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Dementia is not a specific disease. It is a descriptive term for a collection of symptoms that can be caused by a number of disorders that affect the brain. People with dementia have significantly impaired intellectual functioning that interferes with normal activities and relationships. They also lose their ability to solve problems and maintain emotional control, and they may experience personality changes and behavioral problems, such as agitation, delusions, and hallucinations.
Physical activity seems to protect from dementia in old age

Physical activity seems to protect from dementia in old age

Physical activity in midlife seems to protect from dementia in old age, according to a study carried out at the University of Eastern Finland. Those who engaged in physical activity at least twice a week had a lower risk of dementia than those who were less active. [More]
New policies needed to address the growing demands of Alzheimer's disease

New policies needed to address the growing demands of Alzheimer's disease

To address the burgeoning demands of Alzheimer's disease that will affect generations, new policies will have to be adopted to acknowledge the complex and unique needs of people with dementia. [More]
White matter linked with cognitive health

White matter linked with cognitive health

A multidisciplinary group of scientists from the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging at the University of Kentucky have identified an interesting connection between the health of the brain tissue that supports cognitive functioning and the presence of dementia in adults with Down syndrome. [More]
Depression linked to poor self-management in patients with diabetes

Depression linked to poor self-management in patients with diabetes

Adult patients with diabetes who trust their medical provider and feel included in treatment decisions are significantly more likely to take and maintain a newly prescribed antidepressant medication, according to a new study in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. [More]
Taking care of grandkids one day a week helps keep grandmothers mentally sharp, shows study

Taking care of grandkids one day a week helps keep grandmothers mentally sharp, shows study

Taking care of grandkids one day a week helps keep grandmothers mentally sharp, finds a study from the Women's Healthy Aging Project study in Australia, published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). [More]
Healthy Aging Brain Center care model improves health outcomes and quality of care in older adults

Healthy Aging Brain Center care model improves health outcomes and quality of care in older adults

Studies have shown that a new patient and caregiver centered model of innovative, coordinated brain care for older adults improves health outcomes and quality of care for those with cognitive impairment. [More]

Tunstall, University of Leeds and Oxford University partner to find new evidence on benefits of telecare

Tunstall Healthcare, the leading provider of technology enabled care services, has partnered with the University of Leeds and Oxford University to address the challenges arising from population ageing and the opportunities of technological progress. [More]

Study: Seniors living in community with dementia are more likely to be hospitalized

Seniors living in the community who have dementia are more likely to be hospitalized and visit the emergency department than those who do not have dementia, according to a new study by researchers at RTI International. [More]

Green tea extract enhances cognitive functions in brain

Green tea is said to have many putative positive effects on health. Now, researchers at the University of Basel are reporting first evidence that green tea extract enhances the cognitive functions, in particular the working memory. [More]
1/3 of ICU patients develop depression that typically manifests as physical symptoms

1/3 of ICU patients develop depression that typically manifests as physical symptoms

A third of intensive care patients develop depression that typically manifests as physical, or somatic, symptoms such as weakness, appetite change, and fatigue, rather than psychological symptoms, according to one of the largest studies to investigate the mental health and functional outcomes of survivors of critical care, published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine. [More]
Study explores relationship between genetics and lifestyle in development of AD

Study explores relationship between genetics and lifestyle in development of AD

A global study involving more than one million people worldwide will explore the relationship between genetics and lifestyle in the development of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
UCSF/Daiichi Sankyo establish drug-discovery collaboration focused on neurodegenerative diseases

UCSF/Daiichi Sankyo establish drug-discovery collaboration focused on neurodegenerative diseases

Daiichi Sankyo Co., Ltd. (hereafter, Daiichi Sankyo) and UC San Francisco (UCSF) announced today that they have established a drug-discovery collaboration focused on developing novel therapeutics and molecular diagnostics for multiple neurodegenerative diseases. [More]
Young adults participated in cardio fitness activities may preserve memory, thinking skills in middle age

Young adults participated in cardio fitness activities may preserve memory, thinking skills in middle age

Young adults who run or participate in other cardio fitness activities may preserve their memory and thinking skills in middle age, according to a new study published in the April 2, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Middle age was defined as ages 43 to 55. [More]
New research implicates that RNA processing is central to ALS disease process

New research implicates that RNA processing is central to ALS disease process

In work supported by The ALS Association, researchers have discovered a new ALS-causing gene and have linked its function to that of another prominent disease gene. The study was published in the journal Nature Neuroscience. [More]

Young adults with cardiac risk factors have worse cognitive function in middle age

Young adults with such cardiac risk factors as high blood pressure and elevated glucose levels have significantly worse cognitive function in middle age, according to a new study by dementia researchers at UC San Francisco. [More]

Study seeks to adapt multi-family group treatment approach for people with spinal cord injury

Every year, more than 12,000 Americans-mostly young men-suffer spinal cord injuries in car crashes, falls, sports and acts of violence. Those dealing with this life-changing condition may soon have a better way to cope, thanks to a new collaborative research project by Washington State University Spokane and St. Luke's Rehabilitation Institute. [More]

Cogstate's cognition test to play key role in A4 trial for Alzheimer’s disease

Cognition testing technology developed by Cogstate will be used to track the neurological health of elderly people involved in the multinational Phase III clinical trial of a promising new Alzheimer’s disease (AD) drug. [More]

Adult day care services may protect family caregivers against harmful effects of stress

Family caregivers show an increase in the beneficial stress hormone DHEA-S on days when they use an adult day care service for their relatives with dementia, according to researchers at Penn State and the University of Texas at Austin. [More]

Viewpoints: Predictions of rising premiums in 2015; anniversary of health law

No one challenges reality like Kathleen Sebelius, who assured the world on Sept. 30, 2013 that the Affordable Care Act website would be open for business the next day. "We're very excited about tomorrow," Sebelius said. "Shutdown or no shutdown, we're ready to go." [More]
New treatment could halt progression of dementia

New treatment could halt progression of dementia

Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have discovered a way to potentially halt the progression of dementia caused by accumulation of a protein known as tau. [More]