Dementia News and Research RSS Feed - Dementia News and Research

Dementia is not a specific disease. It is a descriptive term for a collection of symptoms that can be caused by a number of disorders that affect the brain. People with dementia have significantly impaired intellectual functioning that interferes with normal activities and relationships. They also lose their ability to solve problems and maintain emotional control, and they may experience personality changes and behavioral problems, such as agitation, delusions, and hallucinations.
Study links dopamine D2 receptor to long-term episodic memory

Study links dopamine D2 receptor to long-term episodic memory

A European study led by Umea University Professor Lars Nyberg, has shown that the dopamine D2 receptor is linked to the long-term episodic memory, which function often reduces with age and due to dementia. [More]
New study demonstrates no risk of contracting dementia through blood transfusion

New study demonstrates no risk of contracting dementia through blood transfusion

Previous studies have shown that neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's can be induced in healthy laboratory animals, causing concern that dementia diseases can be transmitted between individuals, possibly via blood transfusions. [More]
Mathematical model helps investigate mechanisms involved in genesis of AF-related dementia

Mathematical model helps investigate mechanisms involved in genesis of AF-related dementia

Atrial fibrillation (AF), the most common cardiac arrhythmia, turns out to be a potential mechanism into the genesis of AF-related cognitive impairment/dementia. [More]
Study highlights need to improve end-of-life care for all patients with serious illnesses

Study highlights need to improve end-of-life care for all patients with serious illnesses

Historically, efforts to improve end-of-life care have focused primarily on patients with cancer. But few studies have looked at the quality of end-of-life care for patients with other serious illnesses, such as lung, kidney or heart failure or dementia. [More]
Study to assess effects of early dementia screening on families of older adults

Study to assess effects of early dementia screening on families of older adults

A new grant to the Indiana University Center for Aging Research from the National Institute on Aging funds the first study to assess the potential benefits and harms to family members of early dementia screening of older adults. [More]
University of Miami researchers awarded new contracts to detect genetic factors linked to Alzheimer's disease risk

University of Miami researchers awarded new contracts to detect genetic factors linked to Alzheimer's disease risk

Alzheimer's disease is the leading cause of dementia in the elderly and occurs in all ethnic and racial groups. It affects more than 5 million people age 65 and older in the United States alone and there is currently no effective treatment or cure. [More]
Study examines how frequently older adults with diagnosed and undiagnosed dementia perform unsafe activities

Study examines how frequently older adults with diagnosed and undiagnosed dementia perform unsafe activities

Dementia currently affects some 5 million people in the U.S., and that number is expected to triple by 2050. Having dementia affects the way you think, act, and make decisions. [More]
Long-term suppression of neurotransmitter acetylcholine may lead to dementia-like changes in the brain

Long-term suppression of neurotransmitter acetylcholine may lead to dementia-like changes in the brain

A new study from Western University is helping to explain why the long-term use of common anticholinergic drugs used to treat conditions like allergies and overactive bladder lead to an increased risk of developing dementia later in life. [More]
Higher late life cognitive reserve may help lower incidence, severity of delirium

Higher late life cognitive reserve may help lower incidence, severity of delirium

New research suggests that higher late life cognitive reserve—an ability to offset the losses associated with age- and disease-related changes in the brain—may help prevent delirium. [More]
Study shows Alzheimer's disease can lead to diabetes

Study shows Alzheimer's disease can lead to diabetes

Drugs used to treat diabetes could also be used to treat Alzheimer's disease, and vice versa, according to new research from the University of Aberdeen. [More]
Certain leisure activities may lower risk of post-operative delirium in older adults

Certain leisure activities may lower risk of post-operative delirium in older adults

Delirium, or the medical term for experiencing sudden confusion, is upsetting for both older adults and their families. In fact, it is one of the most common complications older adults face after surgery (a time often referred to as the "post-operative" period). [More]
Cerebral microbleeds linked to increased risk of physical, cognitive disability in MS patients

Cerebral microbleeds linked to increased risk of physical, cognitive disability in MS patients

Leaky blood vessels in the brain called cerebral microbleeds are associated with an increased risk of physical and cognitive disability in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a new study by researchers in the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo. [More]
Cerebral vessel disease increases Alzheimer's dementia risk

Cerebral vessel disease increases Alzheimer's dementia risk

Cerebral vessel disease may be an under-recognised risk factor for Alzheimer's disease dementia, say researchers. [More]
New technique may help replace brain cells, restore memory

New technique may help replace brain cells, restore memory

Although brains—even adult brains—are far more malleable than we used to think, they are eventually subject to age-related illnesses, like dementia, and loss of cognitive function. [More]
Risk factors differ for early and delayed dementia after ICH

Risk factors differ for early and delayed dementia after ICH

Acute haematoma parameters predict the onset of dementia in the first 6 months after intracerebral haemorrhage, but not that of delayed dementia, report researchers. [More]
Gist reasoning training can strengthen cognitive domains in individuals with MCI

Gist reasoning training can strengthen cognitive domains in individuals with MCI

New research from the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas shows that strategy-based reasoning training can improve the cognitive performance for those with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a preclinical stage of those at risk for Alzheimer's disease. [More]
New imaging study links tau proteins to neurodegenerative pathology of Alzheimer's disease

New imaging study links tau proteins to neurodegenerative pathology of Alzheimer's disease

Alzheimer's is a devastating and incurable disease marked by beta-amyloid and tau protein aggregations in the brain, yet the direct relationship between these proteins and neurodegeneration has remained a mystery. [More]
Measuring specific proteins in blood samples may help track progression of dementias

Measuring specific proteins in blood samples may help track progression of dementias

Reliable information can be obtained on the progression of dementias by measuring specific proteins in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid. A test of this kind is especially significant to the development of new therapies, as reported in the journal Neuron by scientists from the University of Basel and University Hospital Basel, along with international colleagues. [More]
New Cardiff University Brain Research Imaging Centre uses Siemens MRI systems for neuroimaging research

New Cardiff University Brain Research Imaging Centre uses Siemens MRI systems for neuroimaging research

Her Majesty the Queen has officially opened the Cardiff University Brain Research Imaging Centre, a unique neuroimaging research hub. [More]
New blood test helps detect MCI stage of Alzheimer's disease

New blood test helps detect MCI stage of Alzheimer's disease

A research team, led by Dr. Robert Nagele from Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine and Durin Technologies, Inc., has announced the development of a blood test that leverages the body's immune response system to detect an early stage of Alzheimer's disease - referred to as the mild cognitive impairment (MCI) stage - with unparalleled accuracy. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement