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The nervous system is an organ system containing a network of specialized cells called neurons that coordinate the actions of an animal and transmit signals between different parts of its body. In most animals the nervous system consists of two parts, central and peripheral. The central nervous system contains the brain and spinal cord.
Understanding how neurons work

Understanding how neurons work

Before scientists can unlock the secrets of the human brain, they must fully understand neurons—the cells of our brain, spinal cord and overall nervous system. Thousands of detailed neuron images, from different organisms, currently sit in individual data collections across the globe, comprising several petabytes of data altogether. [More]
Neurocrine Biosciences, Mitsubishi Tanabe to develop and commercialize NBI-98854 in select Asian markets

Neurocrine Biosciences, Mitsubishi Tanabe to develop and commercialize NBI-98854 in select Asian markets

Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc. today announced that it has entered into an exclusive collaboration and licensing agreement for the development and commercialization of its VMAT2 inhibitor, NBI-98854, in Japan and other select Asian markets with Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma Corporation. [More]
MOVANTIK (naloxegol) now available in U.S. for treatment of OIC in adult patients with non-cancer pain

MOVANTIK (naloxegol) now available in U.S. for treatment of OIC in adult patients with non-cancer pain

Nektar Therapeutics reported that partner AstraZeneca announced today that MOVANTIK (naloxegol) has launched in the United States. On September 16, 2014, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved MOVANTIK as the first once-daily oral peripherally-acting mu-opioid receptor antagonist (PAMORA) medication for the treatment of opioid-induced constipation (OIC) in adult patients with chronic, non-cancer pain. [More]
Ultrafine particle exposure may affect cardiac function

Ultrafine particle exposure may affect cardiac function

The adverse health effects caused by fine particles have been known for some time. In addition, ultrafine particles appear to play a significant role in cardiac function - even if an individual is exposed to these for only a few minutes, as scientists of Helmholtz Zentrum München have now been able to show. [More]
Study provides insights into basis for cognitive dysfunction

Study provides insights into basis for cognitive dysfunction

Scientists at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health have identified a unique pattern of immune molecules in the cerebrospinal fluid of people with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) that provides insights into the basis for cognitive dysfunction--frequently described by patients as "brain fog"--as well as new hope for improvements in diagnosis and treatment. [More]
Hormone that stimulates milk production in nursing mothers also fosters bond between parents

Hormone that stimulates milk production in nursing mothers also fosters bond between parents

Research has discovered a role for prolactin, the hormone that stimulates milk production in nursing mothers, in the bond between parents. [More]
ElectroCore selected as finalist in ‘Technology’ category at FT ArcelorMittal Boldness in Business awards

ElectroCore selected as finalist in ‘Technology’ category at FT ArcelorMittal Boldness in Business awards

At the annual FT ArcelorMittal Boldness in Business awards held in London last week electroCore was one of six finalists in the ‘Technology’ category, in a competition that included over 250 companies, which Open Garden won for its FireChat digital app. [More]
CNIO researchers describe presence of MDH2 gene mutations in hereditary neuroendocrine tumors

CNIO researchers describe presence of MDH2 gene mutations in hereditary neuroendocrine tumors

Researchers in the Hereditary Endocrine Cancer Group of the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre -- led by Alberto Cascón and Mercedes Robledo -- have described the presence of mutations in the MDH2 gene, in a family with very rare neuroendocrine tumours associated with a high hereditary component: pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas that affect the suprarenal and parathyroid glands (groups of chromaffin cells in the central nervous system), respectively. [More]
Can-Fite BioPharma's CF101Phase II/III psoriasis trial fails to meet primary endpoint

Can-Fite BioPharma's CF101Phase II/III psoriasis trial fails to meet primary endpoint

Can-Fite BioPharma Ltd., a biotechnology company with a pipeline of proprietary small molecule drugs that address inflammatory and cancer diseases, announced today that its Phase II/III psoriasis trial for the Company's drug candidate CF101 did not achieve its primary endpoint. [More]
Brown fat tissue communicates with the brain through sensory nerves

