Nervous System News and Research RSS Feed - Nervous System News and Research

The nervous system is an organ system containing a network of specialized cells called neurons that coordinate the actions of an animal and transmit signals between different parts of its body. In most animals the nervous system consists of two parts, central and peripheral. The central nervous system contains the brain and spinal cord.
Brain-derived neurotrophic factor linked to slower cognitive decline in older people

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor linked to slower cognitive decline in older people

Older people with higher amounts of a key protein in their brains also had slower decline in their memory and thinking abilities than people with lower amounts of protein from the gene called brain-derived neurotrophic factor, or BDNF, according to a study published in the January 27, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Study leads to FDA approval of first immunotherapy for treatment of neuroblastoma

Study leads to FDA approval of first immunotherapy for treatment of neuroblastoma

Building upon more than two decades of basic research conducted at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Araz Marachelian, MD, of CHLA, and her colleagues at pediatric academic centers across the U. S., have shown that an immunotherapy that until now has only been available to patients enrolled in research studies, is equivalent to the product that has been manufactured for commercial use and can be made available to all patients. [More]
Neurocutaneous disorders affect skin, nervous system

Neurocutaneous disorders affect skin, nervous system

One of the most common genetic disorders is a condition called neurofibromatosis, which causes brown spots on the skin and benign tumors on the brain, spinal cord and other parts of the nervous system. [More]
Positive bosutinib response for elderly blast phase CML patient

Positive bosutinib response for elderly blast phase CML patient

A case study suggests that the third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor bosutinib may be considered as induction therapy for blast phase chronic myeloid leukaemia in older patients. [More]
FDA approves Allergan's sNDA to update label for DALVANCE (dalbavancin) for injection

FDA approves Allergan's sNDA to update label for DALVANCE (dalbavancin) for injection

Allergan plc, a leading global pharmaceutical company, today announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the company's supplemental new drug application (sNDA) to update the label for DALVANCE (dalbavancin) for injection. [More]
Lilly receives FDA approval for Humulin R U-500 KwikPen

Lilly receives FDA approval for Humulin R U-500 KwikPen

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Eli Lilly and Company's Humulin R U-500 KwikPen(insulin human injection) 500 units/mL, a pre-filled device containing Humulin R U-500, a highly concentrated formulation of insulin. [More]
Allergan announces publication of VIBERZI Phase III trial results in The New England Journal of Medicine

Allergan announces publication of VIBERZI Phase III trial results in The New England Journal of Medicine

Allergan plc announced today the publication of the positive results of the Phase III trials of VIBERZITM C IV (eluxadoline) for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D) in the January 21 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Study shows African-Americans may not be at higher risk for second stroke

Study shows African-Americans may not be at higher risk for second stroke

Even though young African-Americans are at three times greater risk of a first stroke than their white counterparts, they may not be at a higher risk for a second stroke, according to a study published in the January 20, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study is one of the first of its kind to look at race and second stroke risk. [More]
Gene therapy holds considerable potential for safe, effective treatment of people with factor VII deficiency

Gene therapy holds considerable potential for safe, effective treatment of people with factor VII deficiency

Hematology researchers have used a single injection of gene therapy to correct a rare bleeding disorder, factor VII deficiency, in dogs. This success in large animals holds considerable potential for a safe, effective and long-lasting new treatment in humans with the same bleeding disorder. [More]
Upsher-Smith, Saniona sign drug discovery and development agreement

Upsher-Smith, Saniona sign drug discovery and development agreement

Upsher-Smith Laboratories, Inc., through its wholly-owned subsidiary Proximagen Ltd., and Saniona, a leading biotech company in the field of ion channels, today announce that they have entered into a drug discovery and development collaboration. [More]
New study shows 92% of measured restaurant meals exceed calorie requirements

New study shows 92% of measured restaurant meals exceed calorie requirements

Meals consumed at fast-food restaurants are often seen as one of the biggest contributors to the obesity epidemic. But according to a new study in the Journal of the American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 92 percent of 364 measured restaurant meals from both large-chain and non-chain (local) restaurants exceeded recommended calorie requirements for a single meal. [More]
New study sheds light on possible role of ion channel in the immune system

New study sheds light on possible role of ion channel in the immune system

Many cells have microscopic gates, called ion channels, which open to allow the flow of ions across the cell membrane. Thanks to these gates, cells can detect stimuli such as heat, pain, pressure and even spicy food. [More]
Physiotherapy and occupational therapy not effective in patients with Parkinson's disease

Physiotherapy and occupational therapy not effective in patients with Parkinson's disease

New research from the University of Birmingham has shown that physiotherapy and occupational therapy do not produce improvements in quality of life for patients with mild to moderate Parkinson's disease. [More]
Aerobic exercise training may slow progression of Parkinson's disease

Aerobic exercise training may slow progression of Parkinson's disease

You've likely heard this before: Exercise is good for you. It helps your heart, bones, back and more. But here's one thing you might not have heard: Ongoing aerobic exercise may slow the progression of Parkinson's disease, a progressive disorder of the nervous system. [More]
Rapastinel demonstrates pro-cognitive benefits in animal model of cognitive impairment

Rapastinel demonstrates pro-cognitive benefits in animal model of cognitive impairment

Allergan plc, a leading global pharmaceutical company, announced today that new data on the investigational medication rapastinel (GLYX-13) and its lack of impairment on cognitive function were published in the peer-reviewed journal Behavioural Brain Research. [More]
RIKEN researchers discover how to reverse abnormal axonal development

RIKEN researchers discover how to reverse abnormal axonal development

Researchers at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan have discovered how to reverse the abnormal axonal development characteristic of CFEOM3, a congenital disease that affects the muscles that control eye movements. [More]
CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing technique could be controlled using RNA-based drugs

CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing technique could be controlled using RNA-based drugs

In just the past few years, researchers have found a way to use a naturally occurring bacterial system known as CRISPR/Cas9 to inactivate or correct specific genes in any organism. CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing activity runs continuously, though, leading to risk of additional editing at unwanted sites. [More]
Researchers identify protein structure linked to pain and heat perception

Researchers identify protein structure linked to pain and heat perception

Touch a hot stove, and your fingers will recoil in pain because your skin carries tiny temperature sensors that detect heat and send a message to your brain saying, "Ouch! That's hot! Let go!" [More]
Pulmonary neuroendocrine cells act like sensor to orchestrate immune response

Pulmonary neuroendocrine cells act like sensor to orchestrate immune response

An uncommon and little-studied type of cell in the lungs has been found to act like a sensor, linking the pulmonary and central nervous systems to regulate immune response in reaction to environmental cues. [More]
Regular practice of Transcendental Meditation benefits active-duty service members

Regular practice of Transcendental Meditation benefits active-duty service members

Regular practice of Transcendental Meditation enables some active duty service members battling post-traumatic stress disorder to reduce or even eliminate their psychotropic medication and get better control of their often-debilitating symptoms, researchers report in the journal Military Medicine. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement