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Estrogens are a family of related molecules that stimulate the development and maintenance of female characteristics and sexual reproduction.

The natural estrogens produced by women are steroid molecules, which means that they are derived from a particular type of molecular skeleton containing four rings of carbon atoms, giving the shape shown here. The most prevalent forms of human estrogen are estradiol and estrone. Both are produced and secreted by the ovaries, although estrone is also made in the adrenal glands and other organs.
UTSA, UTHSCSA researchers to jointly develop next-generation breast cancer treatment drugs

UTSA, UTHSCSA researchers to jointly develop next-generation breast cancer treatment drugs

Stanton McHardy, associate professor of chemistry and director of the Center for Innovative Drug Discovery in The University of Texas at San Antonio College of Sciences, is partnering on a $1.9 million award to develop next-generation breast cancer treatment drugs. [More]
Two orphan receptor proteins exert fatal double whammy effect against glioblastoma cells

Two orphan receptor proteins exert fatal double whammy effect against glioblastoma cells

Two related proteins exert a lethal double whammy effect against glioblastoma cells when activated with a small molecule, say researchers at Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center. [More]
Research outlines new model for measuring acceptability of contraceptive vaginal ring

Research outlines new model for measuring acceptability of contraceptive vaginal ring

The Population Council published new research in the November issue of the journal Contraception demonstrating that an investigational one-year contraceptive vaginal ring containing Nestorone and ethinyl estradiol was found to be highly acceptable among women enrolled in a Phase 3 clinical trial. [More]
Researchers identify 53 existing drugs that may block Ebola virus from entering human cells

Researchers identify 53 existing drugs that may block Ebola virus from entering human cells

Researchers found 53 existing drugs that may keep the Ebola virus from entering human cells, a key step in the process of infection, according to a study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the National Institutes of Health, and published today in the Nature Press journal Emerging Microbes and Infections. [More]
Investigational drug increases PFS in patients with advanced breast cancer

Investigational drug increases PFS in patients with advanced breast cancer

In a groundbreaking study that offers new hope for women with advanced breast cancer, researchers from UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have published final clinical trial results that showed the amount of time patients were on treatment without their cancer worsening (called progression-free survival) was effectively doubled in women with advanced breast cancer who took the experimental drug palbociclib. [More]
Two-drug combination before surgery benefits women with triple-negative breast cancer

Two-drug combination before surgery benefits women with triple-negative breast cancer

A breast cancer specialist and clinical researcher at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island presented research yesterday at the 2014 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium showing that adding either the chemotherapy drug carboplatin or the blood vessel-targeting drug bevacizumab to the standard treatment of chemotherapy before surgery helped women who have the basal-like subtype of triple-negative breast cancer. [More]
Study sheds light on clinical and biological characteristics of male breast cancer

Study sheds light on clinical and biological characteristics of male breast cancer

Results of the EORTC10085/TBCRC/BIG/NABCG International Male Breast Cancer Program conducted in both Europe and in the United States and presented at the 2014 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium found significant improvement in survival for men with breast cancer, but this improvement was not as good as that observed for women. [More]
Three studies reveal effects of blocking androgen receptors in breast cancer

Three studies reveal effects of blocking androgen receptors in breast cancer

Three studies presented by University of Colorado Cancer Center researchers at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium 2014 demonstrate the effects of blocking androgen receptors in breast cancer. [More]
Drugs delay disease progression for women with hormone-receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer

Drugs delay disease progression for women with hormone-receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer

A new combination of cancer drugs delayed disease progression for patients with hormone-receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer, according to a multi-center phase II trial. The findings of the randomized study (S6-03) were presented at the 2014 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 6-9, by Kerin Adelson, M.D., assistant professor of medical oncology at Yale Cancer Center and chief quality officer at Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale-New Haven. [More]
New therapeutic approach for women with estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer

New therapeutic approach for women with estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer

Loyola researchers and collaborators have reported promising results from a novel therapeutic approach for women with estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer. [More]
Male hormone testosterone may increase risk of colon cancer