Brown fat tissue communicates with the brain through sensory nerves

Brown fat tissue, the body's "good fat," communicates with the brain through sensory nerves, possibly sharing information that is important for fighting human obesity, such as how much fat we have and how much fat we've lost, according to researchers at Georgia State University. [More]
Study: Blood test may help diagnose Fragile X syndrome related disorders in women

Study: Blood test may help diagnose Fragile X syndrome related disorders in women

A blood test may shed new light on Fragile X syndrome related disorders in women, according to a new study published in the March 25, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Fragile X is the most common inherited form of intellectual disability and the most frequent genetic cause of autism. [More]
Study: Blood test can help identify bowel cancer patients who may benefit from chemotherapy

Study: Blood test can help identify bowel cancer patients who may benefit from chemotherapy

Manchester researchers have provided early evidence to suggest that a blood test could be used to identify bowel cancer patients that may benefit from more intensive chemotherapy. [More]
Egalet announces plans to commercialize SPRIX Nasal Spray and OXAYDO tablets

Egalet announces plans to commercialize SPRIX Nasal Spray and OXAYDO tablets

Egalet Corporation, a fully integrated specialty pharmaceutical company focused on developing, manufacturing and marketing innovative pain treatments, today announced its plans for the commercialization of SPRIX (ketorolac tromethamine) Nasal Spray and OXAYDO (oxycodone HCI, USP) tablets for oral use only –CII. [More]
Mesenchymal stem cell transplantation reduces opioid tolerance, opioid-induced pain

Mesenchymal stem cell transplantation reduces opioid tolerance, opioid-induced pain

Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation reduced opioid tolerance and opioid-induced hyperalgesia caused by daily morphine injections in rats, according to new research. [More]
Experimental drug that attacks brain tumor cells passes early tests

Experimental drug that attacks brain tumor cells passes early tests

An experimental drug that attacks brain tumor tissue by crippling the cells' energy source called the mitochondria has passed early tests in animal models and human tissue cultures, say Houston Methodist scientists. [More]
TPU's submission of Docetaxel Injection Concentrate, Non-Alcohol Formula NDA acknowledged by FDA

TPU's submission of Docetaxel Injection Concentrate, Non-Alcohol Formula NDA acknowledged by FDA

Teikoku Pharma USA announced today that it has submitted a 505(b)(2) New Drug Application (NDA) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for Docetaxel Injection Concentrate, Non-Alcohol Formula on February 26, 2015 and received an acknowledgment of the receipt from FDA. [More]
Funding helps researchers to kiss MS goodbye

Funding helps researchers to kiss MS goodbye

Murdoch University researchers have received funding to investigate the link between the Epstein-Barr virus infection, more commonly known as glandular fever or the ‘kissing disease’, and the debilitating disease Multiple Sclerosis (MS). [More]
Newly identified proteins could shed light on the mechanisms of ALS

Newly identified proteins could shed light on the mechanisms of ALS

Where ALS comes from and how it progresses are mysteries that continue to vex medical science. But recent research at Sweden's KTH Royal Institute of Technology has found three proteins that could shed some light on the mechanisms behind this deadly disease. [More]
Harmful effects of smoking may be reflected in the facial movements of unborn babies

Harmful effects of smoking may be reflected in the facial movements of unborn babies

The harmful effects of smoking during pregnancy may be reflected in the facial movements of mothers' unborn babies, new research has suggested. [More]
Deuterium-containing sigma-1 agonist demonstrates anti-seizure, anti-inflammatory effects in TBI model

Deuterium-containing sigma-1 agonist demonstrates anti-seizure, anti-inflammatory effects in TBI model

Research results published in the Journal of Neurotrauma and conducted by the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) as part of a collaboration with Concert Pharmaceuticals, Inc. showed that a novel deuterium-containing sigma-1 agonist invented at Concert, called C-10068, demonstrated anti-seizure and anti-inflammatory effects in a preclinical model of traumatic brain injury (TBI). [More]
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