Cardiology News and Research RSS Feed - Cardiology News and Research

Cardiology is the branch of internal medicine dealing with disorders of the heart and blood vessels. The field is commonly divided in the branches of congenital heart defects, coronary artery disease, heart failure, valvular heart disease and electrophysiology.
Digoxin drug associated with higher risk of death, hospitalization among adults with atrial fibrillation

Digoxin drug associated with higher risk of death, hospitalization among adults with atrial fibrillation

Digoxin, a drug commonly used to treat heart conditions, was associated with a 71 percent higher risk of death and a 63 percent higher risk of hospitalization among adults with diagnosed atrial fibrillation and no evidence of heart failure, according to a Kaiser Permanente study that appears in the current online issue of Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology. [More]
Study sheds light on how HIV medications cause significant damage to fetal hearts

Study sheds light on how HIV medications cause significant damage to fetal hearts

A study by a Wayne State University and Children's Hospital of Michigan, Detroit Medical Center research team is shedding new light on the troubling question of whether the drugs often given to HIV-positive pregnant women can cause significant long-term heart problems for the non-HIV-infected babies they carry. [More]
High-quality U.S. hospitals also provide low-cost care for children undergoing heart surgery

High-quality U.S. hospitals also provide low-cost care for children undergoing heart surgery

U.S. children's hospitals delivering the highest-quality care for children undergoing heart surgery, also appear to provide care most efficiently at a low cost, according to research led by the University of Michigan and presented Tuesday at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions in Chicago. [More]
Kidney disease patients can benefit from simple and structured exercise

Kidney disease patients can benefit from simple and structured exercise

Simple yet structured exercise can significantly improve kidney disease patients' quality of life as well as decrease their pain, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN). [More]
Obese people experience silent cardiac damage that fuels risk for heart failure

Obese people experience silent cardiac damage that fuels risk for heart failure

Using an ultrasensitive blood test to detect the presence of a protein that heralds heart muscle injury, researchers from Johns Hopkins and elsewhere have found that obese people without overt heart disease experience silent cardiac damage that fuels their risk for heart failure down the road. [More]
Training medical students on handheld ultrasound device can enhance their physical diagnosis

Training medical students on handheld ultrasound device can enhance their physical diagnosis

A new study by researchers from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai found that training medical students to use a handheld ultrasound device can enhance the accuracy of their physical diagnosis. [More]
Childhood affective features may guide adult psychiatric diagnosis

Childhood affective features may guide adult psychiatric diagnosis

Clinical features that can appear many years ahead of a psychiatric diagnosis may help doctors to predict whether patients will develop bipolar disorder or unipolar depression, say researchers. [More]
Cyberonics' worldwide net sales increase 5% to $73.4M in Q2 of fiscal 2015

Cyberonics' worldwide net sales increase 5% to $73.4M in Q2 of fiscal 2015

Cyberonics, Inc. today announced results for the quarter ended October 24, 2014. [More]
CHOP presents new findings on pediatric cardiovascular disease at AHA Scientific Sessions

CHOP presents new findings on pediatric cardiovascular disease at AHA Scientific Sessions

Physician-researchers from the Cardiac Center at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia presented new findings on pediatric cardiovascular disease at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014 in Chicago. [More]
Study shows how stem cells can help regenerate damaged muscle after heart attack

Study shows how stem cells can help regenerate damaged muscle after heart attack

Delivering stem cell factor directly into damaged heart muscle after a heart attack may help repair and regenerate injured tissue, according to a study led by researchers from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai presented November 18 at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2014 in Chicago, IL. [More]
Gene therapy transforms life for men with severe form of hemophilia B

Gene therapy transforms life for men with severe form of hemophilia B

Gene therapy developed at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, University College London and the Royal Free Hospital has transformed life for men with a severe form of hemophilia B by providing a safe, reliable source of the blood clotting protein Factor IX that has allowed some to adopt a more active lifestyle, researchers reported. [More]
Scientists discover second wave of heart muscle inflammation within a week after heart attack

Scientists discover second wave of heart muscle inflammation within a week after heart attack

Results of a new study challenge the current consensus in cardiology that peak myocardial edema, or heart muscle swelling, only occurs just after a myocardial infarction, or heart attack. In the study, presented as a Late-Breaking Clinical Trial at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2014 and published simultaneously in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, scientists discovered a second wave of swelling and inflammation occurs within a week of a heart attack. [More]

Strict monitoring of lithium levels urged

Plasma levels of lithium above the advised range are associated with a transient reduction in kidney function, research shows. [More]
UNMC gets $2.5 million grant to make EHR more useful for physicians, safer for patients

UNMC gets $2.5 million grant to make EHR more useful for physicians, safer for patients

The University of Nebraska Medical Center has received a $2.5 million grant to make the electronic health record (EHR) more useful for health professionals and safer for patients. [More]
Cholesterol efflux appears to be superior indicator of cardiovascular risk

Cholesterol efflux appears to be superior indicator of cardiovascular risk

Groundbreaking research from UT Southwestern Medical Center shows that cholesterol efflux capacity (cholesterol efflux), which measures HDL cholesterol function, appears to be a superior indicator of cardiovascular risk and a better target for therapeutic treatments than standard measurements of HDL. Current measurement methods reflect only the circulating levels of HDL and not the functional properties of this lipoprotein. [More]
Nationwide STEMI rates drop, reveals Vanderbilt study

Nationwide STEMI rates drop, reveals Vanderbilt study

The most emergent form of heart attacks is decreasing nationwide, but this declining incidence could affect emergency departments' quality and timeliness of care. [More]
Study finds that fat around heart closely associated with atrial fibrillation

Study finds that fat around heart closely associated with atrial fibrillation

Obesity is a known risk factor for atrial fibrillation, the most common heart rhythm disorder. [More]
Asthma associated with higher risk of heart attack or stroke

Asthma associated with higher risk of heart attack or stroke

Asthma that requires daily medication is associated with a significantly higher risk of heart attack or stroke, according to a new study from the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. [More]
Vital exhaustion may increase risk of first-time cardiovascular disease by 36%

Vital exhaustion may increase risk of first-time cardiovascular disease by 36%

Fatigue, increased irritability, and feeling demoralized, may raise a healthy man or woman's risk of first-time cardiovascular disease by 36 percent, according to a study led by researchers at Mount Sinai St. Luke's and Mount Sinai Roosevelt hospitals presented on Nov. 17 at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2014 in Chicago, IL. [More]
Using cardiac biomarkers to identify NSTEMI and ACS patients: an interview with Peter Mason

Using cardiac biomarkers to identify NSTEMI and ACS patients: an interview with Peter Mason

ACS is currently identified through the use of ECGs pre-hospital and the confirmed via a Troponin biomarker test once in the acute setting. [More]