Male hormone testosterone may increase risk of colon cancer

Previous cancer research has revealed that women are less likely than men to suffer from non-sex specific cancers such as cancer of the colon, pancreas and stomach. Scientists theorized that perhaps this trend was due to a protecting effect created by female hormones, such as estrogen, that help prevent tumors from forming. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have found evidence suggesting that the male hormone testosterone may actually be a contributing factor in the formation of colon cancer tumors. [More]
Use of HF-WBI for patients with early-stage breast cancer increases 17.4%, study finds

Use of HF-WBI for patients with early-stage breast cancer increases 17.4%, study finds

The use of hypofractionated whole-breast irradiation (HF-WBI) for patients with early-stage breast cancer increased 17.4 percent from 2004 to 2011, and patients are more likely to receive HF-WBI compared to conventionally fractionated whole-breast irradiation (CF-WBI) when they are treated at an academic center or live ≥50 miles away from a cancer center, according to a study published in the December 1, 2014 issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics (Red Journal), the official scientific journal of the American Society for Radiation Oncology. [More]
Heat-shock protein 90 enables ER+ breast cancers to develop resistance to hormonal therapy

Heat-shock protein 90 enables ER+ breast cancers to develop resistance to hormonal therapy

Long known for its ability to help organisms successfully adapt to environmentally stressful conditions, the highly conserved molecular chaperone heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) also enables estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancers to develop resistance to hormonal therapy. [More]
Researchers identify possible prognostic biomarker in triple-negative breast cancer

Researchers identify possible prognostic biomarker in triple-negative breast cancer

"Triple-negative" breast cancer (TNBC) occurs in patients whose cells do not express receptors for estrogen, progesterone, and/or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (ER-/PR-/HER2-). [More]
Novartis to highlight advances in blood, breast cancer research at ASH and SABCS 2014

Novartis to highlight advances in blood, breast cancer research at ASH and SABCS 2014

Novartis will highlight more than 250 abstracts demonstrating advances in blood and breast cancer research at the upcoming American Society of Hematology (ASH) annual meeting December 6-9, and CTRC-AACR San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS) December 9-13. [More]
Mayo Clinic recommends genetic screening for patients with triple-negative breast cancer

Mayo Clinic recommends genetic screening for patients with triple-negative breast cancer

Most patients with triple-negative breast cancer should undergo genetic testing for mutations in known breast cancer predisposition genes, including BRCA1 and BRCA2, a Mayo Clinic-led study has found. [More]
Ligand indazole chloride improves motor function, study shows

Ligand indazole chloride improves motor function, study shows

Multiple sclerosis (MS), an autoimmune disease of the brain and spinal cord, affects about 2.3 million people worldwide (400,000 in the United States). Affecting more women than men, it can be seen at any age, although it is most commonly diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 40. [More]
Surprise WHI finding points to age, not menopause, as a risk factor for pelvic organ prolapse

Surprise WHI finding points to age, not menopause, as a risk factor for pelvic organ prolapse

Removing ovaries at hysterectomy does not increase a woman's risk of pelvic organ prolapse after menopause. In fact, removing ovaries lowers the risk of prolapse. This surprising finding from a Women's Health Initiative study was published online this week in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society. [More]
MACROD2 gene may explain why some breast cancers are resistant to tamoxifen

MACROD2 gene may explain why some breast cancers are resistant to tamoxifen

After mining the genetic records of thousands of breast cancer patients, researchers from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have identified a gene whose presence may explain why some breast cancers are resistant to tamoxifen, a widely used hormone treatment generally used after surgery, radiation and other chemotherapy. [More]
VeraVia releases information to help men achieve better weight loss strategy

VeraVia releases information to help men achieve better weight loss strategy

A recent study published in the British Journal of General Practice found that physicians have difficulty visually diagnosing obesity in men. San Diego fitness retreat VeraVia has released information for men to help them understand how their own weight loss differs from women. VeraVia founder and CEO Wyatt Chapman says, "Achieving the best weight loss strategy for your body and lifestyle can be complicated. [More]