Melanoma News and Research RSS Feed - Melanoma News and Research

Melanoma is a form of cancer that begins in melanocytes (cells that make the pigment melanin). It may begin in a mole (skin melanoma), but can also begin in other pigmented tissues, such as in the eye or in the intestines.
Researchers identify genetic signatures in melanoma tumors that predict response to immunotherapy

Researchers identify genetic signatures in melanoma tumors that predict response to immunotherapy

A team led by Ludwig and Memorial Sloan Kettering (MSK) researchers has published a landmark study on the genetic basis of response to a powerful cancer therapy known as immune checkpoint blockade. [More]
New research suggests potential role for MEK inhibitors in type 2 diabetes

New research suggests potential role for MEK inhibitors in type 2 diabetes

A research team led by Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute has uncovered surprising new findings that underscore the role of an important signaling pathway, already known to be critical in cancer, in the development of type 2 diabetes. [More]
Unique immunochemotherapy approach to treating pancreatic cancer

Unique immunochemotherapy approach to treating pancreatic cancer

VCU Massey Cancer Center and VCU Institute of Molecular Medicine researchers discovered a unique approach to treating pancreatic cancer that may be potentially safe and effective. The treatment method involves immunochemotherapy - a combination of chemotherapy and immunotherapy, which uses the patient's own immune system to help fight against disease. [More]
Study identifies genetic alterations that contribute to growth and recurrence of Ewing sarcoma

Study identifies genetic alterations that contribute to growth and recurrence of Ewing sarcoma

An international collaboration has identified frequent mutations in two genes that often occur together in Ewing sarcoma (EWS) and that define a subtype of the cancer associated with reduced survival. [More]
Study reports anti-cancer activity in mice treated with experimental drug TAK-733

Study reports anti-cancer activity in mice treated with experimental drug TAK-733

A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published online this week in the journal Molecular Cancer Therapeutics reports anti-cancer activity in 10 out of 11 patient tumor samples grown in mice and treated with the experimental drug TAK-733, a small molecule inhibitor of MEK1/2. [More]
Study suggests possible link between body fat and risk of immunotherapy toxicity

Study suggests possible link between body fat and risk of immunotherapy toxicity

Immunotherapy that can be effective against tumors in young, thin mice can be lethal to obese ones, a new study by UC Davis researchers has found. [More]
UC Davis researchers link increased body fat and lethal drug reactions in mice

UC Davis researchers link increased body fat and lethal drug reactions in mice

Immunotherapy that can be effective against tumors in young, thin mice can be lethal to obese ones, a new study by UC Davis researchers has found. The findings, published online today in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggest a possible link between body fat and the risk of toxicity from some types of immunotherapy. [More]
Study on papillary thyroid carcinoma to be presented at 84th Annual Meeting of the ATA

Study on papillary thyroid carcinoma to be presented at 84th Annual Meeting of the ATA

The prevalence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), the most common type of thyroid cancer, is increasing rapidly. New research to determine the impact of radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy on survival in PTC, describing a novel blood test able to detect circulating BRAFV600E-positive tumor DNA, and identifying a long non-coding RNA specifically associated with the thyroid that is down-regulated in PTC compared to normal thyroid tissue in patient-derived clinical specimens and cell cultures will be featured in oral presentations delivered at the 84th Annual Meeting of the American Thyroid Association, October 29-November 2, 2014, in Coronado, California. [More]
Researchers reveal how particular melanoma cells help tumors resist drugs

Researchers reveal how particular melanoma cells help tumors resist drugs

UNC School of Medicine researchers have pinpointed a set of intriguing characteristics in a previously unknown subpopulation of melanoma cancer cells in blood vessels of tumors. These cells, which mimic non-cancerous endothelial cells that normally populate blood vessels in tumors, could provide researchers with another target for cancer therapies. [More]
Janssen announces submission of IMBRUVICA sNDA to FDA for WM treatment

Janssen announces submission of IMBRUVICA sNDA to FDA for WM treatment

Janssen Research & Development, LLC today announced the submission of a supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) for IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration by its strategic partner Pharmacyclics, Inc. [More]
Ebola outbreak emphasizes the importance of monitoring disease burden in developing countries

