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The nervous system is an organ system containing a network of specialized cells called neurons that coordinate the actions of an animal and transmit signals between different parts of its body. In most animals the nervous system consists of two parts, central and peripheral. The central nervous system contains the brain and spinal cord.
The future of simulated teaching methods: an interview with Dr Robert Amyot

The future of simulated teaching methods: an interview with Dr Robert Amyot

In healthcare, we have physicians, nurses and paramedics who know the textbook by heart and know exactly what they need to do, but have never experienced the procedure first-hand, or they have no experience responding to adverse events that may occur. [More]
Could artificial intelligence help to combat stress? An interview with Davide Morelli

Could artificial intelligence help to combat stress? An interview with Davide Morelli

Stress is actually a bit of a buzzword. The initial definition was “the reaction to changes”, which is why you get stressed also when good things happen, hence the distinction between good stress, eustress, and bad stress, distress. [More]
Two simple measures can help decrease incidence of POCD in older patients

Two simple measures can help decrease incidence of POCD in older patients

Post-operative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), a condition mostly observed in older patients following surgery under general anesthesia, is characterized by impaired memory and concentration. The impairment may be temporary or permanent and incapacitating. [More]
New optogenetic manipulation technique could possibly reduce migraine headaches

New optogenetic manipulation technique could possibly reduce migraine headaches

Despite decades of research, migraines are often not well controlled with medication. For those prone to this type of debilitating headache, it sometimes seems nothing can stop the pain and the sensitivity to light. But what if light itself was key to their relief? [More]
Study shows many people may have potential to develop Huntington's disease

Study shows many people may have potential to develop Huntington's disease

More people may have the potential to develop Huntington's disease than previously thought, according to a study published in the June 22, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Study to evaluate magnitude of health risks caused by Zika virus in pregnant women, infants

Study to evaluate magnitude of health risks caused by Zika virus in pregnant women, infants

The National Institutes of Health and Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz-Fiocruz, a national scientific research organization linked to the Brazilian Ministry of Health, have begun a multi-country study to evaluate the magnitude of health risks that Zika virus infection poses to pregnant women and their developing fetuses and infants. [More]
Switch to rituximab shows anti-inflammatory effect in relapsing-remitting MS

Switch to rituximab shows anti-inflammatory effect in relapsing-remitting MS

Rituximab may be an attractive treatment option for patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, suggest phase II study findings showing its efficacy in controlling inflammatory activity. [More]
Drexel University researchers aim to identify new molecular mechanisms involved in chronic pain

Drexel University researchers aim to identify new molecular mechanisms involved in chronic pain

Chronic pain is one of the most prevalent, disabling and expensive public health crises in the United States. It affects more than 100 million Americans, with annual costs estimated at $635 billion, says a 2014 report from the American Pain Society. [More]
NYU Tandon students use smartphones to improve stroke rehabilitation

NYU Tandon students use smartphones to improve stroke rehabilitation

A team of students from the NYU Tandon School of Engineering is using smartphones to improve the arduous and repetitive process patients must typically undergo to relearn the basic skills they lose after suffering a stroke. [More]
Long-term opioid therapy may not be effective to manage pain in sickle cell disease patients

Long-term opioid therapy may not be effective to manage pain in sickle cell disease patients

In a small study looking at pain assessments in adults with sickle cell disease, researchers at Johns Hopkins says overall, those treated long-term with opioids often fared worse in measures of pain, fatigue and curtailed daily activities than those not on long-term opioids. [More]
TUM scientists identify four new risk genes altered in MS patients

TUM scientists identify four new risk genes altered in MS patients

Scientists of the Technical University of Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry have identified four new risk genes that are altered in German patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
Brain imaging finds link between blood-brain barrier disruption and severity of bleeding after stroke therapy

Brain imaging finds link between blood-brain barrier disruption and severity of bleeding after stroke therapy

In a study of stroke patients, investigators confirmed through MRI brain scans that there was an association between the extent of disruption to the brain's protective blood-brain barrier and the severity of bleeding following invasive stroke therapy. The results of the National Institutes of Health-funded study were published in Neurology. [More]
Cells grown from pluripotent stem cells can pair with heart muscle cells to stimulate contractions

Cells grown from pluripotent stem cells can pair with heart muscle cells to stimulate contractions

Researchers at Johns Hopkins report that a type of lab-grown human nerve cells can partner with heart muscle cells to stimulate contractions. [More]
Epilepsy in immediate family member may increase person’s chances of being diagnosed with autism

Epilepsy in immediate family member may increase person’s chances of being diagnosed with autism

Having a first-degree relative with epilepsy may increase a person's risk of being diagnosed with autism, according to a study published in the June 15, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
S1P1R variation may cause differential patient responses to fingolimod treatment

S1P1R variation may cause differential patient responses to fingolimod treatment

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disorder that results in demyelination of neurons. The FDA-approved drug fingolimod (Gilenya, FTY-720) modulates signaling by the bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), which is linked to MS pathogenesis. [More]
Complex 36-point therapeutic personalized program can help reverse memory loss in early AD patients

Complex 36-point therapeutic personalized program can help reverse memory loss in early AD patients

Results from quantitative MRI and neuropsychological testing show unprecedented improvements in ten patients with early Alzheimer's disease (AD) or its precursors following treatment with a programmatic and personalized therapy. Results from an approach dubbed metabolic enhancement for neurodegeneration are now available online in the journal Aging. [More]
New UCLA study reveals strategy to fight against pesticide-associated Parkinson’s disease

New UCLA study reveals strategy to fight against pesticide-associated Parkinson’s disease

Exposure to a group of common pesticides, called dithiocarbamates, has long been associated with an increased risk of Parkinson's disease, although the mechanism by which the compounds exert their toxicity on the brain has not been completely understood. [More]
Research highlights significance of ultra-rapid brain responses to threat-related visual stimuli

Research highlights significance of ultra-rapid brain responses to threat-related visual stimuli

An international team lead by researchers from CTB-UPM shows that the amygdala in the human brain is able to detect possible threats in the visual environment at ultra-fast time scales. [More]
Autonomic nervous system plays role in promoting memory consolidation during sleep

Autonomic nervous system plays role in promoting memory consolidation during sleep

A team of sleep researchers at the University of California, Riverside, led by psychology professor Sara C. Mednick, has found that the autonomic nervous system, which is responsible for control of bodily functions not consciously directed (such as breathing, heartbeat, and digestive processes) plays a role in promoting memory consolidation - the process of converting information from short-term to long-term memory - during sleep. [More]
Excessive AhR signaling helps explain dioxin-induced abnormal behavioral alterations in mice

Excessive AhR signaling helps explain dioxin-induced abnormal behavioral alterations in mice

Dioxins are environmental pollutants that stay in the body for long periods of time because they can accumulate in fat tissue. They are mainly by-products of combustion and industrial processes. [More]
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