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UCLA research shows epigenetic clock predicts lifespan

UCLA research shows epigenetic clock predicts lifespan

Why do some people lead a perfectly healthy lifestyle yet still die young? A new international study suggests that the answer lies in our DNA. [More]
Study shows ancient grain varieties may help reduce risk factors for CVD

Study shows ancient grain varieties may help reduce risk factors for CVD

Eating bread made with ancient grains as part of a healthy diet could help lower cholesterol and blood glucose levels—leading risk factors for heart attack and stroke—according to new research published in the International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition. [More]
Researchers now developing digital support device to help CF sufferers monitor treatment

Researchers now developing digital support device to help CF sufferers monitor treatment

People with cystic fibrosis (CF) need help to ensure they are getting correct nutrition and the right amount of enzymes. They also need constant reminders. Researchers are now developing a digital support device to promote autonomy, but are finding that this is no easy task. [More]
GACD funds international research projects that aim to prevent, manage chronic lung diseases

GACD funds international research projects that aim to prevent, manage chronic lung diseases

Members of the Global Alliance for Chronic Diseases are funding more than thirteen international research projects into the prevention and management of chronic lung diseases. [More]
Study evaluates link between lowering LDL-C and CV risk reduction across statin and nonstatin therapies

Study evaluates link between lowering LDL-C and CV risk reduction across statin and nonstatin therapies

In a study appearing in the September 27 issue of JAMA, Marc S. Sabatine, M.D., M.P.H., of Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, and colleagues evaluated the association between lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and relative cardiovascular risk reduction across different statin and nonstatin therapies. [More]
New ABT approach results in greater weight loss than gold standard treatment, study shows

New ABT approach results in greater weight loss than gold standard treatment, study shows

A new approach to weight loss called Acceptance-Based Behavioral Treatment (ABT) helped people lose more weight and keep it off longer than those who received only Standard Behavioral Treatment (SBT) - a typical treatment plan encouraging reduced caloric intake and increased physical activity - according to a new randomized controlled clinical trial. [More]
Adolescent girls with family breast cancer history do not experience negative psychological effects

Adolescent girls with family breast cancer history do not experience negative psychological effects

More and more girls are expected to have to confront breast cancer fears as modern genomics technology makes it easier to detect strong risk factors such as inherited BRCA1/2 mutations. [More]
Study provides insights into how insulin resistance, diabetes begin

Study provides insights into how insulin resistance, diabetes begin

Does eating too much sugar cause type 2 diabetes? The answer may not be simple, but a study published Sept. 26 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation adds to growing research linking excessive sugar consumption -- specifically the sugar fructose -- to a rise in metabolic disease worldwide. [More]
Specific high-fat diets linked to increased tumor formation in mouse model of intestinal cancer

Specific high-fat diets linked to increased tumor formation in mouse model of intestinal cancer

A high-fat-diet-induced immune reaction causes inflammation leading to intestinal cancer in a mouse model - even among animals that are not obese -- according to a new study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Case Western Reserve University, the Pacific Northwest Research Institute, and others. [More]
High levels of dietary zinc increases susceptibility to Clostridium difficile infections

High levels of dietary zinc increases susceptibility to Clostridium difficile infections

Too much dietary zinc increases susceptibility to infection by Clostridium difficile - "C. diff" - the most common cause of hospital-acquired infections. [More]
Study suggests calorie-restricted diet can protect mice from abdominal aortic aneurysms

Study suggests calorie-restricted diet can protect mice from abdominal aortic aneurysms

Mice placed on a low-calorie diet are less likely to develop abdominal aortic aneurysms, according to a new study in The Journal of Experimental Medicine. [More]
SLU receives HRSA grant for training family physicians and medical family therapists in behavioral health

SLU receives HRSA grant for training family physicians and medical family therapists in behavioral health

Saint Louis University has received a $1.87 million grant to strengthen behavioral health training for family physicians, who often are the primary physician seen by many adults and children, and for medical family therapists who practice alongside them. [More]
Maternal serum levels of nicotinamide linked to child’s risk of atopic eczema

Maternal serum levels of nicotinamide linked to child’s risk of atopic eczema

Infants whose mothers had a higher level of a particular type of vitamin B during pregnancy have a lower risk of eczema at age 12 months, new Southampton research has shown. [More]
Higher proportion of CKD patients receive renal replacement therapy in the U.S. than other countries

Higher proportion of CKD patients receive renal replacement therapy in the U.S. than other countries

A new study indicates that a much higher proportion of patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD)—even those ≥85 years of age—receive renal replacement therapy (RRT) such as maintenance dialysis or kidney transplantation in the United States than in other developed countries. [More]
Amount of gluten triggers genetic risk of celiac disease, research shows

Amount of gluten triggers genetic risk of celiac disease, research shows

The amount of gluten could be a more important clue than breast-feeding or the timing of the introduction of gluten for continued research into the causes of celiac disease (gluten intolerance). [More]
Review highlights anxiety may lead to serious health consequences in dialysis patients

Review highlights anxiety may lead to serious health consequences in dialysis patients

A new review looks at the potential effects of anxiety on a vulnerable patient population: individuals undergoing hemodialysis for the treatment of kidney failure. [More]
Decrease in physical activity and concentration of fish oil linked to depressed mood among veterans

Decrease in physical activity and concentration of fish oil linked to depressed mood among veterans

Low concentration of fish oil in the blood and lack of physical activity may contribute to the high levels of depressed mood among soldiers returning from combat, according to researchers, including a Texas A&M University professor and his former doctoral student. [More]
Study shows maritime pine bark extract may be effective in limiting muscle loss due to aging

Study shows maritime pine bark extract may be effective in limiting muscle loss due to aging

A new peer-reviewed, published study shows French maritime pine bark extract, Pycnogenol, may be effective in curbing muscle loss that occurs with aging – a natural process that leads to sarcopenia, a common condition affecting adults as early as age 65. [More]
Bile acid transporter inhibitors can prevent NASH in mice, study shows

Bile acid transporter inhibitors can prevent NASH in mice, study shows

Drugs that interfere with bile acid recycling can prevent several aspects of NASH (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis) in mice fed a high-fat diet, scientists from Emory University School of Medicine and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta have shown. [More]
UofL researchers receive NIH funding to explore how environmental exposures influence health of children

UofL researchers receive NIH funding to explore how environmental exposures influence health of children

The National Institutes of Health today announced a team of researchers headed by Janice Sullivan, M.D., of the University of Louisville is among grant recipients nationwide receiving funding for a seven-year, multicenter initiative called Environmental influences on Child Health Outcomes. [More]
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