Dentistry News and Research RSS Feed - Dentistry News and Research

Researchers reveal differing perceptions among people at-risk for diabetes

Researchers reveal differing perceptions among people at-risk for diabetes

Recent research published in by Dr. Shiela Strauss, associate professor of nursing and co-director of the Statistics and Data Management Core for NYU's Colleges of Nursing and Dentistry, along with a team of NYU researchers, reveals differing perceptions among adult populations at-risk for diabetes that may offer new approaches to diabetes education and prevention. [More]
Plaque can be used to predict, identify and treat diseases, say researchers

Plaque can be used to predict, identify and treat diseases, say researchers

Scraped from the gums, teeth and tongue in the form of plaque, the researchers behind Canada's first plaque bank are betting that the bacterial content of plaque will open up a new frontier of medicine. [More]
U-M researchers make major breakthrough in diagnosing, treating prostate cancer

U-M researchers make major breakthrough in diagnosing, treating prostate cancer

University of Michigan researchers have discovered a biomarker that may be a potentially important breakthrough in diagnosing and treating prostate cancer. [More]
Plymouth researchers receive grant to develop effective therapy for Huntington's disease

Plymouth researchers receive grant to develop effective therapy for Huntington's disease

Huntington's disease is an hereditary disorder of the nervous system caused by a faulty gene on chromosome four. The faulty gene leads to nerve damage in the area of the brain resulting in gradual physical, mental and emotional changes. Those born to a parent with Huntington's disease have a 50:50 chance of developing it, and there is currently no cure. [More]
Oral, Head & Neck Cancer Awareness Week: Mount Sinai experts to share tips on cancer prevention

Oral, Head & Neck Cancer Awareness Week: Mount Sinai experts to share tips on cancer prevention

Mouth and throat cancers are the fastest rising cancers today. They account for over 40,000 cases per year in the U.S. The American Cancer Society estimates that there will be 121,790 new cases of head and neck cancer diagnosed in 2015 and 14,240 deaths. These numbers include tongue cancer, throat cancers caused by the human papillomavirus or HPV, voice box cancer, melanoma of the face and thyroid cancers. [More]
Researchers reveal molecular structure of cytotoxin from Mycoplasma pneumoniae

Researchers reveal molecular structure of cytotoxin from Mycoplasma pneumoniae

Researchers from the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio today revealed the molecular structure of the cytotoxin from Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a widespread, highly contagious bacterium that infects the lungs. [More]
Symposium to highlight latest thinking related to obesity

Symposium to highlight latest thinking related to obesity

The 15th Plymouth Obesity, Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome Symposium will take place at Plymouth Postgraduate Medical Centre on 21st May. [More]
Dental experts join Oral Cancer Foundation to raise awareness about oral cancer

Dental experts join Oral Cancer Foundation to raise awareness about oral cancer

When oral and oropharyngeal cancers (cancers of the mouth and upper throat) are detected and treated early in their development, survival rates can improve significantly. Regular oral cancer examinations performed by your oral health professional remain the best method for detecting oral cancer in its early stages. [More]
Scientists isolate energy-burning 'beige' fat from adult humans

Scientists isolate energy-burning 'beige' fat from adult humans

For the first time, a research team, led by a UC San Francisco biologist, has isolated energy-burning "beige" fat from adult humans, which is known to be able to convert unhealthy white fat into healthy brown fat. The scientists also found new genetic markers of this beige fat. [More]
Combined therapy boosts growth in short children with low IGF-1

Combined therapy boosts growth in short children with low IGF-1

Children with short stature benefit from receiving combined treatment with growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1, if they have low endogenous levels of the latter, a study shows. [More]
EnteroMedics, American HealthCare Lending partner to support patient access to vBloc Therapy

EnteroMedics, American HealthCare Lending partner to support patient access to vBloc Therapy

EnteroMedics Inc., the developer of medical devices using neuroblocking technology to treat obesity, metabolic diseases and other gastrointestinal disorders, today announced that the Company has entered into a partnership with American HealthCare Lending to provide funding for patient access to vBloc Therapy, delivered via the Maestro Rechargeable System, for the treatment of obesity. [More]
Aspen Dental to open five new locations in Arkansas in 2015

Aspen Dental to open five new locations in Arkansas in 2015

Access to dental care in Arkansas is about to get a healthy boost with the addition of five new Aspen Dental–branded practices, the first of which will open in Searcy and Jonesboro on Thursday, April 9. [More]
Workplace wellness programs can help people lose weight

Workplace wellness programs can help people lose weight

A new study shows that workplace wellness programs can be effective in helping people lose weight by providing healthier food choices and increasing opportunities for physical activity, particularly if these efforts are designed with the input and active participation of employees. [More]
Queen's University Belfast, NCI partners to provide 4 year PhD programme in Precision Cancer Medicine

Queen's University Belfast, NCI partners to provide 4 year PhD programme in Precision Cancer Medicine

Queen's University Belfast is leading a major new international initiative into modern cancer care medicine which was announced today in Washington D.C. [More]
UAB scientist explores the bone development function of runx2 gene

UAB scientist explores the bone development function of runx2 gene

Amjad Javed, Ph.D., of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, has taken a major step forward in understanding the bone development function of a gene called runx2, which could lead to future ways to speed bone healing, aid bone bioengineering, stem osteoporosis and reduce arthritis. [More]
NYUCD receives NIH grant to develop POC test to detect HIV antibodies and viral RNA

NYUCD receives NIH grant to develop POC test to detect HIV antibodies and viral RNA

New York University College of Dentistry has received a sub-award in the amount of $335,000 from a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II grant from the National Institutes of Health to complete the development of a fully automated self-confirming assay that can simultaneously detect HIV/AIDS antibodies and viral RNA from the AIDS virus in a single specimen. [More]
Stopping cellular quality-control mechanism can make chemotherapy more effective

Stopping cellular quality-control mechanism can make chemotherapy more effective

A University of Rochester team found a way to make chemotherapy more effective, by stopping a cellular quality-control mechanism, according to a study published today in Nature Communications. [More]
CMV-based vaccine provides long-lasting protective immunity against Ebola virus

CMV-based vaccine provides long-lasting protective immunity against Ebola virus

A cytomegalovirus (CMV)-based vaccine provides long-lasting protective immunity against Ebola virus, and has potential for development as a disseminating vaccine strategy to prevent ebolavirus infection of wild African ape populations. [More]
Pain diaries may affect recovery of patients suffering from chronic pain

Pain diaries may affect recovery of patients suffering from chronic pain

For some people suffering from chronic pain, part of their daily routine is recording the extent of it in a pain diary. Often done at the request of their physician or therapist, patients may be asked to record how severe the pain is, how it affects daily activities and which treatments ease it or make it worse. [More]
Survey: Number of UK adults living with cystic fibrosis expected to increase by 2025

Survey: Number of UK adults living with cystic fibrosis expected to increase by 2025

The number of people living with cystic fibrosis into adulthood in the UK is expected to increase dramatically - by as much as 80 per cent - by 2025, according to a Europe-wide survey, the UK end of which was led by Queen's University Belfast. [More]
Advertisement