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Dementia is not a specific disease. It is a descriptive term for a collection of symptoms that can be caused by a number of disorders that affect the brain. People with dementia have significantly impaired intellectual functioning that interferes with normal activities and relationships. They also lose their ability to solve problems and maintain emotional control, and they may experience personality changes and behavioral problems, such as agitation, delusions, and hallucinations.
Clinical pharmacists in health care teams may improve quality, safety of patient care

Clinical pharmacists in health care teams may improve quality, safety of patient care

Problems related to elderly patients' medical drug treatments are widespread and commonly result in hospital admissions for people with dementia. New research shows that including clinical pharmacists in health care teams might improve the quality and safety of patient care and halve the risk of drug-related hospital readmissions. This according to a dissertation at Umea University in Sweden. [More]
Blocking blood supply of small cell lung cancer tumors may help delay cancer relapse

Blocking blood supply of small cell lung cancer tumors may help delay cancer relapse

A study by researchers at Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine has found that blocking the blood supply of small cell lung cancer tumors may help reduce their growth and delay the regrowth process after treatment. Small cell lung cancer is considered the most lethal of all lung cancers. [More]

Innovative activity toolkit aims to bring benefits to people living with dementia

The University of Stirling is supporting the development of an innovative activity toolkit to encourage creative activities among people living with dementia. [More]
Better oral hygiene, regular dental visits could slow down cognitive decline in older adults

Better oral hygiene, regular dental visits could slow down cognitive decline in older adults

Better oral hygiene and regular dental visits may play a role in slowing cognitive decline as people age, although evidence is not definitive enough to suggest that one causes the other. [More]
Researchers uncover vital clues of how the brain erases long term memories

Researchers uncover vital clues of how the brain erases long term memories

Vital clues about how the brain erases long term memories have been uncovered by researchers. The study in rats reveals how forgetting can be the result of an active deletion process rather than a failure to remember. [More]
Measuring brain signal variability could help identify patients at higher risk of dementia

Measuring brain signal variability could help identify patients at higher risk of dementia

Dementia will develop in about 80% of patients with Parkinson's disease, and a new study has found significant variability in brain signaling that could serve as a predictive marker for identifying which patients are at highest risk of dementia. [More]
Memory training with unpredictability more effective in enhancing episodic memory

Memory training with unpredictability more effective in enhancing episodic memory

Memory training with unpredictable components could be more effective in enhancing episodic memory than training with predictable elements, according to new findings from UT Dallas researchers published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology. [More]
Higher aortic stiffness associated with reduced white matter volume among young adults

Higher aortic stiffness associated with reduced white matter volume among young adults

A large, multi-center study led by the UC Davis School of Medicine for the first time has shown that people as young as their 40s have stiffening of the arteries that is associated with subtle structural damage to the brain that is implicated in cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease later in life. [More]
Study gives insight into reasons behind hospital deaths in older people

Study gives insight into reasons behind hospital deaths in older people

Despite the rates of hospital deaths in England declining, nearly two-thirds of people aged 85 and over, and more than half of people aged 95 and over still die in hospital, new research has found. [More]
Tooth loss leads to cognitive impairment, shows study

Tooth loss leads to cognitive impairment, shows study

The International and American Associations for Dental Research have published an article titled "Tooth Loss Increases the Risk of Diminished Cognitive Function: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis" in the OnlineFirst portion of the JDR Clinical & Translational Research. In it, Cerutti-Kopplin et al systematically assessed the association between oral health and cognitive function in adult populations. [More]
OHSU researchers link infrequent computer use, brain imaging signs in early-stage Alzheimer's patients

OHSU researchers link infrequent computer use, brain imaging signs in early-stage Alzheimer's patients

A new study sheds light on a powerful tool that may detect signs of Alzheimer's disease before patients show any symptoms of cognitive decline: the home computer. [More]
Unnecessary transitions can lead to increased health problems in older adults with dementia

Unnecessary transitions can lead to increased health problems in older adults with dementia

A transition is a physical move from one location to another with a stay of at least one night. For older adults, especially those with dementia, some transitions may be unavoidable and necessary. However, unnecessary transitions are linked to problems such as medication errors, hospital readmissions, and increased risk of death. [More]
Warning of increased mortality risk for PD patients taking antipsychotics

Warning of increased mortality risk for PD patients taking antipsychotics

Researchers have found a more than twofold increase in the risk of death among patients with Parkinson's disease who take antipsychotics, particularly typical antipsychotics. [More]
Women with Alzheimer’s disease have poorer cognitive abilities than men

Women with Alzheimer’s disease have poorer cognitive abilities than men

Women with Alzheimer’s have poorer cognitive abilities than men at the same stage of the disease, reveal academics from the University of Hertfordshire in a paper published in World Journal of Psychiatry today. [More]
NHS: a health service or an illness service? An interview with Dr Paula Crick

NHS: a health service or an illness service? An interview with Dr Paula Crick

I've been a nurse for almost 32 years and one of the things that has always been difficult for me to comprehend is that all too often we treat people who are sick, having missed opportunities to prevent, screen or intervene. [More]
Antipsychotic drugs may do significantly more harm to Parkinson's disease patients

Antipsychotic drugs may do significantly more harm to Parkinson's disease patients

At least half of Parkinson's disease patients experience psychosis at some point during the course of their illness, and physicians commonly prescribe antipsychotic drugs, such as quetiapine, to treat the condition. However, a new study by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Michigan Medical School, and the Philadelphia and Ann Arbor Veterans Affairs Medical Centers and suggests that these drugs may do significantly more harm in a subset of patients. [More]

NPS MedicineWise, Alzheimer’s Australia launch new campaign to support people living with dementia

Alzheimer’s Australia and NPS MedicineWise have today launched a new campaign to educate and empower people living with a diagnosis of dementia—and the people involved in their care—about their rights when it comes to treatment options associated with dementia. [More]
PERK inhibition can be a promising therapeutic strategy for neurodegenerative diseases

PERK inhibition can be a promising therapeutic strategy for neurodegenerative diseases

A major challenge in the field of neurodegeneration is the unclear understanding of neuronal dysfunction. Elucidation of these patho-mechanisms could result in the identification of novel therapeutic targets. In this article, Bell et al. present an exhaustive literature review highlighting the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) kinase PERK as a crucial contributor to systemic and neurodegenerative disorders. [More]
Brain's immune cells play direct role in development of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Brain's immune cells play direct role in development of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Cedars-Sinai research scientists have found that immune cells in the brain play a direct role in the development of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, offering hope for new therapies to target the neurodegenerative disease that gradually leads to paralysis and death. [More]
USF receives $9 million NIH grant to study unique treatment for age-related hearing loss

USF receives $9 million NIH grant to study unique treatment for age-related hearing loss

Researchers in the University of South Florida's Global Center for Hearing and Speech Research, recognized as the world's top research center for age-related hearing loss, have received a five-year, $9 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to study two unique ways to treat age-related hearing loss (ARHL). [More]
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