cell cycle and become senescent

What happens inside cells when they detect the activation of a cancer-inducing gene? Sometimes, cells are able to signal internally to stop the cell cycle. Such cells are able to enter, at least for a time, a protective non-growth state. [More]
Dartmouth researchers evaluate role of assortativity signature on robustness

Dartmouth researchers evaluate role of assortativity signature on robustness

Dartmouth researchers explored the type and number of connections in transcription factor networks (TFNs) to evaluate the role assortativity plays on robustness in a study published in PLOS Computational Biology in August. [More]
Initiatives to reduce deaths from heart failure for patients worldwide

Initiatives to reduce deaths from heart failure for patients worldwide

The Heart Failure Association (HFA) of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) is calling for global policy change relating to heart failure. An international white paper, Heart failure: preventing disease and death worldwide, was published in May 2014. [More]
Preventing tentacle-like structures from forming can stop spread of cancer entirely

Preventing tentacle-like structures from forming can stop spread of cancer entirely

A new study from the research group of Dr. John Lewis at the University of Alberta (Edmonton, AB) and the Lawson Health Research Institute (London, ON) has confirmed that "invadopodia" play a key role in the spread of cancer. The study, published in Cell Reports, shows preventing these tentacle-like structures from forming can stop the spread of cancer entirely. [More]
Factor in cells of naked mole rats protects activity of proteasome

Factor in cells of naked mole rats protects activity of proteasome

Scientists at the Barshop Institute for Longevity and Aging Studies, part of the School of Medicine at the UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, have found another secret of longevity in the tissues of the longest-lived rodent, the naked mole rat. [More]
Research roundup: Benefits of hip surgery; preventing surgical infections; assessing ACOs' predecessors

Research roundup: Benefits of hip surgery; preventing surgical infections; assessing ACOs' predecessors

Surgical treatment of hip fractures can achieve better survival and functional outcomes than nonoperative treatment, but less is known about its economic benefits. ... We estimated the effects of surgical treatment for displaced hip fractures through a Markov cohort analysis of patients 65 years and older. ... Estimated average lifetime societal benefits per patient exceeded the direct medical costs of hip fracture surgery by $65,000 to $68,000 for displaced hip fractures. With the exception of the assumption of nursing home use, the sensitivity analyses show that surgery produces positive net societal savings (Gu, Koenig, Mather and Tongue, 8/5). [More]
Researchers find method to expand blood stem cells used to treat cancer patients

Researchers find method to expand blood stem cells used to treat cancer patients

A team of scientists from the University of Colorado School of Medicine has reported the breakthrough discovery of a process to expand production of stem cells used to treat cancer patients. [More]
Researchers explore connections in TFNs to evaluate role assortativity plays on robustness

Researchers explore connections in TFNs to evaluate role assortativity plays on robustness

Dartmouth researchers explored the type and number of connections in transcription factor networks (TFNs) to evaluate the role assortativity plays on robustness in a study published in PLOS Computational Biology in August. [More]
KIT spinoff amcure develops tumor therapeutic agents to reduce mortality rate

KIT spinoff amcure develops tumor therapeutic agents to reduce mortality rate

There is an urgent need for medical agents to treat metastatic tumors. In case of pancreatic cancer, one of the most aggressive types of cancer that is often detected late, 95% of the patients die within five years after the diagnosis. [More]
UT Southwestern faculty awarded CPRIT grants to combat cancer

UT Southwestern faculty awarded CPRIT grants to combat cancer

UT Southwestern Medical Center faculty have received 19 grants totaling more than $26 million from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas to expand cancer screenings, investigate the effectiveness and viability for cancer therapies and radiation treatments, conduct research into cancer biology, and recruitment. [More]
Solid-head power toothbrushes retain less bacteria than hollow-head toothbrushes

Solid-head power toothbrushes retain less bacteria than hollow-head toothbrushes

Solid-head power toothbrushes retain less bacteria compared to hollow-head toothbrushes, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Dentistry. [More]
New method could help doctors better understand how drug abuse affects the brain

New method could help doctors better understand how drug abuse affects the brain

A new method for measuring and imaging how quickly blood flows in the brain could help doctors and researchers better understand how drug abuse affects the brain, which may aid in improving brain-cancer surgery and tissue engineering, and lead to better treatment options for recovering drug addicts. [More]
Rice University researchers confirm potent synthesis of natural tetracycline

Rice University researchers confirm potent synthesis of natural tetracycline

A fortuitous collaboration at Rice University has led to the total synthesis of a recently discovered natural antibiotic. [More]
22otters launches HerStory app that enables women to share health advice, stories with each other

22otters launches HerStory app that enables women to share health advice, stories with each other

HerStory, a new smartphone app that enables women to share health advice and stories with each other, was recently launched by 22otters, a Khosla Ventures-funded digital health startup. [More]
Physically active men are at lower risk of nocturia

Physically active men are at lower risk of nocturia

Men who are physically active are at lower risk of nocturia (waking up at night to urinate), according to a study led by a Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine researcher. [More]
Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center receives NCORP grant to conduct cancer clinical trials

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center receives NCORP grant to conduct cancer clinical trials

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center has received an $18 million, five-year grant from the National Cancer Institute's Community Oncology Research Program to design and conduct community-based, multi-center screening, prevention and control cancer clinical trials. [More]
New online analytic tool enhances process of re-engineering cells for biomedical research

New online analytic tool enhances process of re-engineering cells for biomedical research

A Mayo Clinic researcher and his collaborators have developed an online analytic tool that will speed up and enhance the process of re-engineering cells for biomedical investigation. CellNet is a free-use Internet platform that uses network biology methods to aid stem cell engineering. [More]