Melanoma News and Research RSS Feed - Melanoma News and Research

Melanoma is a form of cancer that begins in melanocytes (cells that make the pigment melanin). It may begin in a mole (skin melanoma), but can also begin in other pigmented tissues, such as in the eye or in the intestines.
Immunotherapy expert discusses the concept of precision immunology and personalized medicine

Immunotherapy expert discusses the concept of precision immunology and personalized medicine

With President Obama's recent State of the Union speech addressing the launch of a national precision medicine initiative to further tackle cancer and other diseases, a leading immunotherapy expert from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey weighs in on where we stand with precision immunology and personalized medicine and what needs to be accomplished. [More]
HCI researchers find cell mechanism that may trigger pancreatic cancer

HCI researchers find cell mechanism that may trigger pancreatic cancer

Researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah have found that defects in how cells are squeezed out of overcrowded tissue to die, a process called extrusion, may be a mechanism by which pancreatic cancer begins. From these findings, they may have identified an effective way to reverse the defective extrusion's effects without destroying normal tissues nearby. [More]
Yale researcher receives 2015 Frontiers of Knowledge Award in Biomedicine

Yale researcher receives 2015 Frontiers of Knowledge Award in Biomedicine

A Spanish foundation has awarded a major scientific prize to Yale researcher Joseph Schlessinger and two colleagues in recognition of their work leading to the first personalized treatments for cancer. The 2015 Frontiers of Knowledge Award in Biomedicine from the Madrid-based BBVA Foundation includes a €400,000 cash prize. [More]
Researchers reveal role of epigenetic factors in malignant skin cancer

Researchers reveal role of epigenetic factors in malignant skin cancer

Melanoma, the most aggressive of all skin cancer strains, is often fatal for patients due to the pronounced formation of metastases. Until now, a melanoma's rampant growth was mainly attributed to genetic causes, such as mutations in certain genes. However, researchers from the University of Zurich now reveal that so-called epigenetic factors play a role in the formation of metastases in malignant skin cancer. This opens up new possibilities for future cancer treatments. [More]
Researchers reveal how melanoma becomes resistant to promising new drug combo therapy

Researchers reveal how melanoma becomes resistant to promising new drug combo therapy

In a new study led by UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center member Dr. Roger Lo, researchers have uncovered how melanoma becomes resistant to a promising new drug combo therapy utilizing BRAF+MEK inhibitors in patients after an initial period of tumor shrinkage. [More]
Children of melanoma survivors need better sun protection, says UCLA researchers

Children of melanoma survivors need better sun protection, says UCLA researchers

In a groundbreaking new study, UCLA researchers have discovered that children of melanoma survivors are not adhering optimally to sun protection recommendations. This is concerning as sunburns are a major risk factor for melanoma, and children of survivors are at increased risk for developing the disease as adults. [More]
Researchers find mechanism that leads to resistance to targeted therapy in melanoma patients

Researchers find mechanism that leads to resistance to targeted therapy in melanoma patients

Moffitt Cancer Center researchers have discovered a mechanism that leads to resistance to targeted therapy in melanoma patients and are investigating strategies to counteract it. Targeted biological therapy can reduce toxicity and improve outcomes for many cancer patients, when compared to the adverse effects of standard chemotherapeutic drugs. [More]

British Skin Foundation urges people to check their loved ones moles this Valentine’s Day

Valentine’s Day is fast approaching and this year the British Skin Foundation is urging people to check your loved ones moles! Whether it’s your boyfriend, girlfriend, spouse, friend or family – take the time to check for changes in moles. [More]
Family history could help physicians identify prostate cancer risk

Family history could help physicians identify prostate cancer risk

A discovery by researchers at Huntsman Cancer Institute shows that looking at whether a man's uncles and great-grandparents, among other second- and third-degree relatives, had prostate cancer could be as important as looking at whether his father had prostate cancer. A more complete family history would give physicians a new tool to decide whether or not a PSA test was appropriate. [More]

Dartmouth investigators create fast-track research tool to study mouse melanoma cell lines

