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Ceres receives U.S. patent for genetic sequence obtained from soybean

Ceres receives U.S. patent for genetic sequence obtained from soybean

Ceres, Inc., an agricultural biotechnology company, has been awarded a U.S. patent for a genetic sequence derived from soybean, covering uses of the gene in areas such as research, product development and plant transformation. [More]
Soy supplement does not improve lung function, clinical outcomes in patients with asthma

Soy supplement does not improve lung function, clinical outcomes in patients with asthma

Although some data have suggested that supplementation with soy isoflavone may be an effective treatment for patients with poor asthma control, a randomized trial that included nearly 400 children and adults found that use of the supplement did not result in improved lung function or clinical outcomes, including asthma symptoms and episodes of poor asthma control, according to a study in the May 26 issue of JAMA. [More]
Risk for obesity-associated diseases significantly higher for males than females

Risk for obesity-associated diseases significantly higher for males than females

Obesity may be tougher on male immune systems than females, a new study in mice at the University of Michigan Medical School suggests. [More]
Mediterranean-style diet can reduce womb cancer risk by half

Mediterranean-style diet can reduce womb cancer risk by half

Women who eat a Mediterranean diet could cut their risk of womb cancer by more than half (57 per cent), according to a study published today (Wednesday) in the British Journal of Cancer. [More]
Splicing pattern of obesity, type 2 diabetes genes may contribute to pathophysiology of obesity

Splicing pattern of obesity, type 2 diabetes genes may contribute to pathophysiology of obesity

Alternative splicing of obesity and type 2 diabetes related genes may contribute to the pathophysiology of obesity, according to research from the University of Eastern Finland. Obesity leads to changes in the splicing pattern of metabolically relevant genes such as TCF7L2 and INSR, resulting in impaired insulin action. [More]
National Jewish Health researcher calls for men to be included in osteoporosis screening guidelines

National Jewish Health researcher calls for men to be included in osteoporosis screening guidelines

Most people associate osteoporosis with women. But the truth is, one in four men over the age of 50 will break a bone as a result of this condition. That's more men than will have prostate cancer, according to the National Osteoporosis Foundation. [More]
Researchers use American College of Cardiology registry to improve cardiovascular care delivery in India

Researchers use American College of Cardiology registry to improve cardiovascular care delivery in India

Despite challenges, it is feasible to collect and study the quality of outpatient cardiovascular care in a resource-limited environment like India, according to a pilot study published today in the Journal of the American Heart Association. [More]
Researcher uses short pulsed electric fields to preserve milk

Researcher uses short pulsed electric fields to preserve milk

Even though much of the population in developing countries is involved in agriculture, food security is virtually out of reach. Often the only resort is to purchase a cow, buffalo, or sheep, to provide a steady supply of fresh milk, a nutritious staple of a daily diet. But how to preserve it safely? Refrigeration and boiling are costly -- and often impossible due to sporadic electricity. [More]
Vitamin E helps build strong muscles

Vitamin E helps build strong muscles

Body builders have it right: vitamin E does help build strong muscles, and scientists appear to have figured out one important way it does it. [More]
Leptin resistance not a possible cause of obesity, scientists find

Leptin resistance not a possible cause of obesity, scientists find

For years, scientists have pointed to leptin resistance as a possible cause of obesity. Research led by investigators at the University of Cincinnati (UC) Metabolic Diseases Institute, however, found that leptin action isn't the culprit. [More]
Too much or too little sleep may up stroke risk in hypertensive patients

Too much or too little sleep may up stroke risk in hypertensive patients

High blood pressure, or hypertension, affects one third of--or 70 million--US adults, and the healthcare costs associated with treating the disease are approximately $46 billion. [More]
Information needs of cancer survivors differ depending on the type of cancer

Information needs of cancer survivors differ depending on the type of cancer

Judging by the nature and topics of their information seeking, cancer patients' information needs appear to differ depending on the type of cancer they have and where they are in their survivorship. [More]
Handshakes better than your blood pressure at assessing your health

Handshakes better than your blood pressure at assessing your health

The firmness of your hand grip is better than your blood pressure at assessing your health, Hamilton researchers have found, and reduced muscular strength, measured by your grip, is consistently linked with early death, disability and illness. [More]
Human microbiome contains unique fingerprints, shows study

Human microbiome contains unique fingerprints, shows study

A new study shows that the microbial communities we carry in and on our bodies—known as the human microbiome—have the potential to uniquely identify individuals, much like a fingerprint. [More]
Gadusol compound can provide a systemic sunscreen to humans

Gadusol compound can provide a systemic sunscreen to humans

Researchers have discovered why many animal species can spend their whole lives outdoors with no apparent concern about high levels of solar exposure: they make their own sunscreen. [More]
Serotonin and TGF-beta pathways link diet to health and ageing

Serotonin and TGF-beta pathways link diet to health and ageing

Diet exerts a major impact on health and ageing. The nervous system plays an important role in this process but, thus far, how food signals are interpreted by the nervous system has been a mystery. [More]
Bronchitis can cause pneumonia, says Loyola physician

Bronchitis can cause pneumonia, says Loyola physician

When a cold has lasted too long or a cough is especially bothersome, it's important to see a medical professional. [More]
Eating Mediterranean diet helps delay cognitive decline

Eating Mediterranean diet helps delay cognitive decline

Professor of Preventive Medicine at the University of Valencia Dolors Corella is part of the multidisciplinary team conducting the Predimed study, which has found that eating a Mediterranean diet, enriched with olive oil or nuts, helps delay cognitive decline. [More]
Transgender people at greater risk for eating disorders

Transgender people at greater risk for eating disorders

Transgender and non-transgender lesbian, gay and bisexual students are at greater risk for eating disorders, finds a new study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
Childhood cancer survivors more likely to be obese than healthy peers

Childhood cancer survivors more likely to be obese than healthy peers

Childhood cancer survivors - especially those whose treatment included brain irradiation or chemotherapy with glucocorticoids - are 14 percent more likely to be obese than their healthy peers. [More]
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