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Study sheds light on role of red raspberries in metabolically-based chronic diseases

Study sheds light on role of red raspberries in metabolically-based chronic diseases

Components in red raspberries may have anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and metabolic stabilizing activity, according to a comprehensive review of the available scientific literature published in the January issue of Advances in Nutrition. [More]
Diet containing unsaturated fats positively impacts weight loss and heart health markers

Diet containing unsaturated fats positively impacts weight loss and heart health markers

A new study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association found that a diet containing unsaturated fats, such as those found in walnuts and olive oil, has similar weight loss effects as a lower fat, higher-carbohydrate diet. [More]
Simple change in diet could boost vitamin D levels for people suffering from Type 2 diabetes

Simple change in diet could boost vitamin D levels for people suffering from Type 2 diabetes

A simple change in diet could boost vitamin D levels for millions of Americans suffering from Type 2 diabetes, according to new research from Iowa State University published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. [More]
Older people could be at greater risk for negative consequences of consuming high-salt diet

Older people could be at greater risk for negative consequences of consuming high-salt diet

Aging is associated with a number of changes that cause the body to function less efficiently, including the way the body controls water and sodium levels. Research has shown that as humans and animals age, they are less able to regulate sodium and water retention, urine concentration and thirst compared to their younger counterparts. [More]
Simple strategies may help people stave off neurodegenerative condition

Simple strategies may help people stave off neurodegenerative condition

Diet, exercise, a good night's sleep -- all sound recommendations for mitigating one's risk for everything from heart disease to diabetes and, as it turns out, Alzheimer's. [More]
UC San Diego School of Medicine launches new NAFLD Research Center

UC San Diego School of Medicine launches new NAFLD Research Center

Roughly one-quarter of all Americans - an estimated 100 million adults and children - have nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a chronic condition that can lead to cirrhosis, liver cancer and liver failure. [More]
Experimental nanoparticle therapy shows promise for fighting primary liver cancer

Experimental nanoparticle therapy shows promise for fighting primary liver cancer

An experimental nanoparticle therapy that combines low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and fish oil preferentially kills primary liver cancer cells without harming healthy cells, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers report. [More]
Study provides new insight into complex interchange that can raise blood levels of fat in type 1 diabetes

Study provides new insight into complex interchange that can raise blood levels of fat in type 1 diabetes

Researchers have new insight into the complex interchange that can raise blood levels of unhealthy lipids, or fat, in type 1 diabetes, and early evidence that a drug under study to block cancer cell growth can restore healthier levels. [More]
Fortified dairy products increase serum vitamin D level in primary school children

Fortified dairy products increase serum vitamin D level in primary school children

Sufficient intake of fortified dairy products is of significant importance for the serum vitamin D level in primary school children, shows a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. Children who drink at least three glasses of milk per day had a higher serum vitamin D level than their peers who drink milk in lesser amounts. [More]
Using BMI to measure health incorrectly labels over 54 million Americans as 'unhealthy', study finds

Using BMI to measure health incorrectly labels over 54 million Americans as 'unhealthy', study finds

Over the past few years, body mass index, a ratio of a person's height and weight, has effectively become a proxy for whether a person is considered healthy. Many U.S. companies use their employees' BMIs as a factor in determining workers' health care costs. And people with higher BMIs could soon have to pay higher health insurance premiums, if a rule proposed in April by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is adopted. [More]
One million serious medical complications could be avoided with improvements in blood glucose levels in diabetics

One million serious medical complications could be avoided with improvements in blood glucose levels in diabetics

Sanofi, Diabetes UK and JDRF today announce the publication of IMPACT 2 in the journal Diabetic Medicine. This new study shows that, if sustained, even modest improvement in blood glucose levels can provide significantly improved outcomes for the 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK. [More]
Texting could promote medication adherence among chronically ill patients

Texting could promote medication adherence among chronically ill patients

Text messages can double the odds of medication adherence in patients with chronic disease. That is the central finding of a new study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]
American Diabetes Association issues statement to address diabetes management in LTC facilities

American Diabetes Association issues statement to address diabetes management in LTC facilities

The care of adults over age 65 with type 2 diabetes is a growing concern: the prevalence of diabetes is highest in this age group and is expected to grow as the U.S. population ages, with many needing care at long-term care (LTC) facilities. [More]
Height affects risk of major non-communicable diseases

Height affects risk of major non-communicable diseases

Height is largely genetically determined, but in recent decades the height of children and adults has steadily increased throughout the world: In adulthood the children are almost always significantly taller than their parents. [More]
Researchers identify new targets that may help prevent and cure colon cancer

Researchers identify new targets that may help prevent and cure colon cancer

When the audio on your television set or smart phone is too loud, you simply turn down the volume. What if we could do the same for the signaling in our bodies that essentially causes normal cells to turn cancerous? New discoveries by researchers at the Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma may point to new ways to do just that. [More]
New gene cut-and-paste methods help correct disease-causing mutation in animal model

New gene cut-and-paste methods help correct disease-causing mutation in animal model

For the first time, researchers have treated an animal model of a genetic disorder using a viral vector to deliver genome-editing components in which the disease- causing mutation has been corrected. [More]
Parents need to take active role in oral health of children

Parents need to take active role in oral health of children

February is National Children's Dental Health Month, an opportunity for parents of toddlers, young children or teenagers to explore questions about keeping your child's teeth clean, your child's first dental visit or how to protect children's smiles. [More]
Lupin Pharmaceuticals releases Metformin HCl ER Tablets

Lupin Pharmaceuticals releases Metformin HCl ER Tablets

Pharma Major Lupin Limited announced today that its US subsidiary, Lupin Pharmaceuticals Inc., has launched its Metformin HCl ER Tablets, 500 mg and 1000 mg to market a generic equivalent of Santarus Inc.'s Glumetza HCl ER Tablets, 500 mg and 1000 mg. [More]
New way to more efficiently deliver CRISPR/Cas9 therapeutic to mice with Tyrosinemia type I

New way to more efficiently deliver CRISPR/Cas9 therapeutic to mice with Tyrosinemia type I

University of Massachusetts Medical School researchers have found a way to more efficiently delivery a CRISPR/Cas9 therapeutic to adult mice with the metabolic disease Tyrosinemia type I that may also prove to be safer for use in humans. [More]
Maternal diet during pregnancy and lactation leads to epigenetic changes in offspring

Maternal diet during pregnancy and lactation leads to epigenetic changes in offspring

As the study shows, a high-fat diet during pregnancy and lactation leads to epigenetic changes in the offspring. These changes affect metabolic pathways regulated by the gut hormone GIP, whereby the adult offspring are more susceptible to obesity and insulin resistance, the precursor to type 2 diabetes. Similar mechanisms cannot be ruled out in humans, according to Pfeiffer. [More]
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