Dementia News and Research RSS Feed - Dementia News and Research

Dementia is not a specific disease. It is a descriptive term for a collection of symptoms that can be caused by a number of disorders that affect the brain. People with dementia have significantly impaired intellectual functioning that interferes with normal activities and relationships. They also lose their ability to solve problems and maintain emotional control, and they may experience personality changes and behavioral problems, such as agitation, delusions, and hallucinations.
Protein that plays key role in neurological diseases regulates neuronal communication by self-association

Protein that plays key role in neurological diseases regulates neuronal communication by self-association

The protein alpha-synuclein is a well-known player in Parkinson's disease and other related neurological conditions, such as dementia with Lewy bodies. Its normal functions, however, have long remained unknown. [More]
Research finding opens door to potential treatment for MPS IIIB

Research finding opens door to potential treatment for MPS IIIB

MPS IIIB is a devastating and currently untreatable disease that causes progressive damage to the brain, leading to profound intellectual disability, dementia and death -- often before reaching adulthood. [More]
Standard cognition test falls short in Parkinson’s disease patients

Standard cognition test falls short in Parkinson’s disease patients

There is a wide range of cognitive function, including dementia, among patients with Parkinson’s disease who are classed as cognitively normal on the Mini-Mental State Examination, research shows. [More]
Self-reported memory complaints are strong predictors of Alzheimer's later in life

Self-reported memory complaints are strong predictors of Alzheimer's later in life

New research by scientists at the University of Kentucky's Sanders-Brown Center on Aging suggests that people who notice their memory is slipping may be on to something. [More]
People with memory loss more likely to develop dementia later, study finds

People with memory loss more likely to develop dementia later, study finds

New research suggests that people without dementia who begin reporting memory issues may be more likely to develop dementia later, even if they have no clinical signs of the disease. [More]
Northwestern scientists develop first animal model for ALS dementia

Northwestern scientists develop first animal model for ALS dementia

The first animal model for ALS dementia, a form of ALS that also damages the brain, has been developed by Northwestern Medicine- scientists. The advance will allow researchers to directly see the brains of living mice, under anesthesia, at the microscopic level. This will allow direct monitoring of test drugs to determine if they work. [More]
Hospitals seek to control costs by setting standards for care

Hospitals seek to control costs by setting standards for care

One group in Delaware looked at high spending on cardiac monitoring for patients who really didn't need it and encouraged doctors to instead use guidelines from the American Heart Association. Costs fell by 70 percent for the monitoring, a study finds. [More]
Researchers demonstrate how Parkinson's disease spreads in the human brain

Researchers demonstrate how Parkinson's disease spreads in the human brain

An international, interdisciplinary group of researchers led by Gabor G. Kovacs from the Clinical Institute of Neurology at the MedUni Vienna has demonstrated, through the use of a new antibody, how Parkinson's disease spreads from cell to cell in the human brain. [More]
Experts to study how improved support for dementia carers can enhance quality of life

Experts to study how improved support for dementia carers can enhance quality of life

Experts will explore how improved support and powers for people caring for loved-ones with dementia can improve quality of life for both patients and carers around the UK. [More]
Simple test based on movement and thought can help identify Alzheimer's risk before signs of dementia

Simple test based on movement and thought can help identify Alzheimer's risk before signs of dementia

York University researchers say a simple test that combines thinking and movement can help to detect heightened risk for developing Alzheimer's disease in a person, even before there are any telltale behavioural signs of dementia. [More]
TauRx achieves target enrolment in second LMTX Phase III clinical trial for Alzheimer's disease

TauRx achieves target enrolment in second LMTX Phase III clinical trial for Alzheimer's disease

TauRx Therapeutics Ltd has achieved its target enrolment of 700 subjects with mild Alzheimer's disease into the second of its two Phase III clinical trials of LMTX, a tau aggregation inhibitor, for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Researchers discover key cell-signaling pathway that contributes to development of Alzheimer's disease

Researchers discover key cell-signaling pathway that contributes to development of Alzheimer's disease

Researchers at Jacksonville's campus of Mayo Clinic have discovered a defect in a key cell-signaling pathway they say contributes to both overproduction of toxic protein in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients as well as loss of communication between neurons - both significant contributors to this type of dementia. [More]
Research findings provide more details about earliest stages of neurodegenerative disease

Research findings provide more details about earliest stages of neurodegenerative disease

The link between a protein typically associated with Alzheimer's disease and its impact on memory and cognition may not be as clear as once thought, according to a new study from the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Waisman Center. [More]
UAB researchers discover novel mechanism involved in formation of memory, learning

UAB researchers discover novel mechanism involved in formation of memory, learning

Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham report the discovery of a novel mechanism in the brain involved in the formation of memory and learning. In findings reported online this week in Nature, the research team describes the role of a histone subunit known as H2A.Z. [More]
New method helps reveal secret dance of proteins

New method helps reveal secret dance of proteins

Staying clear of diseases requires that the proteins in our cells cooperate with one another. But, it has been a well-guarded secret how tens of thousands of different proteins find the correct dancing partners as they degrade and build up the human body, brain and nervous system. [More]
Research findings could help explain how some people stave off dementia

Research findings could help explain how some people stave off dementia

The human brain is capable of a neural workaround that compensates for the buildup of beta-amyloid, a destructive protein associated with Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley. [More]
Lilly, AstraZeneca partner to co-develop and commercialize potential Alzheimer's disease treatment

Lilly, AstraZeneca partner to co-develop and commercialize potential Alzheimer's disease treatment

Eli Lilly and Company and AstraZeneca today announced an agreement to co-develop and commercialize AZD3293, an oral beta secretase cleaving enzyme (BACE) inhibitor currently in development as a potential treatment for Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Adequate levels of vitamin E critical for young, elderly and pregnant women

Adequate levels of vitamin E critical for young, elderly and pregnant women

Amid conflicting reports about the need for vitamin E and how much is enough, a new analysis published today suggests that adequate levels of this essential micronutrient are especially critical for the very young, the elderly, and women who are or may become pregnant. [More]
Research roundup: Prevention services for seniors; drug shortages

Research roundup: Prevention services for seniors; drug shortages

This policy brief reports the findings of a systematic review conducted by the Community Health Innovations in Prevention for Seniors (CHIPS) project. ... Clinical preventive services such as colorectal cancer screening and pneumococcal immunization can help reduce rates of premature death and disability. Yet, many older adults are not receiving the full set of clinical preventive services that have been proven effective and are considered "high value" in terms of their costs per life saved. Rates are particularly low among racial and ethnic minority older adults compared to national goals. [More]
Study looks at blood type and risk of cognitive impairment

Study looks at blood type and risk of cognitive impairment

People with blood type AB may be more likely to develop memory loss in later years than people with other blood types, according to a study published in the September 10, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]