Melanoma News and Research RSS Feed - Melanoma News and Research

Melanoma is a form of cancer that begins in melanocytes (cells that make the pigment melanin). It may begin in a mole (skin melanoma), but can also begin in other pigmented tissues, such as in the eye or in the intestines.
Pre-clinical studies confirm TRXE-009 as new potential treatment for melanoma

Pre-clinical studies confirm TRXE-009 as new potential treatment for melanoma

Novogen Limited, Australian/US biotechnology company, today announces that it has confirmed that its lead candidate product, TRXE-009, originally developed for the treatment of brain cancers, has been shown in pre-clinical studies also to be highly active against melanoma. [More]
Penn study has implications for developing new cell-based treatments for skin disease

Penn study has implications for developing new cell-based treatments for skin disease

As the main component of connective tissue in the body, fibroblasts are the most common type of cell. Taking advantage of that ready availability, scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, the Wistar Institute, Boston University School of Medicine, and New Jersey Institute of Technology have discovered a way to repurpose fibroblasts into functional melanocytes, the body's pigment-producing cells. [More]
Andor's Komet software used to automatically score modified 3D 'Comet' assay results

Andor's Komet software used to automatically score modified 3D 'Comet' assay results

With cancer rates rising worldwide, and Cancer Research UK predicting that the lifetime risk of cancer will reach 50% by 2027, the need for early diagnosis is overwhelming. Now, a British research group has published details of a simple empirical test to detect any early-stage cancer, relying on Andor's Komet software to automatically score the modified 3D 'Comet' assay results. [More]
New technique allows rapid, large-scale studies of gene function

New technique allows rapid, large-scale studies of gene function

Using a gene-editing system originally developed to delete specific genes, MIT researchers have now shown that they can reliably turn on any gene of their choosing in living cells. [More]
Myriad Genetics highlights three new studies at SABCS 2014

Myriad Genetics highlights three new studies at SABCS 2014

Myriad Genetics, Inc. today announced results from a new study that demonstrated the ability of the myRisk Hereditary Cancer test to detect 105 percent more mutations in cancer causing genes than conventional BRCA testing alone. The Company also presented two key studies in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) that show the myChoice HRD test accurately predicted response to platinum-based therapy in patients with early-stage TNBC and that the BRACAnalysis molecular diagnostic test significantly predicted response to platinum-based drugs in patients with metastatic TNBC. [More]
Heat-shock protein 90 enables ER+ breast cancers to develop resistance to hormonal therapy

Heat-shock protein 90 enables ER+ breast cancers to develop resistance to hormonal therapy

Long known for its ability to help organisms successfully adapt to environmentally stressful conditions, the highly conserved molecular chaperone heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) also enables estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancers to develop resistance to hormonal therapy. [More]
UT Southwestern biophysicist named recipient of 2015 Edith and Peter O'Donnell Award in Science

UT Southwestern biophysicist named recipient of 2015 Edith and Peter O'Donnell Award in Science

The Academy of Medicine, Engineering and Science of Texas has selected Dr. Yuh Min Chook, Professor of Pharmacology and of Biophysics at UT Southwestern Medical Center, as the recipient of the 2015 Edith and Peter O'Donnell Award in Science. [More]
Can-Fite to commence pre-clinical development program of CF602 drug for sexual dysfunction

Can-Fite to commence pre-clinical development program of CF602 drug for sexual dysfunction

Can-Fite BioPharma Ltd., a biotechnology company with a pipeline of proprietary small molecule drugs that address inflammatory and cancer diseases, today reported that it will initiate a pre-clinical development program of its next generation drug CF602 for the indication of sexual dysfunction. Upon successful completion, the company intends to file an IND with the FDA to allow human Phase I studies. [More]
IMBRUVICA-rituximab combination well tolerated in patients with relapsed or refractory MCL

IMBRUVICA-rituximab combination well tolerated in patients with relapsed or refractory MCL

New IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) Phase II data announced by Pharmacyclics, Inc. today demonstrates its potential utility as a combination therapy when used with rituximab. Data suggest that the overall efficacy and safety profile of IMBRUVICA is well tolerated when combined with rituximab in patients with relapsed or refractory mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). [More]
Phase 2 RESONATE-17 study: IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) improves survival in CLL patients with del 17p

