Estrogen News and Research RSS Feed - Estrogen News and Research

Estrogens are a family of related molecules that stimulate the development and maintenance of female characteristics and sexual reproduction.

The natural estrogens produced by women are steroid molecules, which means that they are derived from a particular type of molecular skeleton containing four rings of carbon atoms, giving the shape shown here. The most prevalent forms of human estrogen are estradiol and estrone. Both are produced and secreted by the ovaries, although estrone is also made in the adrenal glands and other organs.
New research provides insight into how estrogen modulates fear learning

New research provides insight into how estrogen modulates fear learning

Low estrogen levels may make women more susceptible to the development of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at some points in their menstrual cycles or lifetimes, while high estrogen levels may be protective. [More]
Exercise helps mitigate side effects of AIs in breast cancer survivors

Exercise helps mitigate side effects of AIs in breast cancer survivors

A researcher at Syracuse University has simple advice for breast cancer survivors struggling with the side effects of Aromatase Inhibitors (AIs): exercise. [More]
Protein involved in pancreatic cancer development plays more complicated role, study finds

Protein involved in pancreatic cancer development plays more complicated role, study finds

A protein thought to fuel pancreatic cancer development plays a much more complicated role, a new study finds. [More]
Engineered E. coli bacteria can help detect environmentally relevant concentrations of EDCs

Engineered E. coli bacteria can help detect environmentally relevant concentrations of EDCs

Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have been implicated in the development of obesity, diabetes and cancer and are found in a wide array of products including pesticides, plastics and pharmaceuticals. [More]
Hormonal fluctuations make women more sensitive to addictive properties of cocaine, study reveals

Hormonal fluctuations make women more sensitive to addictive properties of cocaine, study reveals

Hormonal fluctuations women undergo make them particularly sensitive, compared to men, to the addictive properties of cocaine, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published January 10 in the journal Nature Communications. [More]
Study examines role of risk factors in development of ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancers

Study examines role of risk factors in development of ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancers

Karla Kerlikowske, MD, and team recently published a paper in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute that examined the role of common risk factors in the development of ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancers. [More]
Scientists gain new insights into molecular mechanisms of breast cancer development

Scientists gain new insights into molecular mechanisms of breast cancer development

Why does breast cancer develop and how come certain patients are resistant to established therapies? Researchers from the University of Basel have gained new insights into the molecular processes in breast tissue. [More]
Research findings may provide new treatment for prevention of cancer metastasis

Research findings may provide new treatment for prevention of cancer metastasis

Breast cancer metastasis, the process by which cancer spreads, may be prevented through the new use of a class of drugs already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. [More]
Drug that improves blood flow in damaged heart may be possible treatment option for TNBC

Drug that improves blood flow in damaged heart may be possible treatment option for TNBC

Researchers are looking at a drug once used to improve blood flow in damaged hearts in thousands of patients as a possible treatment option for triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). [More]
TSRI researchers develop new approach to find how environmental estrogens impact public health

TSRI researchers develop new approach to find how environmental estrogens impact public health

Breast cancer researchers from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have developed a novel approach for identifying how chemicals in the environment—called environmental estrogens—can produce infertility, abnormal reproductive development, including “precocious puberty,” and promote breast cancer. [More]
NIH researchers identify molecular mechanisms that may underlie woman's susceptibility to PMDD

NIH researchers identify molecular mechanisms that may underlie woman's susceptibility to PMDD

National Institutes of Health researchers have discovered molecular mechanisms that may underlie a woman's susceptibility to disabling irritability, sadness, and anxiety in the days leading up to her menstrual period. [More]
TSRI scientists develop new approach for understanding diverse effects of endocrine-disruptors

TSRI scientists develop new approach for understanding diverse effects of endocrine-disruptors

Breast cancer researchers from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have developed a novel approach for identifying how chemicals in the environment--called environmental estrogens--can produce infertility, abnormal reproductive development, including "precocious puberty," and promote breast cancer. [More]
New molecular imaging technologies can make it easier to treat cancers, minimize side effects

New molecular imaging technologies can make it easier to treat cancers, minimize side effects

New molecular imaging technologies can make it easier to diagnose, monitor, and treat cancers while potentially saving patients from undergoing therapies that are likely to be ineffective and playing a role in minimizing side effects, according to experts from the Abramson Cancer Center and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
U-M researchers identify gene expression linked to gender differences in autoimmune diseases

U-M researchers identify gene expression linked to gender differences in autoimmune diseases

Women represent nearly 8 out of every 10 people with autoimmune diseases. Although the statistics are well-known, the scientific community is still trying to figure out why women's immune systems are more likely to become overactive and attack their own healthy cells. [More]
Hormonal contraception least likely to be linked to thromboembolic events in diabetic women

Hormonal contraception least likely to be linked to thromboembolic events in diabetic women

Strokes and heart attacks are rare for women with diabetes who use hormonal contraception, with the safest options being intrauterine devices (IUDs) and under-the-skin implants, new research published in Diabetes Care shows. [More]
Protective effect of ER-beta more pronounced in breast cancer patients who undergo chemotherapy

Protective effect of ER-beta more pronounced in breast cancer patients who undergo chemotherapy

It is known from previous research that the ER-beta estrogen receptor often has a protective effect. A new study from Lund University in Sweden has found that this effect is more pronounced in patients that undergo chemotherapy. [More]
Multifunctional RNA nanoparticles could overcome treatment resistance in breast cancer, study shows

Multifunctional RNA nanoparticles could overcome treatment resistance in breast cancer, study shows

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine have been able to generate multifunctional RNA nanoparticles that could overcome treatment resistance in breast cancer, potentially making existing treatments more effective in these patients. [More]
Two drug combinations may reduce mortality rates in breast cancer patients, study reveals

Two drug combinations may reduce mortality rates in breast cancer patients, study reveals

Patient health records revealed two drug combinations that may reduce mortality rates in breast cancer patients, according to a study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
Depression drug can alleviate joint pain in postmenopausal women treated for breast cancer

Depression drug can alleviate joint pain in postmenopausal women treated for breast cancer

A drug typically used to treat depression and anxiety can significantly reduce joint pain in postmenopausal women being treated for early stage breast cancer, according to new SWOG research to be presented Friday at a special plenary presentation at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. [More]
Controversial hormone could fight against recurring breast cancers

Controversial hormone could fight against recurring breast cancers

An international team of researchers involving the University of Adelaide is tackling the controversy over what some scientists consider to be a "harmful" hormone, arguing that it could be a game changer in the fight against recurring breast cancers that are resistant to standard treatments. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement