Melanoma News and Research RSS Feed - Melanoma News and Research

Melanoma is a form of cancer that begins in melanocytes (cells that make the pigment melanin). It may begin in a mole (skin melanoma), but can also begin in other pigmented tissues, such as in the eye or in the intestines.
Vice President Biden to host Cancer Moonshot Summit in Washington, D.C.

Vice President Biden to host Cancer Moonshot Summit in Washington, D.C.

Vice President Biden and Dr. Jill Biden will host a Cancer Moonshot Summit in Washington, D.C. at the White House. Cheryl Willman, MD, Director and CEO of The University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center, will attend. [More]
Taking ipilimumab, nivolumab drugs may increase risk of developing rheumatologic diseases

Taking ipilimumab, nivolumab drugs may increase risk of developing rheumatologic diseases

Case reports on 13 cancer patients suggest that a small number of cancer patients taking the immunotherapy drugs ipilimumab and nivolumab may be at some higher-than-normal risk of developing autoimmune joint and tissue diseases, including inflammatory arthritis, according to a preliminary study by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers. [More]
Telephone counseling can help make cancer genetic services more accessible to rural women

Telephone counseling can help make cancer genetic services more accessible to rural women

Ever since Angelina Jolie used cancer genetic counseling and testing to learn about her risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, many other women have chosen to do the same. [More]
RVFV uses cancer pathway to hijack host cell and cause infection

RVFV uses cancer pathway to hijack host cell and cause infection

Viruses can't live without us -- literally. As obligate parasites, viruses need a host cell to survive and grow. Scientists are exploiting this characteristic by developing therapeutics that close off pathways necessary for viral infection, essentially stopping pathogens in their tracks. [More]
New immunotherapy treatment could change the way cancer is treated

New immunotherapy treatment could change the way cancer is treated

In late 2015, former President Jimmy Carter announced that he was free of the metastatic melanoma that had spread to his liver and brain. In addition to surgery and radiation, Carter was treated with an immunotherapy drug, a new approach in cancer treatment that has a promising outlook. [More]
Already-approved drugs can fight apoptosis evasion in cancer

Already-approved drugs can fight apoptosis evasion in cancer

Cancer cells don't die when they're supposed to. Animal and human bodies follow an orderly process of birthing new cells and killing old ones. But cancer cells escape programmed cell death, called apoptosis, and multiply uncontrollably. [More]
Interdisciplinary approach to improve cancer treatments

Interdisciplinary approach to improve cancer treatments

Whether it focuses on determining why certain cancers develop drug resistance, finding a way to improve individual's immune systems or better understanding cancer cell evolution, fundamental scientific research will "stand up to cancer" with three new awards from the National Science Foundation. [More]
Researchers reveal how cancer cells use energy to move and divide so quickly

Researchers reveal how cancer cells use energy to move and divide so quickly

Cancer cells and normal cells both divide and move, but with cancer cells it's like they're on steroids: everything is bigger, faster, more. [More]
Veterinarian conducts clinical trials to improve cancer treatment for animals, humans

Veterinarian conducts clinical trials to improve cancer treatment for animals, humans

Raelene Wouda's passion for improving cancer treatment starts with our four-legged friends. [More]
Study opens up new strategy to make immunotherapy more effective for different cancer types

Study opens up new strategy to make immunotherapy more effective for different cancer types

By combining local radiation therapy and anti-cancer vaccines with checkpoint inhibitors, researchers from the University of Chicago, working with mice, were able to increase the response rate for these new immunotherapy agents. [More]
NCCN educational resources provide insight for patients with Mycosis Fungoides

NCCN educational resources provide insight for patients with Mycosis Fungoides

Mycosis Fungoides is a very rare form of lymphoma affecting approximately 1,000 people per year in the United States. [More]
New ultrasensitive magnetometer probe system for detecting cancer moves towards commercialisation

New ultrasensitive magnetometer probe system for detecting cancer moves towards commercialisation

Researchers at the University of South Australia’s Future Industries Institute have joined forces with New Zealand-based nanoparticle specialist Boutiq Science and major IP investor, Powerhouse Ventures. [More]
Study provides new insights into development of skin-depigmenting disease vitiligo

Study provides new insights into development of skin-depigmenting disease vitiligo

Researchers at the University of Bonn and the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität of Munich have decoded a new mechanism of how the immune system can specifically attack pigmented cells of the skin. [More]
PCP screening could be effective way to improve early melanoma diagnosis

PCP screening could be effective way to improve early melanoma diagnosis

Skin cancer screenings performed by primary care physicians (PCPs) during routine office visits improve the detection of potentially deadly melanomas and find them in earlier stages, according to new research from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. [More]
Existing immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab shows promise for specific sarcoma subtypes

Existing immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab shows promise for specific sarcoma subtypes

An existing cancer immunotherapy drug reduces tumor size in some types of rare connective tissue cancers, called sarcomas, report researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute. [More]
Combination immunotherapy may be better than one to combat metastatic melanoma

Combination immunotherapy may be better than one to combat metastatic melanoma

A new metastatic melanoma study suggests that a combination of two immunotherapies may be better than one. [More]
Pembrolizumab drug shows significant clinical responses in metastatic head and neck cancer patients

Pembrolizumab drug shows significant clinical responses in metastatic head and neck cancer patients

Treating head and neck cancer patients with recurrent or metastatic disease with the PD-1 inhibitor pembrolizumab resulted in significant clinical responses in a fifth of the patients from a phase II clinical trial, researchers at the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania and other institutions reported at the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting. [More]
Cobimetinib combined with vemurafenib shows added benefit for melanoma with BRAF V600 mutation

Cobimetinib combined with vemurafenib shows added benefit for melanoma with BRAF V600 mutation

Cobimetinib has been approved since November 2015 in combination with vemurafenib for the treatment of adults with advanced, i.e. metastatic or unresectable, melanoma with a BRAF V600 mutation. [More]
Radiation therapy with bevacizumab/pembrolizumab improves outcomes in glioma patients

Radiation therapy with bevacizumab/pembrolizumab improves outcomes in glioma patients

Patients with recurrent high-grade glioma brain tumors have few effective treatment options and the majority of available therapies do not improve survival. Moffitt Cancer Center will present preliminary results from a phase 1 study testing whether the addition of pembrolizumab to radiation therapy and bevacizumab is safe and can control tumor growth for these patients. [More]
Gene dysregulation makes immune therapies less effective against metastatic melanoma

Gene dysregulation makes immune therapies less effective against metastatic melanoma

Patients who don't respond to treatments that use their own immune cells to destroy tumors, called tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, share changes in mechanisms that switch genes on or off in those cells, according to study results presented at the annual meeting of the American Society for Clinical Oncology on June 4 in Chicago. [More]
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