Dementia News and Research RSS Feed - Dementia News and Research

Dementia is not a specific disease. It is a descriptive term for a collection of symptoms that can be caused by a number of disorders that affect the brain. People with dementia have significantly impaired intellectual functioning that interferes with normal activities and relationships. They also lose their ability to solve problems and maintain emotional control, and they may experience personality changes and behavioral problems, such as agitation, delusions, and hallucinations.
New study heightens concerns over the detrimental impact of APOE ε4 in urban children

New study heightens concerns over the detrimental impact of APOE ε4 in urban children

A new study by researchers at the Universities of Montana, Carleton, and North Carolina, and the Centro de Ciencias de la Atmósfera, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, heightens concerns over the detrimental impact of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele -- the most prevalent genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease -- upon cognition, olfaction, and metabolic brain indices in healthy urban children and teens. [More]
New study shows that the body's immune system may be able to clear Alzheimer's-associated plaques

New study shows that the body's immune system may be able to clear Alzheimer's-associated plaques

New research from scientists at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California shows that the body's immune system may be able to clear the brain of toxic plaque build-up that is the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, reversing memory loss and brain cell damage. [More]
Meditation appears to help preserve the brain's gray matter

Meditation appears to help preserve the brain's gray matter

Since 1970, life expectancy around the world has risen dramatically, with people living more than 10 years longer. That's the good news. [More]
Hockey legend diagnosed with suspected Lewy body dementia

Hockey legend diagnosed with suspected Lewy body dementia

The sad news of hockey legend Stan Mikita's illness has brought unexpected visibility to a disease unfamiliar to many people. [More]
SuperAgers have distinctly different looking brains

SuperAgers have distinctly different looking brains

SuperAgers, aged 80 and above, have distinctly different looking brains than those of normal older people, according to new Northwestern Medicine research that is beginning to reveal why the memories of these cognitively elite elders don't suffer the usual ravages of time. [More]
Cooking foods at high temperatures increases Alzheimer's risk

Cooking foods at high temperatures increases Alzheimer's risk

Our new paper published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease provides evidence that cooking foods at high temperatures increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease. This study looked at the content of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in national diets and clinical studies comparing and compared total AGEs to Alzheimer's disease rates. [More]
Free dementia workshops to be held at Houston's Alzheimer's Association

Free dementia workshops to be held at Houston's Alzheimer's Association

Since December 2003, Marsene Boldt, RN, has been providing care services for Houston area residents with her At Your Side Home Care location at 16868 Royal Crest Dr. [More]

JetFuel Technologies, Valtronic team up to reduce brain injuries

Valtronic develops partnerships built on the creation of innovative ideas, technology, and positive outcomes for all. [More]
Scientists reveal mechanism underlying cellular degeneration of upper motor neurons

Scientists reveal mechanism underlying cellular degeneration of upper motor neurons

For the first time, scientists have revealed a mechanism underlying the cellular degeneration of upper motor neurons, a small group of neurons in the brain recently shown to play a major role in ALS pathology. [More]
BTH to develop new technologies to improve quality of life for elderly people with mild dementia

BTH to develop new technologies to improve quality of life for elderly people with mild dementia

Blekinge Institute of Technology in Sweden will receive 10 million SEK to develop new technologies that will increase the quality of life for elderly people with mild dementia. The technology, IT support via e-readers, will also facilitate for the relatives. [More]
Gradual smoking cessation may be key for quitting

Gradual smoking cessation may be key for quitting

Smoking is harmful in almost every respect. Cancer, stroke, and other cardiovascular diseases are just a small part of a well-documented portfolio of serious consequences of smoking. [More]
People who carry longevity gene variant have larger brain region

People who carry longevity gene variant have larger brain region

People who carry a variant of a gene that is associated with longevity also have larger volumes in a front part of the brain involved in planning and decision-making, according to researchers at UC San Francisco. [More]
ADDF awards grant to support initiation of AGB101 Phase 3 trial for aMCI treatment

ADDF awards grant to support initiation of AGB101 Phase 3 trial for aMCI treatment

The Alzheimer's Drug Discovery Foundation announced today a $900,000 grant to AgeneBio, a pharmaceutical company developing innovative therapies for neurologic and psychiatric diseases. The grant will support the initiation of an FDA-registered Phase 3 clinical trial of AGB101, a new therapeutic treatment for amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). [More]
Alzheimer's Association announces new research grants to study potential drug therapies

Alzheimer's Association announces new research grants to study potential drug therapies

Many academic researchers and pharmaceutical companies have identified new Alzheimer's drug therapy candidates, but lack the funding to move them into human testing. At the same time, few funding sources support early-phase clinical drug trials. As a result, too many promising studies stall out early in the discovery process. [More]
Researchers probe possibility of reversing medications' adverse cognitive effects

Researchers probe possibility of reversing medications' adverse cognitive effects

Whether the adverse cognitive effects of medications can be reversed is of significant importance to an aging population, their caregivers and their families, as well as to an overburdened health care system. [More]
USC neuroscientists find potential prevention for Alzheimer's disease

USC neuroscientists find potential prevention for Alzheimer's disease

University of Southern California neuroscientists may have unlocked another puzzle to preventing risks that can lead to Alzheimer's disease. Researchers at Keck Medicine of USC used high-resolution imaging of the living human brain to show for the first time that the brain's protective blood barrier becomes leaky with age, starting at the hippocampus, a critical learning and memory center that is damaged by Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Alzheimer's drug Aricept (donepezil) linked to serious side effects

Alzheimer's drug Aricept (donepezil) linked to serious side effects

New warnings have been added to the prescribing information for the Alzheimer's drug Aricept (donepezil) advising of the risk of two rare but potentially serious conditions: muscle breakdown (rhabdomyolysis) and a neurological disorder called neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS). [More]
Walnuts may improve cognitive function

Walnuts may improve cognitive function

Eating walnuts may improve performance on cognitive function tests, including those for memory, concentration and information processing speed according to new research from the David Geffen School of Medicine at The University of California, Los Angeles, led by Dr. Lenore Arab. Cognitive function was consistently greater in adult participants that consumed walnuts, regardless of age, gender or ethnicity. [More]
MU researcher develops intervention to help older adults gradually adjust to hearing aids

MU researcher develops intervention to help older adults gradually adjust to hearing aids

When individuals wear their hearing aids for the first time, they are flooded with sounds they have not heard in months or years; yet, previous research has shown that not all new sounds are welcomed. Ambient noises such as air conditioners, wind and background conversations can be painful, irritating and difficult to ignore, causing some individuals to stop using their hearing aids right away. [More]
Joining a walking group helps boost overall health

Joining a walking group helps boost overall health

Joining a walking group is one of the best and easiest ways to boost overall health, with virtually no side effects, suggests an analysis of the available evidence, published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. [More]