Diet News and Research RSS Feed - Diet News and Research Twitter

European cardiovascular prevention guidelines emphasise population approaches

European cardiovascular prevention guidelines emphasise population approaches

The European Society of Cardiology has updated its cardiovascular disease prevention guidelines to include, for the first time, population approaches to be implemented by legislators, schools and workplaces. [More]
NASA releases new video that highlights Mark and Scott Kelly's metabolites

NASA releases new video that highlights Mark and Scott Kelly's metabolites

NASA's Human Research Program is releasing "Metabolomics: You Are What You Eat" video to highlight its Twins Study which uses omics to study Mark and Scott Kelly's metabolites. [More]
NR supplements can reduce diabetes-related complications in mice

NR supplements can reduce diabetes-related complications in mice

A naturally occurring vitamin, nicotinamide riboside (NR), can lower blood sugar levels, reduce fatty liver, and prevent peripheral nerve damage in mouse models of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes (T2D), according to a new study by researchers at the University of Iowa and the Iowa City VA Health Care System. [More]
Small drug-like molecule that alters perception of food may hold key to extending human healthspan

Small drug-like molecule that alters perception of food may hold key to extending human healthspan

Researchers at the Buck Institute have shown a new effect on aging via a small drug-like molecule that alters the perception of food in the nematode C. elegans. Publishing in Aging Cell, researchers "tricked" the worm's metabolism into a state of caloric restriction, extending the animal's lifespan by 50 percent. [More]
Study shows birth defects in immune system function may contribute to malnutrition

Study shows birth defects in immune system function may contribute to malnutrition

Malnourished children are most likely to die from common infections, not starvation alone, and immune disorder may be part of the cause, according to a review led by Queen Mary University of London. [More]
Fasting-mimicking diet may help decrease multiple sclerosis symptoms

Fasting-mimicking diet may help decrease multiple sclerosis symptoms

Evidence is mounting that a diet mimicking the effects of fasting has health benefits beyond weight loss, with a new USC-led study indicating that it may reduce symptoms of multiple sclerosis. [More]
Accumulation of gut bacterial metabolite may lead to serious health problems in CKD patients

Accumulation of gut bacterial metabolite may lead to serious health problems in CKD patients

In patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), the accumulation of a gut bacterial metabolite that's normally excreted in urine may contribute to serious health problems. The findings come from a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. [More]
Prepackaged food may contribute to more weight loss than self-selected diet

Prepackaged food may contribute to more weight loss than self-selected diet

Increased portion sizes in Americans' diets is widely recognized as a contributor to the obesity epidemic, and now new research published in Obesity, the scientific journal of The Obesity Society, examines the effect of prepackaged, portion-controlled meals on weight loss. [More]
Prenatal fruit consumption linked to improved cognitive development in infants

Prenatal fruit consumption linked to improved cognitive development in infants

Most people have heard the old adage "an apple a day keeps the doctor away." It's an old truth that encompasses more than just apples--eating fruit in general is well known to reduce risk for a wide variety of health conditions such as heart disease and stroke. [More]
Clinical study supports safety, efficacy of GI Windows’ IAS as treatment option for Type 2 diabetes

Clinical study supports safety, efficacy of GI Windows’ IAS as treatment option for Type 2 diabetes

GI Windows, Inc., a clinical-stage medical device company, today announced the presentation of six-month results of the first-ever clinical study evaluating the endoscopic creation of a dual-path enteral diversion using the company’s Incision-less Anastomosis System (IAS) at Digestive Disease Week® 2016 (DDW), in San Diego, Calif. [More]
Nutrition, safety tips for grilling season

Nutrition, safety tips for grilling season

Cooking meat, including beef, pork, fish, or poultry, with high-temperature methods such as pan frying or grilling directly over an open flame can increase exposure to chemicals that can cause changes in DNA that may increase the risk of cancer, according to the National Cancer Institute. [More]
Obese individuals who consume aspartame may have worse glucose management

Obese individuals who consume aspartame may have worse glucose management

Artificial sweeteners help individuals with obesity to cut calories and lose weight but may have negative health effects, according to researchers at York University's Faculty of Health. [More]
Diet-based therapy may improve quality of life in IBS patients

Diet-based therapy may improve quality of life in IBS patients

A change in diet can improve the lives of those diagnosed with a common, but hard-to-treat gut disorder. [More]
Existing MCI screening tools result in more than 7% false-negative error rate, study finds

Existing MCI screening tools result in more than 7% false-negative error rate, study finds

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a slight but noticeable and measurable decline in cognitive abilities, such as remembering names or a list of items. While changes may not be severe enough to disrupt daily life, a clinical diagnosis of MCI indicates an increased risk of eventually developing Alzheimer's disease or another type of dementia. [More]
Telephone-based intervention helps reduce menopause-related insomnia, hot flashes

Telephone-based intervention helps reduce menopause-related insomnia, hot flashes

Chatting on the phone with a "sleep coach" and keeping a nightly sleep diary significantly improve sleep quality and reduce insomnia in women through all stages of menopause, according to a new study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]
Food-triggered atopic dermatitis in children may lead to life-threatening anaphylaxis risk

Food-triggered atopic dermatitis in children may lead to life-threatening anaphylaxis risk

Elimination of the food that triggers atopic dermatitis, or eczema, is associated with increased risk of developing immediate reactions to that food, according to the results of a large-scale study recently published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. [More]
School obesity prevention program helps seventh graders lose weight over long-term period

School obesity prevention program helps seventh graders lose weight over long-term period

A five-week obesity prevention program for seventh grade students in Southern California helped obese students lose weight over a long-term period, according to a new study from the RAND Corporation, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School and the Los Angeles Unified School District. [More]
Study links low- and high-birthweight babies to increased cardiovascular disease risk

Study links low- and high-birthweight babies to increased cardiovascular disease risk

For reasons that remain unclear at least in the smaller babies, both birthweight extremes appear to increase the likelihood of early development of dangerous fat around major organs in the abdomen that significantly increases these risks, said Dr. Brian Stansfield, neonatologist at the Children's Hospital of Georgia and the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University. [More]
Epigenetic modification of Igfbp2 gene may increase risk of obesity and fatty liver

Epigenetic modification of Igfbp2 gene may increase risk of obesity and fatty liver

Scientists of the German Center for Diabetes Research led by the German Institute of Human Nutrition have shown in a mouse model that the epigenetic modification of the Igfbp2 gene observed in the young animal precedes a fatty liver in the adult animal later in life. [More]
Researchers explore link between social media, eating disorders, and compulsive exercise

Researchers explore link between social media, eating disorders, and compulsive exercise

In a new open access article for Cogent Social Sciences; Mobile Exercising and Tweeting the Pounds Away: The Use of Digital Applications and Microblogging and their Association with Disordered Eating and Compulsive Exercise, researchers from Georgia College & State University, and Chapman University explore the relationship between social media, eating disorders, and compulsive exercise. [More]
Advertisement