Nervous System News and Research RSS Feed - Nervous System News and Research

The nervous system is an organ system containing a network of specialized cells called neurons that coordinate the actions of an animal and transmit signals between different parts of its body. In most animals the nervous system consists of two parts, central and peripheral. The central nervous system contains the brain and spinal cord.
Natalizumab drug helps scientists confirm how 'viral reservoirs' form in HIV patients

Natalizumab drug helps scientists confirm how 'viral reservoirs' form in HIV patients

A drug used to treat patients with Crohn's disease and multiple sclerosis has helped scientists confirm how "viral reservoirs" form in patients living with HIV and also proven effective in animal trials at blocking the pathways to those reservoirs in the brain and gut, a team of researchers reported recently in the journal PLOS Pathogens. [More]
New treatment may bring hope for people suffering from muscle cramps

New treatment may bring hope for people suffering from muscle cramps

A new treatment may bring hope for people who suffer from muscle cramps or spasms from neuromuscular disorders, diseases such as multiple sclerosis or simply from nighttime leg cramps that keep people from sleeping, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 67th Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, April 18 to 25, 2015. [More]
Actavis provides overview of standalone global pharmaceutical development pipeline

Actavis provides overview of standalone global pharmaceutical development pipeline

Actavis plc, during its Investor Meeting in New York, today provided a detailed look into its standalone global pharmaceutical development pipeline that supports the Company's long-term organic growth. The Company provided details regarding key development programs, including clinical data, development milestones and an overview of potential market opportunities, as well as an updated look at Actavis' world-class generics pipeline, which continues to hold an industry-leading position in First-to-File opportunities in the U.S. [More]
Fetal exposure to drugs can cause neurological problems

Fetal exposure to drugs can cause neurological problems

Research suggests that fetal exposure to chemicals or drugs can cause neurological problems. Babies whose mothers take the epilepsy drug valporic acid (VPA) during pregnancy, for example, appear to have an elevated risk of developing an autism spectrum disorder. [More]
CAMH scientists discover potential new approach to treat multiple sclerosis

CAMH scientists discover potential new approach to treat multiple sclerosis

Scientists at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health have discovered a promising new approach to treat multiple sclerosis (MS). In a new study, they've identified a previously unknown change in the spinal cord related to MS, and a way to alter this change to reduce the nerve cell damage that occurs with the disease. [More]
USPTO issues Notice of Allowance to Can-Fite BioPharma for psoriasis patent

USPTO issues Notice of Allowance to Can-Fite BioPharma for psoriasis patent

Can-Fite BioPharma Ltd., a biotechnology company with a pipeline of proprietary small molecule drugs that are being developed to treat inflammatory diseases, cancer and sexual dysfunction, announced today that it has received a Notice of Allowance from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office for CF101 in the treatment of psoriasis. [More]

Research: Complex nerve circuits first evolved in common ancestor of humans and cnidarians

New research shows that a burst of evolutionary innovation in the genes responsible for electrical communication among nerve cells in our brains occurred over 600 million years ago in a common ancestor of humans and the sea anemone. [More]
Hospira announces launch of first biosimilar monoclonal antibody in Europe

Hospira announces launch of first biosimilar monoclonal antibody in Europe

Hospira, Inc., a world leader in the development of biosimilar therapies, today announced the launch of the first biosimilar monoclonal antibody (mAb), Inflectra (infliximab), in major European markets. [More]
Actavis releases generic version of Pulmicort RESPULES

Actavis releases generic version of Pulmicort RESPULES

Actavis plc today announced that it has launched its generic version of AstraZeneca's Pulmicort RESPULES® (budesonide inhalation suspension) 0.25 and 0.5 mg vials following a ruling from the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey that (i) United States Patent No. 7,524,834 is invalid, and (ii) AstraZeneca's request for a permanent injunction is denied. [More]
Thync electrical neurosignaling reduces brain's response to stress, shows study