Ebola outbreak emphasizes the importance of monitoring disease burden in developing countries

A study recently published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology shows that for Ebola, measles, syphilis and many other conditions with skin manifestations the mortality rates are hundreds of times higher in developing countries than they are in developed countries. [More]
Melanoma cells create own 'green light' signal to spread in the body

Melanoma cells create own 'green light' signal to spread in the body

CANCER RESEARCH UK scientists have discovered that melanoma cells are drawn to follow the 'trail' of a naturally-occurring molecule in the body, which directs this serious type of skin cancer to spread, according to research published today (Tuesday) in PLOS Biology. [More]
New research may help identify individuals at increased risk of pancreatic cancer

New research may help identify individuals at increased risk of pancreatic cancer

New research that provides a better understanding of pancreatic cancer may help identify individuals at increased risk. The findings are published early online in Cancer, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. [More]
Blocking STAT3 in immune system cells increases anti-tumour immunity

Blocking STAT3 in immune system cells increases anti-tumour immunity

The STAT transcription factors are involved in the development of many forms of cancer. STAT3 is frequently activated in tumour cells, so drugs targeting STAT3 could be used in cancer therapy. However, STAT3 is also important in the development of the immune system. Dagmar Gotthardt and colleagues at the Vetmeduni Vienna now show that blocking STAT3 in cells of the immune system actually leads to increased anti-tumour immunity. Anti-STAT3 therapy may thus be highly promising. [More]
RNA molecules in tissue, urine samples can detect prostate cancer

RNA molecules in tissue, urine samples can detect prostate cancer

Researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute have identified a set of RNA molecules that are detectable in tissue samples and urine of prostate cancer patients but not in normal healthy individuals. [More]
GE Healthcare-Glaxo Smith Kline deal to create force in cancer testing

GE Healthcare-Glaxo Smith Kline deal to create force in cancer testing

A recently announced deal between GE Healthcare-subsidiary Clarient and Glaxo Smith Kline will create a force in cancer testing, according to Kalorama Information. The healthcare market research publisher tracks companion products, and says that the two entities will form a multi-purpose, data analytics- and companion diagnostics-driven network of laboratories. Kalorama Information recently released a market study, Companion Diagnostics Market, for companion diagnostics such as the drug-test combinations envisioned in this deal. [More]
NIH announces high-risk, high-reward grants for UCSF researchers

NIH announces high-risk, high-reward grants for UCSF researchers

UC San Francisco researchers received five awards announced this week by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for high-risk, high-reward scientific research projects. Their work will focus on novel approaches for diagnosing and treating diseases ranging from autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases, to cancer, diabetes and neurological disorders. [More]
Cancer Network presents exclusive coverage of ESMO 2014 Congress

Cancer Network presents exclusive coverage of ESMO 2014 Congress

UBM Medica US announces that Cancer Network, a leading online community for oncologists and others who treat cancer and the online home of the journal ONCOLOGY, presents exclusive coverage of the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) 2014 Congress, held September 26–30 in Madrid, Spain. [More]
UCSF researchers receive five NIH awards for high-risk scientific research projects

UCSF researchers receive five NIH awards for high-risk scientific research projects

UC San Francisco researchers received five awards announced this week by the National Institutes of Health for high-risk, high-reward scientific research projects. Their work will focus on novel approaches for diagnosing and treating diseases ranging from autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases, to cancer, diabetes and neurological disorders. [More]
Gigapixel whole-body photographic camera may help doctors spot cancer early, save lives

Gigapixel whole-body photographic camera may help doctors spot cancer early, save lives

Melanoma is the fifth most common cancer type in the United States, and it's also the deadliest form of skin cancer, causing more than 75 percent of skin-cancer deaths. If caught early enough though, it is almost always curable. Now a camera, capable of taking snapshots of the entire human body and rendering high-resolution images of a patient's skin may help doctors spot cancer early and save lives. [More]