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Dementia is not a specific disease. It is a descriptive term for a collection of symptoms that can be caused by a number of disorders that affect the brain. People with dementia have significantly impaired intellectual functioning that interferes with normal activities and relationships. They also lose their ability to solve problems and maintain emotional control, and they may experience personality changes and behavioral problems, such as agitation, delusions, and hallucinations.
GPS devices help dementia sufferers achieve increased sense of security, quality of life

GPS devices help dementia sufferers achieve increased sense of security, quality of life

A brand new study of 200 dementia sufferers in Norway reveals that almost all experience greater peace of mind and increased levels of physical activity using GPS devices. [More]
Prodromal Alzheimer’s phase ‘may span decades’

Prodromal Alzheimer’s phase ‘may span decades’

Marked reductions in cognitive performance are present up to 18 years before people develop Alzheimer’s disease dementia, research shows. [More]
Axovant Sciences accepts two presentations at Alzheimer's Association International Conference 2015

Axovant Sciences accepts two presentations at Alzheimer's Association International Conference 2015

Axovant Sciences Ltd., a leading clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the treatment of dementia, today announced the acceptance of two presentations at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference 2015 (AAIC) being held in Washington, D.C. from July 18-23, 2015. [More]
New survey sheds light on the way Americans think about their brain health, lifestyle habits

New survey sheds light on the way Americans think about their brain health, lifestyle habits

Is your brain important to you? Do you know how to keep it healthy? According to a recent survey conducted by Reader’s Digest in partnership with the Alzheimer’s Association, 91 percent of people believe they can reduce their risk of cognitive decline, but they have misconceptions about ways to keep their brains healthy. [More]
Two physician-scientists in search for better Alzheimer's disease treatment

Two physician-scientists in search for better Alzheimer's disease treatment

Two of the nation's leading physician-scientists in the search to better understand and treat Alzheimer's disease - William Mobley, MD, PhD, and Michael Rafii, MD, PhD - have been named interim co-directors of the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study (ADCS), a major initiative formed in 1991 as a cooperative agreement between the National Institute on Aging (NIA) and the University of California, San Diego. [More]
UC Riverside psychologist awarded NIA grant to study early influences on cognitive and physical health by middle age

UC Riverside psychologist awarded NIA grant to study early influences on cognitive and physical health by middle age

University of California, Riverside psychologist Chandra A. Reynolds has been awarded a $7 million, five-year grant by the National Institute on Aging to study how early childhood influences versus recent influences affect cognitive and physical health by middle age. [More]
Hartmuth Kolb named recipient of 2015 Alzheimer Award

Hartmuth Kolb named recipient of 2015 Alzheimer Award

The Journal of Alzheimer's Disease is proud to announce that Hartmuth Kolb, PhD, Head of Neuroscience Biomarkers, Johnson & Johnson, San Diego, CA, has been chosen as the recipient of the 2015 Alzheimer Award presented by the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease in recognition of his outstanding work on the importance and imaging of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). [More]
Errors on memory and thinking tests may signal Alzheimer's 18 years before diagnosis

Errors on memory and thinking tests may signal Alzheimer's 18 years before diagnosis

A new study suggests that errors on memory and thinking tests may signal Alzheimer's up to 18 years before the disease can be diagnosed. The research is published in the June 24, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Lund University research questions the doctrine on how the brain recognizes and processes information

Lund University research questions the doctrine on how the brain recognizes and processes information

New research from Lund University in Sweden questions the prevailing doctrine on how the brain absorbs and processes information. The idea that the brain has a mechanism to maintain activity at the lowest possible level is incorrect. [More]
Scientists redraw traditional brain map of language comprehension

Scientists redraw traditional brain map of language comprehension

For 140 years, scientists' understanding of language comprehension in the brain came from individuals with stroke. Based on language impairments caused by stroke, scientists believed a single area of the brain -- a hotdog shaped section in the temporal lobe of the left hemisphere called Wernicke's region -- was the center of language comprehension. [More]
NHS access - are you ready? An interview with Dr Keith Morris, Morris Healthcare Consulting

