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Filipino women who move to Canada face breast cancer risk at younger age

Filipino women who move to Canada face breast cancer risk at younger age

Filipinos who move to Canada are diagnosed with breast cancer at a younger age than women from other parts of East Asia or Caucasians, new research has found. [More]
Patients with symptoms of mental illness less likely to receive advice from health care providers

Patients with symptoms of mental illness less likely to receive advice from health care providers

More than half of patients with symptoms of mental illness - and nearly one-third of those who also had diabetes - said their health care providers had never told them to exercise or reduce their intake of dietary fat, according to a new study published in Diabetes Educator. [More]
Diets high in animal proteins can worsen progression of kidney disease

Diets high in animal proteins can worsen progression of kidney disease

An estimated 26 million people in the United States have chronic kidney disease, which can lead to complete kidney failure. Once the kidneys fail, patients either need to undergo dialysis treatments three times a week or have a kidney transplant to remain alive. [More]
Peanut consumption in infancy prevents allergy in kids who are at high-risk for developing peanut allergy

Peanut consumption in infancy prevents allergy in kids who are at high-risk for developing peanut allergy

A new study reported today in the New England Journal of Medicine demonstrates that consumption of a peanut-containing snack by infants who are at high-risk for developing peanut allergy prevents the subsequent development of allergy. [More]
Diabetes, depression linked to higher risk of dementia in people with mild cognitive impairment

Diabetes, depression linked to higher risk of dementia in people with mild cognitive impairment

People with mild cognitive impairment are at higher risk of developing dementia if they have diabetes or psychiatric symptoms such as depression, finds a new review led by UCL researchers. [More]
Beneficial effects of statin treatment exaggerated, say researchers

Beneficial effects of statin treatment exaggerated, say researchers

Hailed as miracle drugs when they hit the market two decades ago, statins, the cholesterol-lowering drugs prescribed to prevent heart attacks, are not as effective nor as safe as we have been led to believe, say Dr. David M. Diamond, a professor of psychology, molecular pharmacology and physiology at the University of South Florida, and Dr. Uffe Ravnskov, an independent health researcher and an expert in cholesterol and cardiovascular disease. [More]
Researchers develop targeted approach that allows muscle to burn more energy

Researchers develop targeted approach that allows muscle to burn more energy

What started as an evolutionary protection against starvation has become a biological "bad joke" for people who need to lose weight. The human body doesn't distinguish between dieting and possible starvation, so when there is a decrease in calories consumed, human metabolism increases its energy efficiency and weight loss is resisted. [More]
Women with multiple sclerosis may have lower levels of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory nutrients

Women with multiple sclerosis may have lower levels of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory nutrients

Women with multiple sclerosis (MS) may have lower levels of important antioxidant and anti-inflammatory nutrients, such as folate from food and vitamin E, than healthy people, according to a new study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 67th Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, April 18 to 25, 2015. [More]
Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine professor explores causes, treatments of anorexia

Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine professor explores causes, treatments of anorexia

Eating disorders are serious, debilitating conditions associated with significant morbidity and mortality, and distress. Anorexia nervosa, in particular, is associated with the highest mortality and suicide rates; compared to healthy peers, women with anorexia are up to 12 times more likely to die of any cause, and approximately 57 times more likely to die from suicide, over the same period of time. [More]
Unhealthy foods outpace beneficial dietary changes in middle-income nations

Unhealthy foods outpace beneficial dietary changes in middle-income nations

In a first-of-its-kind analysis of worldwide dietary patterns, a team including researchers from the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University and the Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge found overall diet quality worsened across the world even as consumption of healthier foods increased in many countries. [More]
New research finds that synthetic flame retardants can cause metabolic and liver problems

New research finds that synthetic flame retardants can cause metabolic and liver problems

Chemicals used as synthetic flame retardants that are found in common household items such as couches, carpet padding, and electronics have been found to cause metabolic and liver problems that can lead to insulin resistance, which is a major cause of obesity, according to new research from the University of New Hampshire. [More]
Sleep loss can lead to diabetes, reveals new research

Sleep loss can lead to diabetes, reveals new research

Lack of sleep can elevate levels of free fatty acids in the blood, accompanied by temporary pre-diabetic conditions in healthy young men, according to new research published online February 19, 2015, in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes. [More]
Researchers assemble comprehensive map of human epigenome

Researchers assemble comprehensive map of human epigenome

Virtually every cell in the body carries an identical genome. But how is it possible that each of the body's 200 different types of specialized cells - in the heart, brain, bone, skin and elsewhere - develops from the same DNA instruction book? [More]
Soft drink consumers exposed to unnecessary cancer risk

Soft drink consumers exposed to unnecessary cancer risk

Public health researchers have analyzed soda consumption data in order to characterize people's exposure to a potentially carcinogenic byproduct of some types of caramel color. Caramel color is a common ingredient in colas and other dark soft drinks. The results show that between 44 and 58 percent of people over the age of six typically have at least one can of soda per day, possibly more, potentially exposing them to 4-methylimidazole (4-MEI), a possible human carcinogen formed during the manufacture of some kinds of caramel color. [More]
Lupus Research Institute announces this year's Novel Research Grants

Lupus Research Institute announces this year's Novel Research Grants

As the Lupus Research Institute celebrates its 15th anniversary, the engine of innovation moves forward at accelerated speed with the announcement of this year's Novel Research Grants bringing new talent from a wide diversity of specialties. Each project lives up to the strictest definition of novel – wholly original, never-been-done-before. [More]
First comprehensive maps and analyses of human epigenomes revealed

First comprehensive maps and analyses of human epigenomes revealed

Two dozen scientific papers published online simultaneously on Feb. 18, 2015 present the first comprehensive maps and analyses of the epigenomes of a wide array of human cell and tissue types. Epigenomes are patterns of chemical annotations to the genome that determine whether, how, and when genes are activated. [More]
CTCA presents research on new cancer nutrition therapies at A.S.P.E.N. Clinical Nutrition Week

CTCA presents research on new cancer nutrition therapies at A.S.P.E.N. Clinical Nutrition Week

Several Cancer Treatment Centers of America clinicians presented research from studies evaluating new cancer nutrition techniques and therapies at the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Clinical Nutrition Week held in Long Beach, Calif., February 14-17, 2015. CTCA clinicians led a plenary session and an oral abstract presentation, and presented eight posters to Clinical Nutrition Week attendees. [More]
SLU researchers halt fatty liver disease in animal model

SLU researchers halt fatty liver disease in animal model

Doctors believe that up to 30 percent of the U.S. population may have fat accumulation in the liver, known as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), that can lead to a range of damaging health consequences. [More]
High-fat diet may reduce heart attack damage by 50%

High-fat diet may reduce heart attack damage by 50%

It's well known that over the long run, a high-fat diet increases the risk of heart attack and stroke. [More]
Researchers say that cancer experience can lead to healthy lifestyle in survivors and family members

Researchers say that cancer experience can lead to healthy lifestyle in survivors and family members

After studying cancer survivors and their family caregivers, researchers at Case Western Reserve University conclude that the period between the final cancer treatment and first post-treatment checkup may be an ideal time for the entire household to jumpstart a healthy lifestyle. [More]