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Study estimates prevalence of periodontitis at state and local levels across U.S. using SAE method

Study estimates prevalence of periodontitis at state and local levels across U.S. using SAE method

The International and American Associations for Dental Research have published an article titled "Predicting Periodontitis at State and Local Levels in the United States" in the OnlineFirst portion of the Journal of Dental Research. In it, authors P.I. Eke, X. Zhang, H. Lu, L. Wei, G. Thornton-Evans, K.J. Greenlund, J.B. Holt and J.B. Croft estimate the prevalence of periodontitis at state and local levels across the United States by using a novel, small area estimation (SAE) method. [More]
Lamin nucleoskeleton disordered in Alzheimer's

Lamin nucleoskeleton disordered in Alzheimer's

Brain cell death in Alzheimer's disease is linked to disruption of a skeleton that surrounds the nucleus of the cells, a researcher in the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio said. [More]
Parents need to take active role in oral health of children

Parents need to take active role in oral health of children

February is National Children's Dental Health Month, an opportunity for parents of toddlers, young children or teenagers to explore questions about keeping your child's teeth clean, your child's first dental visit or how to protect children's smiles. [More]
Men with ASD have differences in brain connections

Men with ASD have differences in brain connections

Research at King's College London has revealed subtle brain differences in adult males with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), which may go some way towards explaining why symptoms persist into adulthood in some people with the disorder. [More]
UCLA researchers find protein combination that could improve clinical bone restoration

UCLA researchers find protein combination that could improve clinical bone restoration

A UCLA research team has found a combination of proteins that could significantly improve clinical bone restoration. The findings may be a big step toward developing effective therapeutic treatments for bone skeletal defects, bone loss and osteoporosis. [More]
New NYUCD study explores how gene expression initiated in notochord

New NYUCD study explores how gene expression initiated in notochord

A new study by basic science researchers in the Department of Basic Science and Craniofacial Biology at New York University College of Dentistry sought to understand how gene expression is initiated in the notochord, the evolutionary and developmental precursor of the backbone. [More]
Study shows regular caffeine consumption does not lead to extra heartbeats

Study shows regular caffeine consumption does not lead to extra heartbeats

Contrary to current clinical belief, regular caffeine consumption does not lead to extra heartbeats, which, while common, can lead in rare cases to heart- or stroke-related morbidity and mortality, according to UC San Francisco researchers. [More]
Children with sensory processing disorder have altered pathways for brain connectivity

Children with sensory processing disorder have altered pathways for brain connectivity

Researchers at UC San Francisco have found that boys and girls with sensory processing disorder (SPD) have altered pathways for brain connectivity when compared to typically developing children, and the difference predicts challenges with auditory and tactile processing. [More]
New interprofessional program aims to provide primary care and dental services to older adults

New interprofessional program aims to provide primary care and dental services to older adults

Primary care within a dental practice? It's an interdisciplinary idea that has teeth: Your mouth, noted the U.S. surgeon general in the Oral Health in America report, provides a window into your overall health. Now, a research team led by Maria Dolce, an associate professor in the School of Nursing at Northeastern, will make that idea a reality. [More]
UCSF-led study shows increase in use of CT scans in patients with non-serious injuries

UCSF-led study shows increase in use of CT scans in patients with non-serious injuries

Twice as many patients with non-serious injuries, such as fractures or neck strain, are undergoing CT scans in emergency departments at California hospitals, according to a UCSF-led study, which tracked the use of the imaging from 2005 to 2013. [More]
Researchers identify protein that could protect against toxic degeneration of cells in ALS

Researchers identify protein that could protect against toxic degeneration of cells in ALS

J. Gavin Daigle, a PhD candidate at the LSU Health New Orleans School of Graduate Studies, is the first author of a paper whose findings reveal another piece of the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) puzzle. [More]
Needle-free administration of anesthetic in the mouth could save costs, improve patient compliance

Needle-free administration of anesthetic in the mouth could save costs, improve patient compliance

If you're scared of the dentist's needles you're not alone - but new research means you might not have to put off that appointment again. A study published in Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces reveals how the dentist could give you anesthetic using a tiny electric current instead of a needle. [More]
Adult smokers who use e-cigarettes 28% less likely to quit smoking

Adult smokers who use e-cigarettes 28% less likely to quit smoking

Electronic cigarettes are widely promoted and used to help smokers quit traditional cigarettes, but a new analysis from UC San Francisco found that adult smokers who use e-cigarettes are actually 28 percent less likely to stop smoking cigarettes. [More]
Food preservative delivers one-two punch to cancer, antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Food preservative delivers one-two punch to cancer, antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Nisin, a naturally occurring food preservative that grows on dairy products, delivers a one-two punch to two of medicine's most lethal maladies: cancer and deadly, antibiotic-resistant bacteria. [More]
Cholesterol-lowering drug simvastatin could become effective treatment for Parkinson's

Cholesterol-lowering drug simvastatin could become effective treatment for Parkinson's

A clinical trial using cholesterol-lowering treatment Simvastatin in people living with Parkinson's is getting underway in centres across the country -- with the hope that it could become one of a number of effective treatments available to treat Parkinson's. [More]
Strathspey Crown Holdings announces acquisition of Novus Via assets

Strathspey Crown Holdings announces acquisition of Novus Via assets

Strathspey Crown Holdings LLC announced today the acquisition of the portfolio companies of Novus Via LP, a Nevada-based venture capital investment firm focused on end-stage development and commercialization of advanced electromagnetic and electrochemical technologies spanning healthcare, clean energy and coherent acoustics. The terms of the transaction were not disclosed. [More]
DNA-binding protein acts like genetic traffic signal to orchestrate early stage embryonic development

DNA-binding protein acts like genetic traffic signal to orchestrate early stage embryonic development

New research by UC San Francisco stem cell biologists has revealed that a DNA-binding protein called Foxd3 acts like a genetic traffic signal, holding that ball of undifferentiated cells in a state of readiness for its great transformation in the third week of development. [More]
Combining NELL-1 with BMP2 therapy may promote bone development

Combining NELL-1 with BMP2 therapy may promote bone development

Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) is used clinically to promote bone repair. However, the high BMP2 concentrations required to stimulate bone growth in humans may produce life-threatening adverse effects such as cervical swelling in spinal fusion procedures, a problem that prompted an FDA warning in 2008. [More]
Purified cannabinoid reduces seizures in children and young adults with treatment-resistant epilepsy

Purified cannabinoid reduces seizures in children and young adults with treatment-resistant epilepsy

Children and young adults with severe forms of epilepsy that does not respond to standard antiepileptic drugs have fewer seizures when treated with purified cannabinoid, according to a multi-center study led by researchers from UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital San Francisco. [More]
Antibiotic prophylaxis may be recommended for dental patients

Antibiotic prophylaxis may be recommended for dental patients

When the majority of patients go in for their dental visits there is not much of a risk for bacterial infection. But for a small number of people, the use of antibiotic prophylaxis may be recommended by your dentist. [More]
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