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Gut-directed hypnosis more effective for treating irritable bowel syndrome

Gut-directed hypnosis more effective for treating irritable bowel syndrome

Therapeutic hypnosis is an effective and safe complementary technique in surgery and the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. This is the conclusion of a systematic review by Winfried Häuser and his co-authors in the latest issue of Deutsches Ärzteblatt International. [More]
Basic mechanisms behind memory are more dynamic, research finds

Basic mechanisms behind memory are more dynamic, research finds

We tend to think our memory works like a filing cabinet. We experience an event, generate a memory and then file it away for later use. However, according to medical research, the basic mechanisms behind memory are much more dynamic. [More]
Exposure to BBP can make babies obese even before they are born

Exposure to BBP can make babies obese even before they are born

Benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP), a chemical commonly used in the food manufacturing process, can increase fat stores in the body even before we're born, according to a new study published in the Journal of Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology. [More]
High levels of secretin hormone may play vital role in management of chronic liver diseases

High levels of secretin hormone may play vital role in management of chronic liver diseases

High levels of a digestive hormone called secretin may play an important role in the management of certain chronic liver diseases, according to new research published in the journal Hepatology. These findings could result in new ways to treat cholestatic liver diseases, a condition that impairs the movement of bile, the fluid produced by the liver to digest fats. [More]
UTHealth awarded $1.55 million grant to evaluate, validate assessment tools for grieving children

UTHealth awarded $1.55 million grant to evaluate, validate assessment tools for grieving children

The New York Life Foundation has awarded a three-year, $1.55 million grant to The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Trauma and Grief Center for Youth to establish the GIFT (Grief-Informed Foundations of Treatment) network, a multi-site practice-research network that will refine, evaluate and validate assessment tools for grieving children to identify the appropriate support or intervention needed. [More]
University of Colorado Boulder combines Raman spectroscopy and nanoindentation for improved materials characterisation

University of Colorado Boulder combines Raman spectroscopy and nanoindentation for improved materials characterisation

The University of Colorado Boulder, USA, combines Raman spectroscopy and nanoindentation for improved materials characterisation. [More]
Low adiponectin levels may lead to development of PTSD symptoms

Low adiponectin levels may lead to development of PTSD symptoms

Individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) relive past traumas again and again, bound in a virtual prison of their memories. [More]
NYUCD awarded $1.6M grant to explore biological and physiological effects of e-cig use on oral health

NYUCD awarded $1.6M grant to explore biological and physiological effects of e-cig use on oral health

The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, a division of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded NYU College of Dentistry Professors Deepak Saxena, MS, PhD, and Xin Li, PhD, a four-year $1.6M NIDCR grant to study the biological and physiological effects of electronic cigarette aerosol mixtures on oral health. [More]
PHE renews contract for Down's, Edwards' and Patau's syndromes antenatal screening programme

PHE renews contract for Down's, Edwards' and Patau's syndromes antenatal screening programme

Public Health England has renewed its contract with Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry to provide the Down's syndrome screening Quality Assurance Support Service for its Down's, Edwards' and Patau's syndromes antenatal screening programme in England. [More]
Common misconception about penicillin allergies

Common misconception about penicillin allergies

It's time for your primary care check-up, and the doctor asks you to list any known drug allergies. "Penicillin," you say immediately, although you can't remember actually taking the drug or having a reaction to it—it was your parents who said so. According to a Texas A&M Health Science Center allergist, many people who believe they're allergic to this antibiotic may not actually be allergic at all. [More]
Older adults become more sensitive to pain, study shows

Older adults become more sensitive to pain, study shows

When older relatives complain about their pains, show a little empathy, because new research suggests that as we age, we may all become more sensitive to pain. A small, preliminary University of Florida Health study has suggested for the first time that inflammation may occur more quickly and at a higher magnitude -- and stays around longer -- when older adults experience pain versus when younger adults experience pain. [More]
Innovative bone marrow-on-a-chip microdevice holds promise for developing improved radiation countermeasures

Innovative bone marrow-on-a-chip microdevice holds promise for developing improved radiation countermeasures

Engineered bone marrow grown in a novel microfluidic chip device responds to damaging radiation exposure followed by treatment with compounds that aid in blood cell recovery in a way that mimics living bone marrow. [More]
Researchers explore changes in Parkinson's-affected cells at different stages of the disease

Researchers explore changes in Parkinson's-affected cells at different stages of the disease

It's an unsettling thought: You could be walking around for 20 years developing Parkinson's disease and not even know it. [More]
New gene testing method can identify mutations, prioritize variants in breast and ovarian cancer genes

New gene testing method can identify mutations, prioritize variants in breast and ovarian cancer genes

A research team led by an award-winning genomicist at Western University has developed a new method for identifying mutations and prioritizing variants in breast and ovarian cancer genes, which will not only reduce the number of possible variants for doctors to investigate, but also increase the number of patients that are properly diagnosed. [More]
Report highlights parlous state of British children's teeth

Report highlights parlous state of British children's teeth

The Local Government Association has today published a report that states that around 100 children and teenagers a day are being admitted to hospital for surgery to remove rotten teeth. [More]
Study finds how tumour cells grow through scavenging bad cholesterol

Study finds how tumour cells grow through scavenging bad cholesterol

Several studies have recognized a link between obesity and cancer. Richard Lehner, professor of Pediatrics and investigator at the University of Alberta's Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, has taken his research further to understand how tumour cells grow through scavenging very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL) and low-density lipoproteins (LDL), commonly known as the "bad cholesterol", and what mechanisms can be used to reduce the malignant cells' growth. [More]
Phenotypic personalized medicine can identify a person's optimal drug, dose combinations

Phenotypic personalized medicine can identify a person's optimal drug, dose combinations

For decades, doctors and scientists have predicted that personalized medicine — tailoring drug doses and combinations to people's specific diseases and body chemistry — would be the future of health care. [More]
Study finds correlation between male sex hormones and oral health

Study finds correlation between male sex hormones and oral health

More than 20 species of macaques, the most widely distributed nonhuman primates in the world, socialize in lively troops and make frequent appearances on National Geographic documentaries. But, what can we learn from one of our closest primate relatives about our own oral health? [More]
Opioids could be dangerous, deadly at high doses

Opioids could be dangerous, deadly at high doses

Most people know that heroin is a dangerous drug, but its cousins, the legal, pharmaceutical opioids, such as codeine or hydrocodone, must be safe, right?Not so fast.Opioids—which include the illegal drug heroin as well as prescription medications, including hydrocodone (such as Vicodin), oxycodone (such as OxyContin and Percocet), morphine and codeine—can be dangerous, even deadly, at high doses. [More]
Certain types of hormonal contraceptives may increase risk of seizures in women with epilepsy

Certain types of hormonal contraceptives may increase risk of seizures in women with epilepsy

Could certain types of hormonal contraceptives cause an increase in seizures in women with epilepsy? A recent Texas A&M Health Science Center study suggests that ethinyl estradiol, the primary component of oral contraceptives, could be detrimental to the epileptic brain. [More]
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