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The nervous system is an organ system containing a network of specialized cells called neurons that coordinate the actions of an animal and transmit signals between different parts of its body. In most animals the nervous system consists of two parts, central and peripheral. The central nervous system contains the brain and spinal cord.
Sheffield Hallam University lecturer to discuss research into cause of fibromyalgia at parliamentary event

Sheffield Hallam University lecturer to discuss research into cause of fibromyalgia at parliamentary event

A Sheffield Hallam University lecturer will address the Health Secretary and other MPs tomorrow at a parliamentary event that aims to raise awareness of the incurable chronic pain condition, fibromyalgia. [More]
Implantable brain device shows promising results in animal study

Implantable brain device shows promising results in animal study

An implantable brain device that literally melts away at a pre-determined rate minimizes injury to tissue normally associated with standard electrode implantation, according to research led by a team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Older adults become more sensitive to pain, study shows

Older adults become more sensitive to pain, study shows

When older relatives complain about their pains, show a little empathy, because new research suggests that as we age, we may all become more sensitive to pain. A small, preliminary University of Florida Health study has suggested for the first time that inflammation may occur more quickly and at a higher magnitude -- and stays around longer -- when older adults experience pain versus when younger adults experience pain. [More]
Historical and modern perspectives in management of basilar invagination

Historical and modern perspectives in management of basilar invagination

Winner of the Vesalius Award Award, Abhidha Harshad Shah, MS, MD, presented her research, Management of Basilar Invagination: A Historical Perspective, during the 2016 American Association of Neurological Surgeons Annual Scientific Meeting. [More]
New research shows molecular, cellular processes in human embroyo development

New research shows molecular, cellular processes in human embroyo development

Despite significant biomedical advances in recent decades, the very earliest events of human developmentĀ¬--those that occur during a critical window just after fertilization--have remained an unobservable mystery, until now. [More]
Researchers monitor ICP and PRx to characterize temporal evolution in severe TBI patients

Researchers monitor ICP and PRx to characterize temporal evolution in severe TBI patients

Winner of the Best International Abstract Award, Hadie Adams, presented his research, Characterizing the Temporal Evolution of ICP and Cerebrovascular Reactivity after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury, during the 2016 American Association of Neurological Surgeons Annual Scientific Meeting. [More]
Research provides new insight into cellular composition of IDH1-mutant gliomas

Research provides new insight into cellular composition of IDH1-mutant gliomas

Winner of the Preuss Research Award, Andrew Venteicher, MD, PhD, presented his research, Cellular Architecture of Human IDH1-mutant Gliomas Revealed Using Single-cell RNA Sequencing, during the 2016 American Association of Neurological Surgeons Annual Scientific Meeting. [More]
Study analyzes PI, RI of patients who underwent AVM embolization and surgical resection

Study analyzes PI, RI of patients who underwent AVM embolization and surgical resection

Winner of the Louise Eisenhardt Traveling Scholarship, Sophia F. Shakur, MD, IFAANS, presented her research, Changes in Pulsatility and Resistance Indices of Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformation Feeder Arteries after Embolization and Surgery, during the 2016 American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) Annual Scientific Meeting. [More]
Researchers investigate incidence of new position-related nerve deficit in spine surgery

Researchers investigate incidence of new position-related nerve deficit in spine surgery

Winner of the Sanford J. Larson, MD, PhD, Award, Gurpreet Surinder Gandhoke, MD, presented his research, Incidence of Position Related Neuropraxia in 4,489 Consecutive Patients Undergoing Spine Surgery. Role of SSEP Monitoring? during the 2016 American Association of Neurological Surgeons Annual Scientific Meeting. [More]
Study investigates outcomes in octogenarians undergoing meningioma surgery

Study investigates outcomes in octogenarians undergoing meningioma surgery

Winner of the Integra Foundation Award, Jeremy Steinberger, MD, presented his research, Morbidity and Mortality of Meningioma Resection Increases in Octogenarians, during the 2016 American Association of Neurological Surgeons Annual Scientific Meeting. [More]
Real risk of rebound syndrome following fingolimod cessation for MS

