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Highlights from the August issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter

Highlights from the August issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter

Here are highlights from the August issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter. You may cite this publication as often as you wish. Reprinting is allowed for a fee. Mayo Clinic Health Letter attribution is required. [More]
Blockbuster Fifty Shades linked with greater risk of harmful health behaviors in women

Blockbuster Fifty Shades linked with greater risk of harmful health behaviors in women

Popular fiction that normalizes and glamorizes violence against women, such as the blockbuster Fifty Shades series, may be associated with a greater risk of potentially harmful health behaviors and risks. [More]
TOS publishes unprecedented level of obesity research

TOS publishes unprecedented level of obesity research

The Obesity Society (TOS) took the next step to advance the treatment of obesity by publishing an unprecedented level of obesity research, in print and online, as a supplement to its July and August issues of the Obesity journal: Guidelines (2013) for Managing Overweight and Obesity in Adults: Full Report. Now, the print version of the supplement is available for purchase as a reference guide for obesity treatment. [More]
Majority of states not measuring up on legislative solutions that fight cancer, shows report

Majority of states not measuring up on legislative solutions that fight cancer, shows report

A majority of states are not measuring up on legislative solutions that prevent and fight cancer, according to a new report released today by the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN). [More]
Insulin can protect cells of pancreas from acute pancreatitis

Insulin can protect cells of pancreas from acute pancreatitis

Scientists from The University of Manchester have discovered that insulin can protect the cells of the pancreas from acute pancreatitis - a disease for which there is currently no treatment. [More]
Dietary compliance can be evaluated from blood sample

Dietary compliance can be evaluated from blood sample

New results from the Nordic SYSDIET study show that it's possible to assess dietary compliance from a blood sample. This is especially useful in controlled dietary intervention studies investigating the health benefits of specific diets. [More]
Five tips to make children go back to school

Five tips to make children go back to school

It's that time of year again: parents are winding down summer plans and tightening the reins on bedtime schedules. And while adding anything else to the back-to-school to-do list may seem daunting, Children's Memorial Hermann Hospital has five tips that will make going back to school this year easier than ever. [More]
Using a nanotech microchip to diagnose type 1 diabetes: an interview with Dr. Brian Feldman, Stanford School of Medicine

Using a nanotech microchip to diagnose type 1 diabetes: an interview with Dr. Brian Feldman, Stanford School of Medicine

The most common form of diabetes is sometimes referred to as metabolic diabetes, which is the diabetes most people are very familiar with, type 2 diabetes. This form of diabetes is most prevalent in people that are overweight or obese. Historically, it has been confined to adults or older patients but it has been on the rise as the global obesity problem has continued to worsen. [More]
Brookdale offers tips to seniors to keep themselves safe and independent

Brookdale offers tips to seniors to keep themselves safe and independent

Brookdale understands the importance for seniors to maintain and maximize their independence as they age. There comes a time when seniors look to others, including their adult children, for guidance and support, and Brookdale is here to help find solutions to the needs in their lives. [More]
Research findings call for clinical testing of relevant drugs to prevent NASH

Research findings call for clinical testing of relevant drugs to prevent NASH

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common affliction, affecting almost 30 percent of Americans, with a significant number suffering from its most severe form, called non-alcoholic steatohepatitis or NASH, which can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer. In recent years, NASH has become the leading cause of liver transplantation. [More]
Researchers delve into bone and tooth chemistry of King Richard III

Researchers delve into bone and tooth chemistry of King Richard III

A recent study by the British Geological Survey, in association with researchers at the University of Leicester, has delved into the bone and tooth chemistry of King Richard III and uncovered fascinating new details about the life and diet of Britain's last Plantagenet king. [More]
Human milk diet protects intestines and supports growth of premature infants

Human milk diet protects intestines and supports growth of premature infants

For premature infants, adequate growth while in the neonatal intensive care unit is an indicator of better long-term health and developmental outcomes. [More]
Microbes influence human eating behavior, dietary choices

Microbes influence human eating behavior, dietary choices

It sounds like science fiction, but it seems that bacteria within us — which outnumber our own cells about 100-fold — may very well be affecting both our cravings and moods to get us to eat what they want, and often are driving us toward obesity. [More]
Nutrition counseling by registered dietitian nutritionist can help prevent or delay diabetes

Nutrition counseling by registered dietitian nutritionist can help prevent or delay diabetes

A new study, indicating that Americans have approximately a 40 percent risk of developing diabetes during their lifetime, offers more evidence that nutrition counseling provided by a registered dietitian nutritionist can help prevent or delay diabetes and its related health problems through lifestyle and dietary changes, according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. [More]
Diet reduces inflammatory markers in ‘real world’ Type 2 diabetes

Diet reduces inflammatory markers in ‘real world’ Type 2 diabetes

Encouraging patients newly diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes to diet or to diet and increase their physical activity reduces markers of inflammation and their cardiovascular risk compared with usual care, real-world study findings show. [More]
HDAC inhibitors may also be effective against kidney stones

HDAC inhibitors may also be effective against kidney stones

Anyone who has suffered from kidney stones is keenly aware of the lack of drugs to treat the condition, which often causes excruciating pain. [More]
Food allergies more common in young inner-city children

Food allergies more common in young inner-city children

Already known for their higher-than-usual risk of asthma and environmental allergies, young inner-city children appear to suffer disproportionately from food allergies as well, according to results of a study led by scientists at the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center. [More]
Low intake of dietary salt could be dangerous

Low intake of dietary salt could be dangerous

Findings from a large, four-year study suggest that an inadequate amount of salt in the diet could increase the risk of poor cardiovascular outcomes and death. [More]
Researchers show effects of increased and decreased sodium intake on blood pressure

Researchers show effects of increased and decreased sodium intake on blood pressure

Two reports from a global collaborative study involving hundreds of investigators from 18 countries published today in the New England Journal of Medicine are shaking up conventional wisdom around salt consumption. [More]
Viewpoints: Robin Williams' 'wakeup call'; surprise in Medicaid growth; tools to stop Ebola in U.S.

Viewpoints: Robin Williams' 'wakeup call'; surprise in Medicaid growth; tools to stop Ebola in U.S.

Earlier this year, [Robin] Williams checked himself into a rehabilitation facility. And whether he needed help with addiction or mental illness-;or, as is so often the case, with both-;it's safe to assume he got it. He had the money to afford the best and the sad truth is that, in some cases, even the best isn't enough to save people. [More]