Dentistry News and Research RSS Feed - Dentistry News and Research

Sleep paralysis can be strange and frightening experience but not harmful

Sleep paralysis can be strange and frightening experience but not harmful

Your eyes begin to open after a good night of sleep, but something feels weird. You try to rub the tiredness out of your face but can't lift your arms. In a panic you try to take a deep breath but can't draw air. [More]
Rare pattern of gut microbes in newborns linked to higher risk of later allergies and asthma

Rare pattern of gut microbes in newborns linked to higher risk of later allergies and asthma

The microbes living in a baby's gut during its first month of life may directly impact the developing immune system, leading to a higher risk of allergies and asthma later in childhood, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco and the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit. [More]
Groundbreaking research unravels structure of infectious prions that cause mad cow disease

Groundbreaking research unravels structure of infectious prions that cause mad cow disease

Groundbreaking research from the University of Alberta has identified the structure of the infectious prion protein, the cause of "mad cow disease" or BSE, chronic wasting disease in deer and elk and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, which has long remained a mystery. [More]
Researchers discover risk factors that contribute to fracture nonunion in adults

Researchers discover risk factors that contribute to fracture nonunion in adults

Dr. Robert Zura, the Robert D'Ambrosia Professor and Head of Orthopaedic Surgery at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, was part of a research team that identified risk factors which may help orthopaedic surgeons better predict a serious complication of bone fractures. [More]
Blade implants in oral surgery still successful after 50 years

Blade implants in oral surgery still successful after 50 years

Journal of Oral Implantology – For nearly 50 years, the unique design of the blade implant and the ease of inserting it into a patient’s mouth have made it popular among oral surgeons. As the implant’s golden jubilee approaches, some of its original designers take a new look at a creation that has “passed the test of time.” [More]
Scientists report new neurological complication from Zika virus infection

Scientists report new neurological complication from Zika virus infection

Dr. John England, Professor and Chair of Neurology at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, and colleagues in Honduras and Venezuela have reported a new neurological complication of infection with the Zika virus. [More]
Oventus reports early revenues, establishes platform for accelerated growth

Oventus reports early revenues, establishes platform for accelerated growth

Medical device sleep apnoea and snoring disorder company Oventus Medical Ltd. releases its first 4E. The company has established a platform for accelerated growth following a successful IPO raising $12 million and is reporting encouraging early revenue. [More]
UCSF researchers identify new strategy to cultivate beneficial energy-burning fat

UCSF researchers identify new strategy to cultivate beneficial energy-burning fat

UC San Francisco researchers studying beige fat — a calorie-burning tissue that can help to ward off obesity and diabetes — have discovered a new strategy to cultivate this beneficial blubber. [More]
Atomic level analysis reveals how two classes of calcium channel blockers produce different effects

Atomic level analysis reveals how two classes of calcium channel blockers produce different effects

An atomic level analysis has revealed how two classes of calcium channel blockers, widely prescribed for heart disease patients, produce separate therapeutic effects through their actions at different sites on the calcium channel molecule. [More]
People with psychosis engage in low levels of physical activity, study reveals

People with psychosis engage in low levels of physical activity, study reveals

A large international study of more than 200,000 people in nearly 50 countries has revealed that people with psychosis engage in low levels of physical activity, and men with psychosis are over two times more likely to miss global activity targets compared to people without the illness. [More]
Researchers to investigate how physical activity could help individuals with alcohol, substance use disorders

Researchers to investigate how physical activity could help individuals with alcohol, substance use disorders

Once the research team has findings, it will share them with health and social service providers, funders, service users and others to gain their views on what the best methods are and to whom they should be offered. [More]
Testing lesions in food pipe could provide early and accurate diagnosis of oesophageal cancer

Testing lesions in food pipe could provide early and accurate diagnosis of oesophageal cancer

Genetically analysing lesions in the food pipe could provide an early and accurate test for oesophageal cancer, according to research led by Queen Mary University of London, Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam and Arizona State University. [More]
Experts suggest leaky gut syndrome could be cause for stomach problems among Olympic competitors

Experts suggest leaky gut syndrome could be cause for stomach problems among Olympic competitors

A number of competitors at the Rio Olympics have reported stomach problems. Team GB officials have denied that athletes have fallen victim to food poisoning at the Olympic athletes' village in Rio, despite a number complaining of upset stomachs. [More]
Poor prenatal nutrition may be linked to ADHD symptoms and conduct problems in children

Poor prenatal nutrition may be linked to ADHD symptoms and conduct problems in children

New research led by scientists from King's College London and the University of Bristol has found that a high-fat, high-sugar diet during pregnancy may be linked to symptoms of ADHD in children who show conduct problems early in life. [More]
Research shines more light on role of proteins in maintaining synaptic transmission

Research shines more light on role of proteins in maintaining synaptic transmission

Synapses are the power junctions that allow living creatures to function. Popularly associated with learning and memory, they play a more fundamental role in our existence by regulating everything from breathing, sleeping and waking and other bodily functions. [More]
Tips to help older adults maintain lifelong oral health

Tips to help older adults maintain lifelong oral health

Seventy million people in this country - 20 percent of the US population -- will be 65 or older by 2030. If you're one of them, you probably think often about how to stay as fit and healthy as possible. But, you may not be giving as much thought to the health of your teeth. [More]
Video selfies of tooth-brushing can help improve oral health care techniques, study shows

Video selfies of tooth-brushing can help improve oral health care techniques, study shows

Recording smart phone video "selfies" of tooth-brushing can help people learn to improve their oral health care techniques, according to a new study. [More]
TTUHSC El Paso receives USDA grant to offer long-distance health education to rural communities

TTUHSC El Paso receives USDA grant to offer long-distance health education to rural communities

The Gayle Greve Hunt School of Nursing at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso has received a $430,780 grant from the United States Department of Agriculture to provide long-distance health education to underserved communities in rural West Texas. [More]
Watching cartoons during dental treatment could help reduce anxiety and distress in children

Watching cartoons during dental treatment could help reduce anxiety and distress in children

Watching cartoons through video glasses during dental treatment could help lessen children's anxiety and distress as well as reducing disruptive behaviour, according to a randomized controlled trial published in Acta Odontologia Scandinavica. [More]
New research provides insight into how exercise helps retain old memories

New research provides insight into how exercise helps retain old memories

Research has found that exercise causes more new neurons to be formed in a critical brain region, and contrary to an earlier study, these new neurons do not cause the individual to forget old memories, according to research by Texas A&M College of Medicine scientists, in the Journal of Neuroscience. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement