Dementia News and Research RSS Feed - Dementia News and Research

Dementia is not a specific disease. It is a descriptive term for a collection of symptoms that can be caused by a number of disorders that affect the brain. People with dementia have significantly impaired intellectual functioning that interferes with normal activities and relationships. They also lose their ability to solve problems and maintain emotional control, and they may experience personality changes and behavioral problems, such as agitation, delusions, and hallucinations.
Preventing falls in care homes: an interview with Professor Pip Logan

Preventing falls in care homes: an interview with Professor Pip Logan

Older people living in care homes fall three times more frequently than individuals who still live in their own homes. There is often debate over the idea of people going into care homes as a solution to the fact they are falling at home but they can still fall in the care home. [More]
Healthy eating, exercise, and brain-training programme results in slower mental decline for older people

Healthy eating, exercise, and brain-training programme results in slower mental decline for older people

A comprehensive programme providing older people at risk of dementia with healthy eating guidance, exercise, brain training, and management of metabolic and vascular risk factors appears to slow down cognitive decline, according to the first ever randomised controlled trial of its kind, published in The Lancet. [More]
Yale researchers test new device that protects patients' brain during heart-valve replacement procedure

Yale researchers test new device that protects patients' brain during heart-valve replacement procedure

In the first multicenter trial of its kind, Yale researchers tested a new device that lowers the risk of stroke and cognitive decline in patients undergoing heart-valve replacement. [More]
Randomised trial puts FINGER on cognitive health

Randomised trial puts FINGER on cognitive health

The FINGER study, the first large randomised, controlled trial of its kind, suggests that a multifactorial intervention could slow cognitive decline in elderly people at risk of developing dementia. [More]
Gene variant may help predict people’s response to investigational Alzheimer's therapy

Gene variant may help predict people’s response to investigational Alzheimer's therapy

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a gene variant that may be used to predict people most likely to respond to an investigational therapy under development for Alzheimer's disease (AD). [More]
Non-invasive ultrasound technology can treat Alzheimer's disease, restore memory

Non-invasive ultrasound technology can treat Alzheimer's disease, restore memory

Queensland scientists have found that non-invasive ultrasound technology can be used to treat Alzheimer's disease and restore memory. [More]
Existing epilepsy drug reverses aMCI in elderly patients at risk for Alzheimer's disease

Existing epilepsy drug reverses aMCI in elderly patients at risk for Alzheimer's disease

A novel therapeutic approach for an existing drug reverses a condition in elderly patients who are at high risk for dementia due to Alzheimer's disease, researchers at Johns Hopkins University found. [More]
Deutsches Ärzteblatt International's current issue features two articles on geriatric medicine

Deutsches Ärzteblatt International's current issue features two articles on geriatric medicine

Very old persons often have chronic problems, such as physical immobility, unsteady gait, and mental impairments. In such patients, these risks have to be considered and their treatments adapted accordingly. Deutsches Ärzteblatt International in its current issue introduces two original articles on the subject of geriatric medicine. [More]
Simple blood test could be developed to diagnose Alzheimer's disease, say UCLA researchers

Simple blood test could be developed to diagnose Alzheimer's disease, say UCLA researchers

UCLA researchers have provided the first evidence that a simple blood test could be developed to confirm the presence of beta amyloid proteins in the brain, which is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Two researchers to receive Potamkin Prize for research on Alzheimer's disease

Two researchers to receive Potamkin Prize for research on Alzheimer's disease

The American Academy of Neurology and the American Brain Foundation are awarding the 2015 Potamkin Prize for Research in Pick's, Alzheimer's and Related Diseases to Peter Davies, PhD, of the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research in Manhasset, NY, and Reisa A. Sperling, MD, of the Brigham and Women's Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. [More]
McGill researchers discover key epigenetic factor that controls development of hippocampus

McGill researchers discover key epigenetic factor that controls development of hippocampus

McGill researchers have discovered, for the first time, the importance of a key epigenetic regulator in the development of the hippocampus, a part of the brain associated with learning, memory and neural stem cells. [More]
New medical innovations to be presented at Royal Society of Medicine summit

New medical innovations to be presented at Royal Society of Medicine summit

A super-slim wearable sensor developed by sixteen-year old school student Kenneth Shinozuka from the US will be one of the highlights at the Spring medical innovations summit at the Royal Society of Medicine on Saturday 18 April. [More]
The Brain Prize awarded to four scientists for development of two-photon microscopy

The Brain Prize awarded to four scientists for development of two-photon microscopy

The world's most valuable (€1m) neuroscience prize, The Brain Prize has been awarded, to four scientists, Winfried Denk and Arthur Konnerth (Germany), and Karel Svoboda and David Tank (USA), for the invention and development of two-photon microscopy, a transformative tool in brain research. [More]
Study shows how mutations that cause Alzheimer's disease lead to neurodegeneration, dementia

Study shows how mutations that cause Alzheimer's disease lead to neurodegeneration, dementia

A study from researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital reveals for the first time exactly how mutations associated with the most common form of inherited Alzheimer's disease produce the disorder's devastating effects. [More]
Non-drug approaches work better in people with Alzheimer's disease, dementia

Non-drug approaches work better in people with Alzheimer's disease, dementia

Doctors write millions of prescriptions a year for drugs to calm the behavior of people with Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia. But non-drug approaches actually work better, and carry far fewer risks, experts conclude in a new report. [More]
Study associates heart function with development of Alzheimer's disease

Study associates heart function with development of Alzheimer's disease

A healthier heart could prevent Alzheimer's disease, according to new research at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. [More]
Anxiety and déjà vu: an interview with Dr Christine Wells, Sheffield Hallam University

Anxiety and déjà vu: an interview with Dr Christine Wells, Sheffield Hallam University

It’s thought that the neural basis of déjà vu is located in the temporal lobes, a region of the brain strongly associated with the storage and retrieval of memories. One source of support for this is evidence from individuals with temporal lobe epilepsy, some of whom experience déjà vu episodes as part of seizure-related auras... [More]
TREM2 protein may help slow progression of multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease

TREM2 protein may help slow progression of multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease

Highlighting a potential target in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) and Alzheimer's disease, new research suggests that triggering a protein found on the surface of brain cells may help slow the progression of these and other neurological diseases. [More]
Anticholinergic medications associated with pneumonia risk in older people

Anticholinergic medications associated with pneumonia risk in older people

Taking commonly used medications with anticholinergic effects is associated with a significantly higher risk for developing pneumonia in a study of more than 3,000 older Group Health patients living in the community--not in nursing homes. [More]
UC San Diego Health System's Movement Disorder Center joins NPF Center of Excellence network

UC San Diego Health System's Movement Disorder Center joins NPF Center of Excellence network

The Movement Disorder Center at UC San Diego Health System has been designated the 41st Center of Excellence in the National Parkinson Foundation's global network. This designation is the highest recognition offered by NPF to a Parkinson's specialty clinic. It represents the consensus of leaders in the field that the UC San Diego program is among the world's leading centers for Parkinson's research, outreach and care. [More]
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