Phase 2 RESONATE-17 study: IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) improves survival in CLL patients with del 17p

Results from the Phase 2 RESONATE-17 (PCYC-1117) study show IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) was associated with an 82.6 percent investigator-assessed overall response rate (ORR; the primary endpoint) and a 79 percent progression-free survival (PFS) rate at 12 months in people living with relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) or small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL) who have a genetic mutation known as deletion 17p (del 17p). [More]
Baylor-led researchers identify gene linked to familial glioma

Baylor-led researchers identify gene linked to familial glioma

An international consortium of researchers led by Baylor College of Medicine has identified for the first time a gene associated with familial glioma (brain tumors that appear in two or more members of the same family) providing new support that certain people may be genetically predisposed to the disease. [More]
Nivolumab drug highly effective for Hodgkin's lymphoma

Nivolumab drug highly effective for Hodgkin's lymphoma

A phase I clinical trial of nivolumab found that the immune-boosting drug is a highly effective therapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma. The multi-institution study, led by Mayo Clinic, indicated that the drug was safe and led to an 87 percent response rate in patients who had failed on other treatments. [More]
Novel treatments show promising results in patients with different hematologic disorders

Novel treatments show promising results in patients with different hematologic disorders

In recent years, a number of scientific breakthroughs have led to the development of drugs that unleash the power of the immune system to recognize and attack cancer. Studies presented today at the 56th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology highlight the enormous potential these novel treatments have for patients with a variety of hematologic disorders. [More]
IMBRUVICA demonstrates anti-tumor activity against multiple myeloma in Phase II study

IMBRUVICA demonstrates anti-tumor activity against multiple myeloma in Phase II study

New IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) Phase II data announced here today by Pharmacyclics, Inc) during the 56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting suggests that IMBRUVICA demonstrates anti-tumor activity both as a single-agent and as combination therapy in heavily pre-treated patients with relapsed or relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (MM). [More]
Novel treatments show safe responses in patients with relapsed, treatment-resistant blood cancers

Novel treatments show safe responses in patients with relapsed, treatment-resistant blood cancers

Novel treatments that harness the body's own immune cells to attack cancer cells demonstrate safe and durable responses in patients with relapsed and treatment-resistant blood cancers, according to data presented today at the 56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition. [More]
Oncologists examine efficacy of rose bengal against cancer

Oncologists examine efficacy of rose bengal against cancer

Rose Bengal has been around for decades starting as a way to dye wool. Originally used in medicine as a stain for ophthalmologists, it has a solid safety record going back to the 1930s. Recently, oncologists have examined its efficacy against cancer, specifically melanoma. [More]
Experimental drug works best when patients' immune cells surrounding tumors express PD-L1

Experimental drug works best when patients' immune cells surrounding tumors express PD-L1

A promising experimental immunotherapy drug works best in patients whose immune defenses initially rally to attack the cancer but then are stymied by a molecular brake that shuts down the response, according to a new study led by researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Yale University School of Medicine. [More]
Immune-suppressing protein may predict how patients respond to treatment

Immune-suppressing protein may predict how patients respond to treatment

The presence of an immune-suppressing protein in non-cancerous immune cells may predict how patients with different types of cancer respond to treatment, a multi-center phase I study using an investigational immune therapy drug has found. [More]
Cimetidine drug could be one of many common over-the-counter medicines to treat cancer

Cimetidine drug could be one of many common over-the-counter medicines to treat cancer

A popular indigestion medication can increase survival in colorectal cancer, according to research published in ecancermedicalscience. But in fact, scientists have studied this for years - and a group of cancer advocates want to know why this research isn't more widely used. [More]
Researchers find unusual role of lactate in metabolism of alveolar soft part sarcoma

Researchers find unusual role of lactate in metabolism of alveolar soft part sarcoma

Researchers from Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah discovered the unusual role of lactate in the metabolism of alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS), a rare, aggressive cancer that primarily affects adolescents and young adults. The study also confirmed that a fusion gene is the cancer-causing agent in this disease. [More]