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Dementia is not a specific disease. It is a descriptive term for a collection of symptoms that can be caused by a number of disorders that affect the brain. People with dementia have significantly impaired intellectual functioning that interferes with normal activities and relationships. They also lose their ability to solve problems and maintain emotional control, and they may experience personality changes and behavioral problems, such as agitation, delusions, and hallucinations.
Persons with reduced levels of TREM2 protein at greater risk for neurodegenerative diseases

Persons with reduced levels of TREM2 protein at greater risk for neurodegenerative diseases

Persons with reduced levels of the TREM2 protein could be at greater risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease or frontotemporal dementia, according to an international study which included the participation of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona and the Sant Pau Biomedical Research Institute. [More]
Nutrition screenings should be mandatory part of comprehensive geriatric analysis

Nutrition screenings should be mandatory part of comprehensive geriatric analysis

As older adults typically have one or more chronic health conditions that can affect dietary intake, malnutrition has been identified as a serious problem in older adults. This has given rise to the recommendation that nutrition screenings be a mandatory part of the comprehensive geriatric analysis (CGA). [More]
Regular walking may ease Parkinson's symptoms

Regular walking may ease Parkinson's symptoms

People with mild to moderate Parkinson's disease who regularly walk for exercise may improve their motor function, mood, tiredness, fitness and some aspects of thinking abilities, according to a study published in the July 2, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
More music therapists needed in psychiatric health care, says researcher

More music therapists needed in psychiatric health care, says researcher

Music can help those without the means to express themselves to communicate. There is a need for more music therapists in psychiatric health care, says researcher Karin Mössler at Uni Research in Bergen, Norway. [More]
Short sleep linked to cognitive decline in older adults

Short sleep linked to cognitive decline in older adults

Researchers at Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore (Duke-NUS) have found evidence that the less older adults sleep, the faster their brains age. [More]
Viewpoints: Nothing in health care is free; Obamacare opponents lack facts; 'Nurse Jackie' and the ER

Viewpoints: Nothing in health care is free; Obamacare opponents lack facts; 'Nurse Jackie' and the ER

The Department of Health and Human Services released a report Friday declaring that 76 million Americans with private insurance became eligible for more preventive services with no out-of-pocket fees as a result of the 2010 healthcare law, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (a.k.a. Obamacare). Because Democrats are counting on female voters to help them at the polls in November, the report highlighted how women had been helped by that aspect of Obamacare. [More]
EMA CHMP recommends marketing authorization for GE's VIZAMYL for PET imaging to detect beta amyloids

EMA CHMP recommends marketing authorization for GE's VIZAMYL for PET imaging to detect beta amyloids

GE Healthcare today announced the receipt of a positive opinion from the European Medicines Agency's Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use. This opinion recommends the granting of a marketing authorisation for VIZAMYL (Flutemetamol F18 injection), a radiopharmaceutical medicinal product indicated for Positron Emission Tomography imaging of beta amyloid neuritic plaque density in the brains of adult patients with cognitive impairment who are being evaluated for Alzheimer's disease and other causes of cognitive impairment. [More]
Increasing clearance of ALS misfolded protein from neurons improves their survival

Increasing clearance of ALS misfolded protein from neurons improves their survival

In work supported by The ALS Association, researchers have shown that increasing the clearance of misfolded protein from neurons improves their survival. The study was published today in the journal Nature Chemical Biology. [More]
Janssen seeks expanded approval of VELCADE from EU for Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Janssen seeks expanded approval of VELCADE from EU for Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Janssen-Cilag International NV today announced its submission of a type II variation to the European Medicines Agency to expand the label for VELCADE (bortezomib) to include its use, in combination with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and prednisone, for the treatment of adult patients with previously untreated Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL). [More]
Sleep problems associated with worse memory and executive function in older people

Sleep problems associated with worse memory and executive function in older people

Research published today in PLOS ONE by researchers at the University of Warwick indicates that sleep problems are associated with worse memory and executive function in older people. [More]
Research roundup: Role of primary care in reducing readmissions; air transport for wounded soldiers; hospital prices

Research roundup: Role of primary care in reducing readmissions; air transport for wounded soldiers; hospital prices

Follow-up with a primary care provider (PCP) in addition to the surgical team is routinely recommended to patients discharged after major surgery despite no clear evidence that it improves outcomes. [More]
Study explores prevalence of chronic brain damage in retired NFL players

Study explores prevalence of chronic brain damage in retired NFL players

A study published online today in Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach provides a different take on previous information regarding the prevalence of chronic brain damage in retired NFL players. [More]
Veterans with traumatic brain injury more likely to develop dementia in later life

Veterans with traumatic brain injury more likely to develop dementia in later life

Older veterans who have experienced a traumatic brain injury (TBI) are 60 percent more likely to later develop dementia than veterans without TBI, according to a study published in the June 25, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]

Opal Aged Care signs agreement to acquire Stockland's aged care portfolio

Today, Opal Aged Care (formerly Domain Principal Group) and Stockland announced an agreement for Opal Aged Care to acquire Stockland's aged care portfolio. The acquisition signals the start of a longer term partnership through cooperation on future co-located retirement living and aged care sites. [More]
Research finding could open new opportunities for treating Huntington's disease

Research finding could open new opportunities for treating Huntington's disease

Researchers believe they have learned how mutations in the gene that causes Huntington's disease kill brain cells, a finding that could open new opportunities for treating the fatal disorder. Scientists first linked the gene to the inherited disease more than 20 years ago [More]
Cocoa-extract may reduce damage to nerve pathways in Alzheimer's patients' brains

Cocoa-extract may reduce damage to nerve pathways in Alzheimer's patients' brains

A specific preparation of cocoa-extract called Lavado may reduce damage to nerve pathways seen in Alzheimer's disease patients' brains long before they develop symptoms, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published June 20 in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease (JAD). [More]
Viewpoints: Concerns about ACOs; problems in Va. gov.'s strategy; Medicaid 'black hole'

Viewpoints: Concerns about ACOs; problems in Va. gov.'s strategy; Medicaid 'black hole'

Although Obamacare's health insurance expansion has directly provided coverage to only about 4 percent of Americans, changes embedded in the Affordable Care Act could affect many more people, and not always in good ways. [More]
Women who develop gestational diabetes perform worse on cognitive function tests

Women who develop gestational diabetes perform worse on cognitive function tests

Women who develop diabetes during pregnancy, called gestational diabetes, perform worse on cognitive function tests than do women with a normal pregnancy, according to a new study from Turkey. [More]
Long-term care for soaring numbers of people with dementia need to be improved, says new RAND study

Long-term care for soaring numbers of people with dementia need to be improved, says new RAND study

As millions of Americans struggle to help loved ones with dementia, policymakers should consider more ways to improve long-term services and supports for the soaring numbers of people with the debilitating condition and their caregivers, a new RAND Corporation study says -- and it offers possible ways to do so. [More]
LBDA offers condolences over death of LBD patient

LBDA offers condolences over death of LBD patient

The sad news of Casey Kasem's illness and passing has brought unexpected visibility to a disease unfamiliar to many people. [More]