Melanoma in humans is on the rise, with one in 50 individuals likely to have the disease. By developing cell lines that grow readily in culture, Dartmouth investigators led by Constance Brinckerhoff, PhD have created a fast-track research tool that remains applicable to many scientists who use mouse melanoma as a model system. [More]
Can-Fite BioPharma completes RA Phase III study of lead drug candidate CF101

Can-Fite BioPharma completes RA Phase III study of lead drug candidate CF101

Can-Fite BioPharma Ltd., a biotechnology company with a pipeline of proprietary small molecule drugs that address inflammatory and cancer diseases, announced today that it completed the design of the Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Phase III study of its lead drug candidate CF101. [More]
Researchers identify key events that prompt cancer cells to develop resistance to lethal therapies

Researchers identify key events that prompt cancer cells to develop resistance to lethal therapies

A team of researchers led by Duke Cancer Institute has identified key events that prompt certain cancer cells to develop resistance to otherwise lethal therapies. [More]
Researchers identify mutations that destabilize DNA structure that turns a gene off

Researchers identify mutations that destabilize DNA structure that turns a gene off

Researchers at the University of Louisville's James Graham Brown Cancer Center have identified for the first time mutations that destabilize a DNA structure that turns a gene off. These mutations occur at four specific sites in what is known as the "hTERT promoter" in more than 75 percent of glioblastomas and melanomas. [More]
Pivotal trial of Elios melanoma vaccine to be conducted at top U.S. cancer hospitals

Pivotal trial of Elios melanoma vaccine to be conducted at top U.S. cancer hospitals

Elios Therapeutics, LLC recently received FDA approval of its Investigational New Drug (IND) application and its randomized phase IIb trial planned to enroll 120 stage III and IV (resected) melanoma patients to assess the ability of a personalized vaccine to prevent recurrence. [More]
Can-Fite BioPharma begins dosing in CF102 Phase II liver cancer trial

Can-Fite BioPharma begins dosing in CF102 Phase II liver cancer trial

Can-Fite BioPharma Ltd., a biotechnology company advancing a pipeline of proprietary small molecule drugs that address cancer and inflammatory diseases, today announced that it has dosed the first patient in a Phase II trial for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of liver cancer. [More]
Pre-clinical studies confirm TRXE-009 as new potential treatment for melanoma

Pre-clinical studies confirm TRXE-009 as new potential treatment for melanoma

Novogen Limited, Australian/US biotechnology company, today announces that it has confirmed that its lead candidate product, TRXE-009, originally developed for the treatment of brain cancers, has been shown in pre-clinical studies also to be highly active against melanoma. [More]
Penn study has implications for developing new cell-based treatments for skin disease

Penn study has implications for developing new cell-based treatments for skin disease

As the main component of connective tissue in the body, fibroblasts are the most common type of cell. Taking advantage of that ready availability, scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, the Wistar Institute, Boston University School of Medicine, and New Jersey Institute of Technology have discovered a way to repurpose fibroblasts into functional melanocytes, the body's pigment-producing cells. [More]
Andor's Komet software used to automatically score modified 3D 'Comet' assay results

Andor's Komet software used to automatically score modified 3D 'Comet' assay results

With cancer rates rising worldwide, and Cancer Research UK predicting that the lifetime risk of cancer will reach 50% by 2027, the need for early diagnosis is overwhelming. Now, a British research group has published details of a simple empirical test to detect any early-stage cancer, relying on Andor's Komet software to automatically score the modified 3D 'Comet' assay results. [More]
New technique allows rapid, large-scale studies of gene function

New technique allows rapid, large-scale studies of gene function

Using a gene-editing system originally developed to delete specific genes, MIT researchers have now shown that they can reliably turn on any gene of their choosing in living cells. [More]
Myriad Genetics highlights three new studies at SABCS 2014

Myriad Genetics highlights three new studies at SABCS 2014

Myriad Genetics, Inc. today announced results from a new study that demonstrated the ability of the myRisk Hereditary Cancer test to detect 105 percent more mutations in cancer causing genes than conventional BRCA testing alone. The Company also presented two key studies in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) that show the myChoice HRD test accurately predicted response to platinum-based therapy in patients with early-stage TNBC and that the BRACAnalysis molecular diagnostic test significantly predicted response to platinum-based drugs in patients with metastatic TNBC. [More]