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Dementia is not a specific disease. It is a descriptive term for a collection of symptoms that can be caused by a number of disorders that affect the brain. People with dementia have significantly impaired intellectual functioning that interferes with normal activities and relationships. They also lose their ability to solve problems and maintain emotional control, and they may experience personality changes and behavioral problems, such as agitation, delusions, and hallucinations.
Nonmotor predictors of Parkinson’s dementia revealed

Nonmotor predictors of Parkinson’s dementia revealed

Researchers have identified nonmotor and nondopaminergic motor features that predict incident dementia in patients with Parkinson’s disease. [More]

Higher level of vocabulary can help combat cognitive impairment

Some people suffer incipient dementia as they get older. To make up for this loss, the brain's cognitive reserve is put to the test. [More]
BIDMC investigators develop three-minute assessment that identifies delirium in older hospital patients

BIDMC investigators develop three-minute assessment that identifies delirium in older hospital patients

Delirium is a state of confusion that develops suddenly, often following an acute medical illness, a surgical procedure or a hospitalization. Although delirium is estimated to complicate hospital stays for over 2.5 million elderly individuals in the U.S. each year, this common condition often goes undetected. The end result can be serious complications with sometimes devastating consequences for vulnerable hospitalized elders. [More]

New SPANS assessment can help patients recover from traumatic brain injuries

A dynamic new assessment for helping victims of trauma to the brain, including those suffering from progressive conditions such as dementia, has been developed by a clinical neuropsychologist at the University of Leicester. [More]
Renowned photographer creates 'Profiles of LBD' portrait series to support LBD campaign

Renowned photographer creates 'Profiles of LBD' portrait series to support LBD campaign

In honor of Lewy Body Dementia (LBD) Awareness Month, the Lewy Body Dementia Association proudly unveils, "The Profiles of LBD," a portrait series of families living with the disease. [More]
Infection with herpes simplex virus increases Alzheimer's risk

Infection with herpes simplex virus increases Alzheimer's risk

Infection with herpes simplex virus increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease. Researchers at Umeå University, Sweden, claim this in two studies in the journal Alzheimer's & Dementia. [More]
Researchers propose new milestones to augment National Alzheimer's Plan

Researchers propose new milestones to augment National Alzheimer's Plan

The U.S. Government has initiated a major effort to prevent and effectively treat Alzheimer's disease by 2025. However, a workgroup of nearly 40 Alzheimer's researchers and scientists says the research milestones in the U.S. Government's National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease must be broadened in scope, increased in scale, and adequately funded in order to successfully achieve this goal. [More]
Research: Ageing and depression are associated with epigenetic changes

Research: Ageing and depression are associated with epigenetic changes

Psychological stress and stress-related psychiatric disorders are associated with increased risk for aging-related diseases, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this relation are unknown. [More]
Middle-aged women with neurotic personality may develop Alzheimer disease later in life

Middle-aged women with neurotic personality may develop Alzheimer disease later in life

Women who worry, cope poorly with stress and/or experience mood swings in middle age run a higher risk of developing Alzheimer disease later in life. This is the conclusion of a study carried out at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, that followed 800 women for nearly 40 years. [More]
Scientists receive BBSRC funding to study how neural stem cells differ from each other

Scientists receive BBSRC funding to study how neural stem cells differ from each other

A team of scientists led by a researcher from Plymouth University has received funding of more than £400,000 from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council to investigate how neural stem cells differ from each other. The study's findings could hold the key to the future use of neural stem cells in treatments to eradicate neurological conditions such as dementia and brain tumours. [More]
Women prescribed different medication than men to bring down blood pressure

Women prescribed different medication than men to bring down blood pressure

Women who are treated for high blood pressure are not given the same medication as men, nor do they hit the treatment targets as often, reveals a thesis from the University of Gothenburg. [More]
New research reveals innovative way to classify severity of stroke

New research reveals innovative way to classify severity of stroke

New research conducted at the Florida State University-based National High Magnetic Field Laboratory has revealed a new, innovative way to classify the severity of a stroke, aid in diagnosis and evaluate potential treatments. [More]
G-tube placement not needed for patients with advanced dementia or other near end-of-life conditions

G-tube placement not needed for patients with advanced dementia or other near end-of-life conditions

Based on current scientific literature, gastrostomy tube (G-tube) placement or other long-term enteral access devices should be withheld or withdrawn in patients with advanced dementia or other near end-of-life conditions, according to a special report published today in the OnlineFirst version of Nutrition in Clinical Practice, the official journal of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition. [More]
Standardized guidelines for collection of blood to test for early Alzheimer's disease

Standardized guidelines for collection of blood to test for early Alzheimer's disease

The first standardized guidelines for the collection of blood to test for early Alzheimer's disease have been established by an international working group led by UNT Health Science Center. [More]
Protein that plays key role in neurological diseases regulates neuronal communication by self-association

Protein that plays key role in neurological diseases regulates neuronal communication by self-association

The protein alpha-synuclein is a well-known player in Parkinson's disease and other related neurological conditions, such as dementia with Lewy bodies. Its normal functions, however, have long remained unknown. [More]
Research finding opens door to potential treatment for MPS IIIB

Research finding opens door to potential treatment for MPS IIIB

MPS IIIB is a devastating and currently untreatable disease that causes progressive damage to the brain, leading to profound intellectual disability, dementia and death -- often before reaching adulthood. [More]
Standard cognition test falls short in Parkinson’s disease patients

Standard cognition test falls short in Parkinson’s disease patients

There is a wide range of cognitive function, including dementia, among patients with Parkinson’s disease who are classed as cognitively normal on the Mini-Mental State Examination, research shows. [More]
Self-reported memory complaints are strong predictors of Alzheimer's later in life

Self-reported memory complaints are strong predictors of Alzheimer's later in life

New research by scientists at the University of Kentucky's Sanders-Brown Center on Aging suggests that people who notice their memory is slipping may be on to something. [More]
People with memory loss more likely to develop dementia later, study finds

People with memory loss more likely to develop dementia later, study finds

New research suggests that people without dementia who begin reporting memory issues may be more likely to develop dementia later, even if they have no clinical signs of the disease. [More]
Northwestern scientists develop first animal model for ALS dementia

Northwestern scientists develop first animal model for ALS dementia

The first animal model for ALS dementia, a form of ALS that also damages the brain, has been developed by Northwestern Medicine- scientists. The advance will allow researchers to directly see the brains of living mice, under anesthesia, at the microscopic level. This will allow direct monitoring of test drugs to determine if they work. [More]