Nervous System News and Research RSS Feed - Nervous System News and Research

The nervous system is an organ system containing a network of specialized cells called neurons that coordinate the actions of an animal and transmit signals between different parts of its body. In most animals the nervous system consists of two parts, central and peripheral. The central nervous system contains the brain and spinal cord.
Rhenovia Pharma's SMARTT e-Patch project wins award at the French ‘World Innovation Challenge'

Rhenovia Pharma's SMARTT e-Patch project wins award at the French ‘World Innovation Challenge'

Rhenovia Pharma, a biotechnology company specialized in the application of biosimulation to the research and development of new medicinal products, today announces that its SMARTT e-Patch project has won an award at the ‘World Innovation Challenge’; founded by the President of France to identify future champions in the French economy. [More]
New studies may offer hope for people with migraine

New studies may offer hope for people with migraine

Two new studies may offer hope for people with migraine. The two studies released today will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, April 26 to May 3, 2014. [More]
NBTY introduces Nature's Origin, a complete line of nutritional supplements

NBTY introduces Nature's Origin, a complete line of nutritional supplements

NBTY, Inc., a leading global manufacturer and distributor of high-quality vitamins and nutritional supplements, introduces Nature's Origin, its first complete line of vitamins, minerals and herbal supplements that are free from ingredients made with GMOs, preservatives, gluten and irradiation. [More]

Scientists uncover key mechanism that regulates nerve cell growth in damaged nervous system

New research published today out of the University of Calgary's Hotchkiss Brain Institute uncovers a mechanism to promote growth in damaged nerve cells as a means to restore connections after injury. Dr. Doug Zochodne and his team have discovered a key molecule that directly regulates nerve cell growth in the damaged nervous system. [More]
Narrowing of carotid artery in neck without any symptoms may be linked to memory problems

Narrowing of carotid artery in neck without any symptoms may be linked to memory problems

For the first time, researchers have demonstrated that narrowing of the carotid artery in the neck without any symptoms may be linked to problems in learning, memory, thinking and decision-making, compared to people with similar risk factors but no narrowing in the neck artery, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, April 26 to May 3, 2014. [More]

Synageva announces publication of LAL Deficiency review in Atherosclerosis

Synageva BioPharma Corp., a biopharmaceutical company developing therapeutic products for rare diseases, today announced the publication of an overview of lysosomal acid lipase deficiency (LAL Deficiency) in the online version and an upcoming print edition of Atherosclerosis, the official journal of the European Atherosclerosis Society. [More]
Scientists lay groundwork for understanding immune responses in Lyme disease patients

Scientists lay groundwork for understanding immune responses in Lyme disease patients

A team of scientists led by Johns Hopkins and Stanford University researchers has laid the groundwork for understanding how variations in immune responses to Lyme disease can contribute to the many different outcomes of this bacterial infection seen in individual patients. A report on the work appears online April 16 in PLOS One. [More]
New insights into possible common links between neurodegenerative diseases

New insights into possible common links between neurodegenerative diseases

The pattern of brain alterations may be similar in several different neurodegenerative diseases, which opens the door to alternative therapeutic strategies to tackle these diseases [More]
Researchers identify key genes linked to pain perception

Researchers identify key genes linked to pain perception

Researchers may have identified key genes linked to why some people have a higher tolerance for pain than others, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, April 26 to May 3, 2014. [More]
Researchers devise new approach to treatment of Alzheimer's disease

Researchers devise new approach to treatment of Alzheimer's disease

A team of researchers from Columbia University Medical Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, and Brandeis University has devised a wholly new approach to the treatment of Alzheimer's disease involving the so-called retromer protein complex. Retromer plays a vital role in neurons, steering amyloid precursor protein (APP) away from a region of the cell where APP is cleaved, creating the potentially toxic byproduct amyloid-beta, which is thought to contribute to the development of Alzheimer's. [More]
Harvard neuroscientists present new view of myelin

Harvard neuroscientists present new view of myelin

Harvard neuroscientists have made a discovery that turns 160 years of neuroanatomy on its head. [More]
U.Va. researchers named recipients of 2013 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards

U.Va. researchers named recipients of 2013 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards

University of Virginia neurologist Dr. Erin Pennock Foff, biologist Sarah Kucenas and biomedical engineer Shayn Peirce-Cotter have been named recipients of 2013 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards to benefit children of the United States. Each scientist will receive $100,000 in direct annual research support from The Hartwell Foundation for three years. [More]

Research by UCI, Salk Institute points to novel therapies for minimizing stroke-induced brain damage

​By discovering a new mechanism that allows blood to enter the brain immediately after a stroke, researchers at UC Irvine and the Salk Institute have opened the door to new therapies that may limit or prevent stroke-induced brain damage. [More]
FTC requests additional information relating to Actavis’ pending acquisition of Forest Laboratories

FTC requests additional information relating to Actavis’ pending acquisition of Forest Laboratories

Actavis plc and Forest Laboratories, Inc. today announced that they have each received a request for additional information from the Federal Trade Commission ("FTC") in connection with Actavis' pending acquisition of Forest. [More]
Researchers develop class of drugs to lessen impact of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's

Researchers develop class of drugs to lessen impact of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's

​A class of drugs developed to treat immune-related conditions and cancer - including one currently in clinical trials for glioblastoma and other tumors - eliminates neural inflammation associated with dementia-linked diseases and brain injuries, according to UC Irvine researchers. [More]
Study indicates that changes in appetite and taste are very common after gastric bypass surgery

Study indicates that changes in appetite and taste are very common after gastric bypass surgery

Changes in appetite, taste and smell are par for the course for people who have undergone Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery during which one's stomach is made smaller and small intestines shortened. [More]
Apathy signals brain shrinkage in old people

Apathy signals brain shrinkage in old people

Launer's team used brain volume as a measure of accelerated brain aging. Brain volume losses occur during normal aging, but in this study, larger amounts of brain volume loss could indicate brain diseases. [More]
New mouse study indicates that mutant protein in muscle cells is responsible for SBMA

New mouse study indicates that mutant protein in muscle cells is responsible for SBMA

Sometimes known as Kennedy's disease, spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a rare inherited neuromuscular disorder characterized by slowly progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. [More]
Researchers develop novel tools to learn how astrocytes listen in on neuronal communication

Researchers develop novel tools to learn how astrocytes listen in on neuronal communication

​Everything we do - all of our movements, thoughts and feelings - are the result of neurons talking with one another, and recent studies have suggested that some of the conversations might not be all that private. [More]

Study sheds light on factors that lead to development of rare condition affecting inner ear

A new study has shed light on the factors likely to lead to the development of a rare condition affecting the inner ear. [More]