Dementia News and Research RSS Feed - Dementia News and Research

Dementia is not a specific disease. It is a descriptive term for a collection of symptoms that can be caused by a number of disorders that affect the brain. People with dementia have significantly impaired intellectual functioning that interferes with normal activities and relationships. They also lose their ability to solve problems and maintain emotional control, and they may experience personality changes and behavioral problems, such as agitation, delusions, and hallucinations.
Sleeping more than 8 hours favours development of cognitive impairment in people over 65

Sleeping more than 8 hours favours development of cognitive impairment in people over 65

Sleeping more than 8 hours and less than 6 and the lack of cognitive stimulation such as reading favours the development of cognitive impairment in people over 65. This is the main conclusion of a study carried out by researchers from the Department of Pharmacy at the University CEU Cardenal Herrera and pharmacists in the Valencian Region (Spain). [More]
State highlights: Tenn. may send addicted moms to jail; Hawaii autism coverage; Florida medical marijuana

State highlights: Tenn. may send addicted moms to jail; Hawaii autism coverage; Florida medical marijuana

Pregnant women addicted to illegal narcotics or prescription pain pills could soon be jailed in Tennessee under a bill awaiting the governor's signature. [More]
NeuroPhage engineers series of molecules with potential to treat most neurodegenerative diseases

NeuroPhage engineers series of molecules with potential to treat most neurodegenerative diseases

‚ÄčResearchers from NeuroPhage Pharmaceuticals, Inc. have engineered a series of molecules with the potential to treat most neurodegenerative diseases that are characterized by misfolded proteins, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. [More]
Researchers uncover novel function of Amyloid Precursor Protein linked to Alzheimer's disease

Researchers uncover novel function of Amyloid Precursor Protein linked to Alzheimer's disease

A research team led by the National Neuroscience Institute has uncovered a novel function of the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP), one of the main pathogenic culprits of Alzheimer's disease. This discovery may help researchers understand how the protein goes awry in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients, and potentially paves the way for the development of innovative therapeutics to improve the brain function of dementia patients. [More]
New approach to handle people with dementia may help reduce use of antipsychotics drugs

New approach to handle people with dementia may help reduce use of antipsychotics drugs

A new approach to handling agitation, aggression and other unwanted behaviors by people with dementia may help reduce the use of antipsychotics and other psychiatric drugs in this population, and make life easier for them and their caregivers, a team of experts says. [More]

New approach may help reduce use of antipsychotics and other psychiatric drugs in dementia patients

A new approach to handling agitation, aggression and other unwanted behaviors by people with dementia may help reduce the use of antipsychotics and other psychiatric drugs in this population, and make life easier for them and their caregivers, a team of experts says. [More]
Research roundup: Colonscopy in the countryside; retiree health benefits; what should hip surgery cost?

Research roundup: Colonscopy in the countryside; retiree health benefits; what should hip surgery cost?

Rural residents who commonly seek treatment for advanced stages of colorectal cancer have been thought to lack access to cancer screening and adjuvant therapy. ... Several theories have been postulated to explain these findings, some of which include low socioeconomic status, lower educational attainment, lack of insurance coverage, underinsurance, and travel distance to health care facilities. [More]
Researchers devise new approach to treatment of Alzheimer's disease

Researchers devise new approach to treatment of Alzheimer's disease

A team of researchers from Columbia University Medical Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, and Brandeis University has devised a wholly new approach to the treatment of Alzheimer's disease involving the so-called retromer protein complex. Retromer plays a vital role in neurons, steering amyloid precursor protein (APP) away from a region of the cell where APP is cleaved, creating the potentially toxic byproduct amyloid-beta, which is thought to contribute to the development of Alzheimer's. [More]
Researchers develop class of drugs to lessen impact of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's

Researchers develop class of drugs to lessen impact of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's

‚ÄčA class of drugs developed to treat immune-related conditions and cancer - including one currently in clinical trials for glioblastoma and other tumors - eliminates neural inflammation associated with dementia-linked diseases and brain injuries, according to UC Irvine researchers. [More]

Apathy signals brain shrinkage in old people

Launer's team used brain volume as a measure of accelerated brain aging. Brain volume losses occur during normal aging, but in this study, larger amounts of brain volume loss could indicate brain diseases. [More]

Parabon launches Compute Against Alzheimer's Disease research initiative

Parabon Computation announced today the launch of the Compute Against Alzheimer's Disease (CAAD) research initiative, which will accelerate investigations into the causes and risks of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) through the application of large-scale computational capacity donated by concerned citizens and organizations. [More]
Genetically modified neural stem cells offer potential treatment for Alzheimer's disease

Genetically modified neural stem cells offer potential treatment for Alzheimer's disease

UC Irvine neurobiologists have found that genetically modified neural stem cells show positive results when transplanted into the brains of mice with the symptoms and pathology of Alzheimer's disease. The pre-clinical trial is published in the journal Stem Cells Research and Therapy, and the approach has been shown to work in two different mouse models. [More]

New mouse model breakthrough for Alzheimer's disease research

Alzheimer's disease, the primary cause of dementia in the elderly, imposes a tremendous social and economic burden on modern society. In Japan, the burden of the disease in 2050 is estimated to be a half a trillion US dollars, a figure equivalent to the government's annual revenues. [More]

Residential aged care facilities need to tackle antipsychotic usage in dementia patients

NPS MedicineWise has welcomed the recommendations of the recently released Senate Committee report on the care of Australians living with dementia and is encouraging residential aged care facilities to tackle the overuse of antipsychotics medicines in people with behavioural or psychological problems associated with dementia. [More]

Variability in SBP portends cognitive decline

Findings from the Ohasama study reveal an association between variability in home systolic blood pressure and cognitive decline. [More]

Cognitive impairment common among seniors living in nursing homes and community

More than 70% of elderly Medicare beneficiaries experience cognitive impairment or severe dementia near the end-of-life and may need surrogate decision makers for healthcare decisions. Advance care planning for older adults with dementia may be particularly important for individuals who do not reside in a nursing home or a long-term care facility, according to an article published in the April issue of Health Affairs. [More]
Longer looks: Vermont's single payer system; Nevada's cancer cluster; the toll of dementia on a family

Longer looks: Vermont's single payer system; Nevada's cancer cluster; the toll of dementia on a family

Skatchewan is a vast prairie province in the middle of Canada. It's home to hockey great Gordie Howe and the world's first curling museum. But Canadians know it for another reason: it's the birthplace of the country's single-payer health-care system. [More]
Researchers identify biological process that appears to trigger Parkinson's disease

Researchers identify biological process that appears to trigger Parkinson's disease

Working with human neurons and fruit flies, researchers at Johns Hopkins have identified and then shut down a biological process that appears to trigger a particular form of Parkinson's disease present in a large number of patients. A report on the study, in the April 10 issue of the journal Cell, could lead to new treatments for this disorder. [More]
Older people with memory and thinking problems may have lower risk of dying from cancer

Older people with memory and thinking problems may have lower risk of dying from cancer

Older people who are starting to have memory and thinking problems, but do not yet have dementia may have a lower risk of dying from cancer than people who have no memory and thinking problems, according to a study published in the April 9, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Two new dementia care models seek to improve quality of care for older adults

Two new dementia care models seek to improve quality of care for older adults

The number of older adults with dementia in the United States is forecast to more than double over the next 40 years. Caring for these individuals will have a significant impact on caregivers as well as the health care system and its workforce. [More]