NHS access - are you ready? An interview with Dr Keith Morris, Morris Healthcare Consulting

The NHS is under immense pressure not only to continue to deliver improved care but also to change how it is delivering care to meet rising and changing demand with an essentially fixed amount of money and resources - all at the same time. Patience and persistence with good humour are thus vital characteristics to have. [More]
Pioglitazone drug significantly decreases risk of dementia

Pioglitazone drug significantly decreases risk of dementia

Patients with type 2 diabetes have a dysfunctional sugar metabolism because the essential hormone insulin does not work effectively. Once the disease reaches an advanced stage, the body stops producing insulin altogether, which means that it has to be administered externally. [More]
Hiroshima University researchers study promising biomarker for severity of ARWMCs, endothelial function

Hiroshima University researchers study promising biomarker for severity of ARWMCs, endothelial function

A promising biomarker for the severity of age-related white matter changes (ARWMCs) and endothelial function was evaluated at Hiroshima University, Japan. The relationship between this biomarker, the telomeric 3'-overhang (G-tail) length, and cardiovascular risk in humans is unclear so far. [More]
Scientists explore diabetes-cognitive decline link across cultures

Scientists explore diabetes-cognitive decline link across cultures

Diabetes is a known risk factor for cognitive decline and dementia, age-related conditions that affect memory and thinking skills. However, little is known about how the diabetes-cognitive decline link compares across cultures. [More]
Drug discovery experts receive £3m to find new treatments for Alzheimer's disease

Drug discovery experts receive £3m to find new treatments for Alzheimer's disease

Funding worth nearly half a million pounds will unite academics at the University of Southampton with drug discovery experts at the medical research charity MRC Technology, to target the immune system in the hunt for new treatments for Alzheimer's disease. [More]
ABC Medical Home program achieves significant health improvement for people with depression

ABC Medical Home program achieves significant health improvement for people with depression

The Aging Brain Care Medical Home, a novel population health management program implemented in the homes of older adults achieves significant health improvement for individuals with depression and also substantial stress reduction in family caregivers of dementia patients, according to a new study by investigators from the Regenstrief Institute, Indiana University Center for Aging Research and Eskenazi Health. [More]
Research explores screening methods, clinical care for patients with Alzheimer's and all forms of dementia

Research explores screening methods, clinical care for patients with Alzheimer's and all forms of dementia

Every 67 seconds someone is the United States develops Alzheimer's disease or some form of dementia. It's the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S. and it's the only cause of death in the top 10 in America that cannot be prevented, cured or slowed. This month, as the nation observes "Alzheimer's & Brain Awareness Month," James E. Galvin, M.D., M.P.H., one of the most prominent neuroscientists in the country, is at the helm of cutting-edge research, screening methods and clinical care for all forms of dementia and cognitive impairments as well as neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. [More]
Elder abuse common among community-dwelling older adults

Elder abuse common among community-dwelling older adults

A new global review reveals that elder abuse--which includes psychological, physical, and sexual abuse; neglect; and financial exploitation--is common among community-dwelling older adults and is especially prevalent among minority older adults. Older adults with cognitive and physical impairments or psychosocial distress are also at increased risk of elder abuse. [More]
Medical guidance lacking on how to care for elderly hip fracture patients with dementia

Medical guidance lacking on how to care for elderly hip fracture patients with dementia

Medical guidance on how to care for elderly people with dementia following a hip fracture is 'sadly lacking' according to researchers at the University of East Anglia. [More]
α-synuclein conformation may underlie neurodegenerative variability

α-synuclein conformation may underlie neurodegenerative variability

Varying structural conformations of α-synuclein may explain how one protein can give rise to distinct forms of neurodegeneration, say researchers. [More]
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