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Dementia is not a specific disease. It is a descriptive term for a collection of symptoms that can be caused by a number of disorders that affect the brain. People with dementia have significantly impaired intellectual functioning that interferes with normal activities and relationships. They also lose their ability to solve problems and maintain emotional control, and they may experience personality changes and behavioral problems, such as agitation, delusions, and hallucinations.
Dementia decline heralds hope of reduced burden

Dementia decline heralds hope of reduced burden

Analysis of participants in the Framingham Heart Study has shown a decline in dementia over a period of 3 decades. [More]
Poor physical fitness in middle age linked to smaller brain size 20 years later

Poor physical fitness in middle age linked to smaller brain size 20 years later

Poor physical fitness in middle age may be linked to a smaller brain size 20 years later, according to a study published in the February 10, 2016, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Study finds significant variation in dementia incidence among ethnic and racial groups

Study finds significant variation in dementia incidence among ethnic and racial groups

In the largest and longest study thus far of ethnic disparities in dementia risk, researchers compared six ethnic and racial groups within the same geographic population and found significant variation in dementia incidence among them. [More]
Researchers devise lipid-based diets to relieve symptoms of Alzheimer's disease

Researchers devise lipid-based diets to relieve symptoms of Alzheimer's disease

Alzheimer´s disease (AD) is the most common disease underlying memory problems and dementia in the elderly. One of the invariable pathologies in AD is degeneration of cholinergic synapses in brain cortex and hippocampus. [More]
Dementia incidence highest in African Americans, lowest in Asian Americans

Dementia incidence highest in African Americans, lowest in Asian Americans

The first study to look at dementia risk in a population representing the diversity of the United States finds dementia incidence to be highest in African Americans and lowest in Asian Americans. The rate of occurrence of dementia in African Americans was found to be 65 percent higher than Asian Americans. [More]
Fasudil improves memory in rats, promotes degradation of toxic tau in the eyes of fruit flies

Fasudil improves memory in rats, promotes degradation of toxic tau in the eyes of fruit flies

Could a kinase inhibitor some doctors prescribe to keep blood flowing after brain surgery be used to treat neurodegeneration? New research suggests it might be worth exploring the question. [More]
Study sheds light on role of red raspberries in metabolically-based chronic diseases

Study sheds light on role of red raspberries in metabolically-based chronic diseases

Components in red raspberries may have anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and metabolic stabilizing activity, according to a comprehensive review of the available scientific literature published in the January issue of Advances in Nutrition. [More]
New discovery takes medical professionals a leap forward to effectively diagnose Alzheimer's disease

New discovery takes medical professionals a leap forward to effectively diagnose Alzheimer's disease

Medical professionals have to conduct a long series of tests to assess a patient's memory impairment and cognitive skills, functional abilities, and behavioral changes to accurately diagnose Alzheimer's disease. They also have to execute costly brain imagining scans and even, sometimes, invasive cerebral spinal fluid tests to rule out other diseases. The process is laborious at best -- and subjective at worst. [More]
2020 dementia challenge to be tackled by MOOC

2020 dementia challenge to be tackled by MOOC

The University of Derby’s Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) titled ‘Bridging the Dementia Divide’ is back by popular demand after the University received high levels of requests to run the course again. [More]
Benzodiazepine dementia risk refuted

Benzodiazepine dementia risk refuted

Benzodiazepines, commonly used by older adults to manage sleep, anxiety and depressive disorders, do not increase the risk of dementia or hasten cognitive decline, study findings show. [More]
Past experience alters the brain circuitry responsible for object recognition

Past experience alters the brain circuitry responsible for object recognition

New research from the University of Guelph on the brain and memory could help in developing therapies for people with schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Clinical observations: replacing paper with mobiles? An interview with Eran David

Clinical observations: replacing paper with mobiles? An interview with Eran David

Replacing paper with technology has significant safety ramifications. Using a mobile device for electronic observations increases the accuracy of documentation and score calculations. [More]
People with traumatic brain injuries may have buildup of plaques related to Alzheimer's disease

People with traumatic brain injuries may have buildup of plaques related to Alzheimer's disease

A new study suggests that people with brain injuries following head trauma may have buildup of the plaques related to Alzheimer's disease in their brains. The research is published in the February 3, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Mercury may not thwart seafood brain benefits

Mercury may not thwart seafood brain benefits

Accumulation of mercury in the brain from eating seafood does not appear to lead to Alzheimer’s disease neuropathology, shows research published in JAMA. [More]
BDNF gene expression signals cognitive reserve against AD progression

BDNF gene expression signals cognitive reserve against AD progression

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression contributes to slowing of cognitive decline in older adults and may protect against the effects of Alzheimer’s disease pathology, researchers report in Neurology. [More]
Elder financial exploitation resulting from age-related cognitive decline pose major economic threats

Elder financial exploitation resulting from age-related cognitive decline pose major economic threats

Protecting the wealth of older adults should be a high priority for banks, insurance companies, and others, according to the latest edition of Public Policy & Aging Report (PP&AR). Elder financial exploitation and diminished financial capacity resulting from age-related cognitive impairments both pose major economic threats, the issue finds. [More]
Seafood consumption may benefit older adults at risk for Alzheimer's disease

Seafood consumption may benefit older adults at risk for Alzheimer's disease

New research published Feb. 2 in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that older adults with a major risk gene for Alzheimer's disease known as APOE?4 who ate at least one seafood serving per week showed fewer signs of Alzheimer's-related brain changes. In contrast, this association was not found in the brains of volunteers who ate fish weekly but did not carry the risk gene. [More]
Continuing weight loss from midlife predicts MCI risk

Continuing weight loss from midlife predicts MCI risk

Increasing weight loss from middle age through the later stages of life may be an indicator of mild cognitive impairment, suggest study findings. [More]
Depression symptoms increase risk for heart disease, stroke in middle-aged and older adults

Depression symptoms increase risk for heart disease, stroke in middle-aged and older adults

Depression and its symptoms increase as people age, and have been linked to heart disease and stroke in both middle-aged and older adults. But whether depression and its symptoms are risk factors for these two dangerous conditions has been unclear. [More]
Understanding crucial role of 'healthy' brain in preventing memory failures linked to Alzheimer's disease

Understanding crucial role of 'healthy' brain in preventing memory failures linked to Alzheimer's disease

The mechanisms underlying the stability and plasticity of neural circuits in the hippocampus, the part of the brain responsible for spatial memory and the memory of everyday facts and events, has been a major focus of study in the field of neuroscience. Understanding precisely how a "healthy" brain stores and processes information is crucial to preventing and reversing the memory failures associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of late-life dementia. [More]
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