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Capsazepine shows dramatic tumor shrinkage without damaging surrounding tissues

Capsazepine shows dramatic tumor shrinkage without damaging surrounding tissues

Mouse models of human oral cancer treated with an agent called capsazepine showed dramatic tumor shrinkage without damage to surrounding tissues, researchers from the School of Dentistry and School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio found. [More]
Understanding how some cells in the brain and nervous system turn cancerous

Understanding how some cells in the brain and nervous system turn cancerous

Scientists from the Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research in New York with the help of Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry have completed research which for the first time brings us nearer to understanding how some cells in the brain and nervous system become cancerous. [More]
New research sheds light on genetic basis for heart disease in women

New research sheds light on genetic basis for heart disease in women

When it comes to heart disease, Dr. Ross Feldman says women are often in the dark. Historically, it was thought that heart disease was a men's-only disease, however, data has shown that post-menopausal women are just as likely as men to get heart disease and are less likely to be adequately diagnosed and treated. [More]
Study suggests possible link between immune system and schizophrenia

Study suggests possible link between immune system and schizophrenia

Nancy Buccola, MSN, APRN, PMHCNS-BC, CNE, Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans School of Nursing, contributed samples used in a study reporting new locations of genetic material associated with schizophrenia and also suggesting a possible link between the immune system and schizophrenia. [More]
Early stage AMD can occur much earlier than previously thought

Early stage AMD can occur much earlier than previously thought

It is widely accepted that age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of visual impairment and blindness in industrialized countries. [More]
Study shows correlation between education and nearsightedness

Study shows correlation between education and nearsightedness

Education and behavior have a greater impact on the development of nearsightedness than do genetic factors: With each school year completed, a person becomes more nearsighted. [More]
Three leading universities join forces to find better solutions for patients with craniofacial defects

Three leading universities join forces to find better solutions for patients with craniofacial defects

One in every 2,000 babies is born with a skull that can't grow normally. Various sections of these babies' skulls are fused together at joints called sutures, constricting the developing brain and disrupting vision, sleep, eating and IQ. For these young patients, risky skull-expanding surgeries become an almost annual event. [More]
Research: 60% of unstably housed women experience some form of violence

Research: 60% of unstably housed women experience some form of violence

New research from UC San Francisco found that 60 percent of the city's homeless and unstably housed women who are HIV-infected or at high risk to become infected have endured a recent experience of some form of violence. [More]
New book addresses safe and effective exercises for overweight children

New book addresses safe and effective exercises for overweight children

Safe and Effective Exercise for Overweight Youth by Melinda Sothern, PhD, Director of Behavioral & Community Health Sciences and Professor of Research at the LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans School of Public Health, provides exercise recommendations and guidelines specifically designed for overweight youth. [More]
Majority of oral health patients willing to undergo HIV testing in dental settings, study finds

Majority of oral health patients willing to undergo HIV testing in dental settings, study finds

More than 80 per cent of oral health patients are willing to receive rapid HIV-testing in dental settings, which could help reduce the spread of the HIV according to a groundbreaking study revealed today at a Sydney University HIV Testing Symposium. [More]
Twitter should be better utilized to convey public health messages, say researchers

Twitter should be better utilized to convey public health messages, say researchers

Twitter and other social media should be better utilized to convey public health messages, especially to young adults, according to a new analysis by researchers at UC San Francisco. [More]
"Expressive therapy" intervention helps HIV women, improves social support

"Expressive therapy" intervention helps HIV women, improves social support

New research from UC San Francisco shows that an "expressive therapy" group intervention conducted by The Medea Project helps women living with HIV disclose their health status and improves their social support, self-efficacy and the safety and quality of their relationships. [More]
New chemical compound protects against blindness and diabetes in animals

New chemical compound protects against blindness and diabetes in animals

In a new study led by UC San Francisco scientists, a chemical compound designed to precisely target part of a crucial cellular quality-control network provided significant protection, in rats and mice, against degenerative forms of blindness and diabetes. [More]
New class of anti-arthritic drugs reduce arthritic joint inflammation and periodontitis

New class of anti-arthritic drugs reduce arthritic joint inflammation and periodontitis

Inflammatory diseases can occur simultaneously in distinct sites in the same patient, complicating treatment because a medication effective for one disorder may exacerbate the other. [More]
Adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities experience oral health problems

Adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities experience oral health problems

A retrospective study conducted by researchers at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine and colleagues reports that among adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities, the likelihood of having cavities decreased as the number of years receiving dental care increased. [More]

Study: Poor oral health remains major problem in Navajo Nation

A new study from Colorado School of Public Health shows that despite some modest improvements, poor oral health remains a major problem in the Navajo Nation and among American Indians overall. [More]
Clinicians launches ACEmobile app to support assessment of dementia

Clinicians launches ACEmobile app to support assessment of dementia

A team of clinicians from Plymouth, UK, and Sydney, Australia, have today (Wednesday 9th July 2014 UK, Thursday 10th July Australia) launched ACEmobile - a free-to-use app to support the assessment of dementia, worldwide. [More]
Dental pulp stem cells can protect retinal ganglion cells from death following injury

Dental pulp stem cells can protect retinal ganglion cells from death following injury

Researchers at the University of Birmingham, UK, led by Dr. Ben Scheven, Dr. Wendy Leadbeater and Ben Mead have discovered that stem cells isolated from the teeth, termed dental pulp stem cells (DPSC), can protect retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) from death following injury and promote regeneration of their axons along the optic nerve. [More]
Researchers discover new way by which metabolism is linked to regulation of DNA

Researchers discover new way by which metabolism is linked to regulation of DNA

A research team at the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry at the University of Alberta have discovered a new way by which metabolism is linked to the regulation of DNA, the basis of our genetic code. The findings may have important implications for the understanding of many common diseases, including cancer. [More]
Use of catheter ablation lowers risk for atrial fibrillation

Use of catheter ablation lowers risk for atrial fibrillation

Use of catheter ablation is not only beneficial for treating atrial flutter but also can significantly reduce hospital visits - both inpatient and emergency - and lower the risk for atrial fibrillation, according to research by UC San Francisco. [More]