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Dementia is not a specific disease. It is a descriptive term for a collection of symptoms that can be caused by a number of disorders that affect the brain. People with dementia have significantly impaired intellectual functioning that interferes with normal activities and relationships. They also lose their ability to solve problems and maintain emotional control, and they may experience personality changes and behavioral problems, such as agitation, delusions, and hallucinations.
New article shows link between head injuries and neurodegenerative disease in rugby union players

New article shows link between head injuries and neurodegenerative disease in rugby union players

A new article publishing online today in the Quarterly Journal of Medicine has reported the first case showing an association between exposure to head injuries in rugby union players and an increased risk in neurodegenerative disease. [More]
Mayo Clinic scientists create mouse model of ALS, FTD caused by mutations in C9ORF72 gene

Mayo Clinic scientists create mouse model of ALS, FTD caused by mutations in C9ORF72 gene

Scientists at Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida created a novel mouse that exhibits the symptoms and neurodegeneration associated with the most common genetic forms of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, Lou Gehrig's disease), both of which are caused by a mutation in the a gene called C9ORF72. [More]
Studies refine amyloid imaging role in dementia

Studies refine amyloid imaging role in dementia

Two meta-analyses published in JAMA help to define the role of amyloid imaging in dementia. [More]
New study shows that infections can affect cognitive ability

New study shows that infections can affect cognitive ability

New research shows that infections can impair your cognitive ability measured on an IQ scale. The study is the largest of its kind to date, and it shows a clear correlation between infection levels and impaired cognition. [More]
Available research does not support link between chronic traumatic encephalopathy and sports

Available research does not support link between chronic traumatic encephalopathy and sports

Available research does not support the contention that athletes are uniquely at risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) or other neurodegenerative disorders, according to a review in the June issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. [More]
HQO report shows variations across Ontario's long-term care homes regarding antipsychotic drug use

HQO report shows variations across Ontario's long-term care homes regarding antipsychotic drug use

There are major differences across Ontario's long-term care homes in the percentage of residents who are being prescribed antipsychotic medications, according to Looking for Balance, a report from Health Quality Ontario, the provincial advisor on health care quality. [More]
vTv Therapeutics enrolls first patients in azeliragon Phase 3 trial for treatment of mild Alzheimer's disease

vTv Therapeutics enrolls first patients in azeliragon Phase 3 trial for treatment of mild Alzheimer's disease

vTv Therapeutics LLC today announced enrollment of the first patients into STEADFAST (Single Trial Evaluating Alzheimer's Disease Following Addition to Symptomatic Therapy), vTv's Phase 3 placebo controlled trial of azeliragon, an oral antagonist of the Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts (RAGE) for treatment of mild Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Growth of neuronal and vascular networks is controlled by same signaling molecules

Growth of neuronal and vascular networks is controlled by same signaling molecules

Neurons and blood vessels often traverse the body side by side, a fact observed as early as the 16th century by the Flemish anatomist Andreas Vesalius. Only over the last ten years, however, researchers have discovered that the growth of neuronal and vascular networks is controlled by the same molecules. [More]
Eating Mediterranean diet helps delay cognitive decline

Eating Mediterranean diet helps delay cognitive decline

Professor of Preventive Medicine at the University of Valencia Dolors Corella is part of the multidisciplinary team conducting the Predimed study, which has found that eating a Mediterranean diet, enriched with olive oil or nuts, helps delay cognitive decline. [More]
Repetitive head injuries may accelerate aging process, increase dementia risk

Repetitive head injuries may accelerate aging process, increase dementia risk

Repetitive head injuries that occur during contact sports and military service may accelerate the aging process by increasing the build-up of beta-amyloid in the brain, leading to worse disease and an increased likelihood of developing dementia. In particular, boxers fared the worst among athletes and military veterans with a history of head injuries. [More]
Study finds link between PTSD and accelerated aging

Study finds link between PTSD and accelerated aging

In recent years, public health concerns about post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have risen significantly, driven in part by affected military veterans returning from conflicts in the Middle East and elsewhere. PTSD is associated with number of psychological maladies, among them chronic depression, anger, insomnia, eating disorders and substance abuse. [More]
β-amyloid deposition highly variable in synucleinopathy

β-amyloid deposition highly variable in synucleinopathy

A meta-analysis suggests large variability in the prevalence of β-amyloid deposition in patients with synucleinopathies. [More]

Creating digital technology prototypes to improve dementia care

A health-inspired hackathon is taking place in Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, UK, with the aim of creating digital technology prototypes to support dementia care. Designers, coders, hackers and researchers are invited to take part in Create-4-Dementia on May 30th and 31st - the first public event of the Social Computing and Mental Health Research Network led by the University of Lincoln, UK, and funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. [More]

Roll-out of eMR-ABC software in Indiana may benefit older adults with dementia or depression

Older Indiana adults with dementia or depression will be among the best cared for elders in the nation beginning this month with the statewide roll-out of a unique automated decision-support system that enables their care coordinators to meet the complex bio-psychosocial needs of these individuals as well as those of their family members and other informal caregivers. [More]

New epilepsy drug holds promise as Alzheimer's treatment

University of British Columbia researchers say a new epilepsy drug holds promise as a treatment for Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Ground-breaking study characterizes early-stage Alzheimer's abnormalities in the intact brain

Ground-breaking study characterizes early-stage Alzheimer's abnormalities in the intact brain

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative condition that strikes at the heart of what makes us human: the ability to think, to feel, to remember and to communicate with those around us. The tragedy is compounded by the fact that there is currently no cure, no treatment, and no diagnostic method capable of identifying Alzheimer's at its early stages. [More]
Proteomics helps identify previously unrecognized proteins and pathways in nerve regeneration

Proteomics helps identify previously unrecognized proteins and pathways in nerve regeneration

Using proteomics techniques to study injured optic nerves, researchers at Boston Children's Hospital have identified previously unrecognized proteins and pathways involved in nerve regeneration. Adding back one of these proteins--the oncogene c-myc--they achieved unprecedented optic nerve regeneration in mice when combined with two other known strategies. [More]
Predominant first Alzheimer’s symptoms vary with diagnosis age

Predominant first Alzheimer’s symptoms vary with diagnosis age

The symptoms presented by patients newly diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease vary with age, with younger patients less likely to have initial memory problems, research shows. [More]
Promising compound blocks production of beta amyloid peptides in Alzheimer's mouse model

Promising compound blocks production of beta amyloid peptides in Alzheimer's mouse model

Offering a potential early intervention for Alzheimer's disease (AD), researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Cenna Biosciences, Inc. have identified compounds that block the production of beta amyloid peptides in mice. [More]
New study finds that challenging work tasks may have significant effect on brain health

New study finds that challenging work tasks may have significant effect on brain health

Professionals whose jobs require more speaking, developing strategies, conflict resolution and managerial tasks may experience better protection against memory and thinking decline in old age than their co-workers, according to a new study published in the April 29, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
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