Nervous System News and Research RSS Feed - Nervous System News and Research

The nervous system is an organ system containing a network of specialized cells called neurons that coordinate the actions of an animal and transmit signals between different parts of its body. In most animals the nervous system consists of two parts, central and peripheral. The central nervous system contains the brain and spinal cord.
Parkinson's disease can migrate from gut to brain, shows research

Parkinson's disease can migrate from gut to brain, shows research

Parkinson's disease is strongly linked to the degeneration of the brain's movement center. In the last decade, the question of where the disease begins has led researchers to a different part of the human anatomy. [More]
Study reveals inner workings of PKA switch that regulates cellular functions, contributes to deadly disorders

Study reveals inner workings of PKA switch that regulates cellular functions, contributes to deadly disorders

A University of Utah-led study using X-rays and neutron beams has revealed the inner workings of a master switch that regulates basic cellular functions, but that also, when mutated, contributes to cancer, cardiovascular disease and other deadly disorders. [More]
Gedeon Richter implements MediaSoft's innovative CRM solutions to improve customer-oriented services

Gedeon Richter implements MediaSoft's innovative CRM solutions to improve customer-oriented services

As a specialty pharmaceutical company, Gedeon Richter remains focused on innovating and searching for advanced multichannel approaches through CRM. [More]
Four UCLA researchers receive NIH Director's New Innovator Award

Four UCLA researchers receive NIH Director's New Innovator Award

Four scientists from the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have received a National Institutes of Health Director's New Innovator Award that will forward revolutionary stem cell and neuro-science in medicine. [More]
Isis Pharmaceuticals provides update on Phase 2 clinical studies of ISIS-SMN Rx in children with SMA

Isis Pharmaceuticals provides update on Phase 2 clinical studies of ISIS-SMN Rx in children with SMA

Isis Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today provided an update on its ongoing open-label Phase 2 clinical studies of ISIS-SMN Rx in infants and children with spinal muscular atrophy at the 19th International World Muscle Society (WMS) Congress in Berlin, Germany. [More]
Researchers reveal new information about Protein Kinase A

Researchers reveal new information about Protein Kinase A

Using X-rays and neutron beams, a team of researchers from the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, University of Utah and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have teased out new information about Protein Kinase A (PKA), a ubiquitous master switch that helps regulate fundamental cellular functions like energy consumption and interactions with hormones, neurotransmitters and drugs. [More]
Study suggests that college athletes who play contact sports more likely to carry MRSA

Study suggests that college athletes who play contact sports more likely to carry MRSA

Even if they don't show signs of infection, college athletes who play football, soccer and other contact sports are more likely to carry the superbug methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), suggests a study on MRSA and athletes, which is being presented at IDWeek 2014-. [More]
New findings link obesity and dietary factors to late-life dementias

New findings link obesity and dietary factors to late-life dementias

Difficulties learning, remembering, and concentrating. An inability to resist environmental temptations to eat. A lifetime of progressive deterioration in the brain. [More]
NanoBio to highlight prophylactic NE HSV-2 vaccine candidate at The Keystone Symposia Conference

NanoBio to highlight prophylactic NE HSV-2 vaccine candidate at The Keystone Symposia Conference

NanoBio Corporation today announced that the company will present data at The Keystone Symposia Conference, The Modes of Action of Vaccine Adjuvants, in Seattle on October 12, 2014. [More]

Impax executes definitive agreement to acquire Tower Holdings, Lineage Therapeutics

Impax Laboratories, Inc. today announced the execution of a definitive agreement under which Impax will acquire Tower Holdings, Inc., including operating subsidiaries CorePharma LLC and Amedra Pharmaceuticals LLC, and Lineage Therapeutics Inc. (together, the "Companies") for $700 million in cash, subject to certain customary purchase price adjustments. [More]
Stretch sensors respond weakly to muscle stretch caused by external forces

Stretch sensors respond weakly to muscle stretch caused by external forces

Stretch sensors in our muscles participate in reflexes that serve the subconscious control of posture and movement. According to a new study published in the Journal of Neuroscience, these sensors respond weakly to muscle stretch caused by one's voluntary action, and most strongly to stretch that is imposed by external forces. The ability to reflect causality in this manner can facilitate appropriate reflex control and accurate self-perception. [More]
Women with healthy diet and lifestyle less likely to have stroke

Women with healthy diet and lifestyle less likely to have stroke

Women with a healthy diet and lifestyle may be less likely to have a stroke by more than half, according to a study published in the October 8, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
MicroRNA molecule plays crucial role in managing cell survival and growth

MicroRNA molecule plays crucial role in managing cell survival and growth

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a microRNA molecule as a surprisingly crucial player in managing cell survival and growth. [More]
Researchers develop potential fast-acting "vaccine" for myasthenia gravis

Researchers develop potential fast-acting "vaccine" for myasthenia gravis

Nearly 60,000 Americans suffer from myasthenia gravis (MG), a non-inherited autoimmune form of muscle weakness. The disease has no cure, and the primary treatments are nonspecific immunosuppressants and inhibitors of the enzyme cholinesterase. [More]
UT Arlington scientists explore how fluid flow could play significant role in neuronal growth

UT Arlington scientists explore how fluid flow could play significant role in neuronal growth

A University of Texas at Arlington team exploring how neuron growth can be controlled in the lab and, possibly, in the human body has published a new paper in Nature Scientific Reports on how fluid flow could play a significant role. [More]
New Aalborg University center to study link between maladaptive central nervous system, chronic pain

New Aalborg University center to study link between maladaptive central nervous system, chronic pain

A new research center at Aalborg University in Denmark will investigate how a maladaptive central nervous system can be responsible for the enduring or chronic pain that affects one in five adult Danes. If this major ambition is fulfilled, it may turn the understanding of the pain system on its head and improve treatment. [More]
CHLA reports first confirmed case of enterovirus D68 in Los Angeles

CHLA reports first confirmed case of enterovirus D68 in Los Angeles

In September, Children's Hospital Los Angeles physicians predicted it was a matter of when, and not if, Los Angeles children would become infected with Enterovirus EV-D68, commonly referred to as enterovirus D68. On Oct. 1, that day came. CHLA and public health officials announced that a young patient who had been hospitalized at CHLA with a respiratory illness and later experienced partial limb paralysis had tested positive for enterovirus D68. [More]
Groundbreaking study tracks precise path of rabies to the central nervous system

Groundbreaking study tracks precise path of rabies to the central nervous system

Rabies causes acute inflammation of the brain, producing psychosis and violent aggression. The virus, which paralyzes the body's internal organs, is always deadly for those unable to obtain vaccines in time. Some 55,000 people die from rabies every year. [More]
Researchers analyze incidence of childhood brain tumors

Researchers analyze incidence of childhood brain tumors

Older parents, birth defects, maternal nutrition and childhood exposure to CT scans and pesticides are increasingly being associated with brain tumors in children, according to new research from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis. [More]
Depression contributes to abnormal pain processes in IBS patients

Depression contributes to abnormal pain processes in IBS patients

High rates of anxiety and depression amongst patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have led many researchers to believe there could be a causal relationship between psychological factors and IBS symptoms. Now, scientists in Germany have found clear evidence that patients with IBS process pain signals from the gut abnormally, and that disturbed brain responses to pain are particularly pronounced in patients with more depression symptoms. [More]