Real risk of rebound syndrome following fingolimod cessation for MS

Rebound syndrome following cessation of fingolimod for multiple sclerosis occurs at a clinically relevant rate, shows research, prompting the need for further study on how best to sequence and discontinue such drugs. [More]
Lumbar drain placement lowers postoperative CSF leak rate for patients undergoing endoscopic endonasal surgery

Lumbar drain placement lowers postoperative CSF leak rate for patients undergoing endoscopic endonasal surgery

Winner of the Synthes Skull Base Award, Nathan T. Zwagerman, MD, presented his research, A Prospective, Randomized Control Trial for Lumbar Drain Placement after Endoscopic Endonasal Skull Base Surgery, during the 2016 American Association of Neurological Surgeons Annual Scientific Meeting. [More]
Influence of psychiatric comorbidities on all-cause readmissions following elective spine surgery

Influence of psychiatric comorbidities on all-cause readmissions following elective spine surgery

Winner of the Robert Florin Resident Award, Owoicho Adogwa, MD, presented his research, Association Between Baseline Affective Disorders and 30-day Readmission Rates in Patients Undergoing Elective Spine Surgery, during the 2016 American Association of Neurological Surgeons Annual Scientific Meeting. [More]
Study opens door for new opportunities in finding antidotes to nerve agent sarin

Study opens door for new opportunities in finding antidotes to nerve agent sarin

The nerve agent sarin causes a deadly overstimulation of the nervous system that can be stopped if treated with an antidote within minutes of poisoning. Today, a ground-breaking study has been published in PNAS, which in detail describes how such a drug works. Researchers at the Swedish Defence Research Agency, Umea University and in Germany are behind the study. [More]
Xiao procedure lacks efficacy for bladder control in children

Xiao procedure lacks efficacy for bladder control in children

Researchers at Johns Hopkins All Children's Hospital report the results of a double-blinded randomized controlled trial of the "Xiao procedure" in children with spina bifida. [More]
Study shows cannabinoid type 2 receptor plays vital role in signal processing of the brain

Study shows cannabinoid type 2 receptor plays vital role in signal processing of the brain

The cannabinoid type 2 receptor - also called "CB2 receptor" - is a special membrane protein. Its function is to receive chemical signals that control cellular activity. "Until now, this receptor was considered part of the immune system without function in nerve cells. [More]
Study examines role of intraventricular transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell in stroke patients

Study examines role of intraventricular transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell in stroke patients

Winner of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons International Travel Scholarship, Asra Al Fauzi, MD, IFAANS, presented his research, Intraventricular Transplantation of Autologous Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell in Hemorrhagic Stroke, during the 2016 AANS Annual Scientific Meeting. [More]
Bioengineers develop synthetic bed to nurture colonies of human embryonic stem cells

Bioengineers develop synthetic bed to nurture colonies of human embryonic stem cells

The most productive way scientists have devised to nurture colonies of human embryonic stem cells is to do so atop a bed of mouse cells. That may be fine for lab research, but it poses an unacceptable contamination risk for stem cells intended for transplant into human patients. In a new study, Brown University bioengineers have developed a synthetic bed that works about as well as the mouse cells, called fibroblasts, without any possibility of contamination. [More]
Social networks may cause stress to children and adolescents

Social networks may cause stress to children and adolescents

Research has shown the significance of social relationships in influencing adult human behavior and health; however, little is known about how children's perception of their social networks correlates with stress and how it may influence development. Now, a University of Missouri research team has determined that children and adolescents physically react to their social networks and the stress those networks may cause. Scientists believe that the quality and size of the social relationships nurtured in childhood may have important physiological consequences for physical and mental health for youth. [More]
New article reviews ability of different stem cells to help restore function after spinal cord injuries

New article reviews ability of different stem cells to help restore function after spinal cord injuries

Stem cell therapy is a rapidly evolving and promising treatment for spinal-cord injuries. According to a new literature review, published in the April issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, different types of stem cells vary in their ability to help restore function, and an ideal treatment protocol remains unclear pending further clinical research. [More]
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