Nervous System News and Research RSS Feed - Nervous System News and Research

The nervous system is an organ system containing a network of specialized cells called neurons that coordinate the actions of an animal and transmit signals between different parts of its body. In most animals the nervous system consists of two parts, central and peripheral. The central nervous system contains the brain and spinal cord.
New smartphone app to improve quality of life for older adults

New smartphone app to improve quality of life for older adults

A team of researchers from the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya · BarcelonaTech (UPC) and the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) is creating a smartphone app that will help older adults to understand their state of health and develop healthier habits. [More]
New IOM report includes recommendations to overhaul current graduate medical education system

New IOM report includes recommendations to overhaul current graduate medical education system

The Institute of Medicine released a report, Graduate Medical Education That Meets the Nation's Health Needs, which encompasses recommendations to overhaul the current graduate medical education (GME) system. [More]
Virologists find cells are having to fight virus constantly, even in dormant phase

Virologists find cells are having to fight virus constantly, even in dormant phase

Scientists investigating the herpes virus have been surprised to find an ongoing conflict in the cells of sufferers, even when the virus is apparently dormant. [More]

New specialised clinic, smartphone app aim to improve health outcomes of chronic fatigue patients

Sufferers of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome are set to benefit with the dual launch of a specialist Griffith University clinic and smartphone app, both aimed to manage their illness and improve health outcomes. [More]
Taiwan researchers develop new optical device to detect early complication of diabetes sooner

Taiwan researchers develop new optical device to detect early complication of diabetes sooner

A group of researchers in Taiwan has developed a new optical technology that may be able to detect an early complication of diabetes sooner, when it is more easily treated. If the device proves safe and effective in clinical trials, it may pave the way for the early detection and more effective treatment of this complication, called diabetic autonomic neuropathy, which is common among people with both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. [More]
Researchers investigate functional performance in children with spina bifida

Researchers investigate functional performance in children with spina bifida

Spina bifda (SB) is a complex congenital central nervous system disease that is caused by the incomplete closing of the neural tubes during the embryonic phase. [More]
Discovery could lead to new therapies for treating Type 2 diabetes, obesity

Discovery could lead to new therapies for treating Type 2 diabetes, obesity

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified neural pathways that increase understanding of how the brain regulates body weight, energy expenditure, and blood glucose levels - a discovery that can lead to new therapies for treating Type 2 diabetes and obesity. [More]
Protein once seen as promising anti-cancer compound helps to stabilize neural circuits

Protein once seen as promising anti-cancer compound helps to stabilize neural circuits

Researchers at UC San Francisco (UCSF) have discovered that endostatin, a protein that once aroused intense interest as a possible cancer treatment, plays a key role in the stable functioning of the nervous system. [More]
Scientists one step closer to creating viable cell replacement therapy for multiple sclerosis patients

Scientists one step closer to creating viable cell replacement therapy for multiple sclerosis patients

Scientists at The New York Stem Cell Foundation Research Institute are one step closer to creating a viable cell replacement therapy for multiple sclerosis from a patient's own cells. [More]
Monitoring pulse regularly after stroke helps prevent next stroke

Monitoring pulse regularly after stroke helps prevent next stroke

New research suggests that regularly monitoring your pulse after a stroke or the pulse of a loved one who has experienced a stroke may be a simple and effective first step in detecting irregular heartbeat, a major cause of having a second stroke. [More]
Shire, ArmaGen partner to develop AGT-182 drug for treatment of Hunter syndrome

Shire, ArmaGen partner to develop AGT-182 drug for treatment of Hunter syndrome

Shire plc, the global specialty biopharmaceutical company, and ArmaGen, a US privately held biotechnology company, today announced a worldwide licensing and collaboration agreement for AGT-182, an investigational enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for the potential treatment of both the central nervous system (CNS) and somatic manifestations in patients with Hunter syndrome (MPS II). [More]
Immunosignaturing holds promise for accurate diagnosis of Valley Fever

Immunosignaturing holds promise for accurate diagnosis of Valley Fever

On July 5, 2011, a massive wall of dust, ("haboob," in Arabic), blanketed Phoenix, Arizona, creating an awesome spectacle, (or stubborn nuisance, depending on your perspective). Dust storms are a common occurrence in the arid desert environments of the American Southwest. [More]
Understanding how some cells in the brain and nervous system turn cancerous

Understanding how some cells in the brain and nervous system turn cancerous

Scientists from the Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research in New York with the help of Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry have completed research which for the first time brings us nearer to understanding how some cells in the brain and nervous system become cancerous. [More]

Chemclin's Anti-TP assay provides components for in-vitro qualitative determination of Anti-TP

Chemclin's Anti-TP assay provides components for in-vitro qualitative determination of Antibody to Treponema Pallidum (Anti-TP) in human serum or plasma by a double - antigen sandwich chemiluminescent assay method. [More]
Genomics testing in action: an interview with Kevin Haar, CEO, Appistry

Genomics testing in action: an interview with Kevin Haar, CEO, Appistry

The more connections are made between genes, disease and drugs, and the more that we continue to understand about those connections, the more critical genetic testing will become in modern medicine. [More]
Researchers identify group of cells in brain that plays important role in Down syndrome

Researchers identify group of cells in brain that plays important role in Down syndrome

Researchers from UC Davis School of Medicine and Shriners Hospitals for Children - Northern California have identified a group of cells in the brain that they say plays an important role in the abnormal neuron development in Down syndrome. [More]
Learning role of immune-system cells in digestive tracts may lead to new treatments for IBS

Learning role of immune-system cells in digestive tracts may lead to new treatments for IBS

Learning the role of immune-system cells in healthy digestive tracts and how they interact with neighboring nerve cells may lead to new treatments for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). [More]
Research leads to better understanding of neurodegenerative, neurodevelopmental diseases

Research leads to better understanding of neurodegenerative, neurodevelopmental diseases

Throughout our lives, our brains adapt to what we learn and memorise. The brain is indeed made up of complex networks of neurons and synapses that are constantly re-configured. [More]
Role of immune system cells in healthy digestive tracts may lead to new treatments for IBS

Role of immune system cells in healthy digestive tracts may lead to new treatments for IBS

Learning the role of immune system cells in healthy digestive tracts and how they interact with neighboring nerve cells may lead to new treatments for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). [More]
People with mild traumatic brain injury may have brain damage and memory problems

People with mild traumatic brain injury may have brain damage and memory problems

Even mild traumatic brain injury may cause brain damage and thinking and memory problems, according to a study published in the July 16, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]