Thync electrical neurosignaling reduces brain's response to stress, shows study

Thync today announced results from a study published via bioRxiv that show electrical neurosignaling delivered by its consumer wearable device reduces the brain's response to stress in a chemical-free manner. [More]
Stem cell transplants more effective than mitoxantrone drug for people with severe multiple sclerosis

Stem cell transplants more effective than mitoxantrone drug for people with severe multiple sclerosis

Stem cell transplants may be more effective than the drug mitoxantrone for people with severe cases of multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a new study published in the February 11, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
RAB3GAP complex plays important role in autophagy

RAB3GAP complex plays important role in autophagy

Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease are typically characterized by protein deposits in the brain. These are comprised of defective, insoluble proteins which no longer fulfill their function and which cells are unable to break down. The work group headed by Professor Christian Behl of the Institute of Pathobiochemistry of the University Medical Center of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz has determined the RAB3GAP complex as a novel factor that influences the efficient degradation of proteins. [More]
ADDF, Pfizer's CTI collaborate to advance development of new drugs for Alzheimer's disease

ADDF, Pfizer's CTI collaborate to advance development of new drugs for Alzheimer's disease

The Alzheimer's Drug Discovery Foundation and Pfizer's Centers for Therapeutic Innovation announced today a collaboration designed to advance the development of new small-molecule drugs for Alzheimer's disease and related dementias. As part of the first-of-its kind collaboration in Alzheimer's, the ADDF and CTI will jointly invest in translational research projects, with a focus on novel Alzheimer's drug targets. [More]
First human clinical study of ChromaDex's NIAGEN nicotinamide riboside meets primary endpoint

First human clinical study of ChromaDex's NIAGEN nicotinamide riboside meets primary endpoint

ChromaDex Corp. announced today that the initial results of the first human clinical study for the company's NIAGEN nicotinamide riboside (NR) has met its primary endpoint. [More]
UC San Diego School of Medicine project receives 2015 Avant-Garde Award for HIV/AIDS Research

UC San Diego School of Medicine project receives 2015 Avant-Garde Award for HIV/AIDS Research

A University of California, San Diego School of Medicine project involving the creation of miniature models of the human brain - developed with stem cells - to study neurological disorders caused by HIV and methamphetamine use has been named one of five recipients of the 2015 Avant-Garde Award for HIV/AIDS Research from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. [More]
UM one step closer to developing potential drug for treating brain cancer

UM one step closer to developing potential drug for treating brain cancer

Promentis Pharmaceuticals, Inc. recently announced it will enter an exclusive agreement with UM to commercialize a discovery made by a team of UM faculty scientists that has the potential to treat brain cancer and possibly other disorders of the central nervous system. [More]
TUSM researchers awarded $7.4 million to study brain impairment in patients infected with HIV

TUSM researchers awarded $7.4 million to study brain impairment in patients infected with HIV

Researchers at Temple University School of Medicine have been awarded a $7.4 million, five-year grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse to determine how cocaine and HIV-1 interact to cause brain impairment in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. [More]
Epigem contribute to PhD research into Multiple Sclerosis

Epigem contribute to PhD research into Multiple Sclerosis

Epigem, a high-tech British micro engineering company, is supporting research into Multiple Sclerosis (MS) with a new PhD programme to create a novel drug screening platform. This will accelerate the production of MS models and pre-clinical drug development, in order to understand better the disease process and its periods of remission. [More]
Andor Zyla sCMOS Camera enables instantaneous imaging of neuronal activity across whole organism for the first time

Andor Zyla sCMOS Camera enables instantaneous imaging of neuronal activity across whole organism for the first time

The speed, resolution and sensitivity of the Andor Zyla sCMOS camera has allowed the Vaziri research group in Vienna, Austria, to simultaneously image neuronal activity across an entire organism for the first time. [More]
Chiasma announces publication of octreotide capsules Phase III study results in JCEM

Chiasma announces publication of octreotide capsules Phase III study results in JCEM

Chiasma Inc., a U.S. privately-held biopharma company, announced today that results from a multicenter Phase III study of the investigational new drug, octreotide capsules, were published online for early release on Feb. 9, ahead of print, by the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]