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The nervous system is an organ system containing a network of specialized cells called neurons that coordinate the actions of an animal and transmit signals between different parts of its body. In most animals the nervous system consists of two parts, central and peripheral. The central nervous system contains the brain and spinal cord.
Six research institutions awarded NIH grants to create database of human cellular responses

Six research institutions awarded NIH grants to create database of human cellular responses

Building on a successful three-year pilot project, the National Institutes of Health has awarded more than $64 million to six research institutions to create a database of human cellular responses, the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures. [More]
Breathing-based meditation practice can be effective treatment for PTSD

Breathing-based meditation practice can be effective treatment for PTSD

One of the greatest casualties of war is its lasting effect on the minds of soldiers. This presents a daunting public health problem: More than 20 percent of veterans returning from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have post-traumatic stress disorder, according to a 2012 report by RAND Corp. [More]
AbbVie’s Phase 3 pivotal study shows HUMIRA is effective in reducing symptoms in HS

AbbVie’s Phase 3 pivotal study shows HUMIRA is effective in reducing symptoms in HS

AbbVie today announced results from a Phase 3 pivotal study demonstrating that HUMIRA® (adalimumab) is effective in reducing common clinical signs and symptoms in moderate-to-severe hidradenitis suppurativa (HS), specifically the number of abscesses and inflammatory nodules. [More]
Study looks at blood type and risk of cognitive impairment

Study looks at blood type and risk of cognitive impairment

People with blood type AB may be more likely to develop memory loss in later years than people with other blood types, according to a study published in the September 10, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Pollution in many cities threatens brain development in children

Pollution in many cities threatens brain development in children

Pollution in many cities threatens the brain development in children. Findings by University of Montana Professor Dr. Lilian Calder-n-Garcidue-as, MA, MD, Ph.D., and her team of researchers reveal that children living in megacities are at increased risk for brain inflammation and neurodegenerative changes, including Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease. [More]
Dell, Terascala and TGen to install genomic data management solution at NCI

Dell, Terascala and TGen to install genomic data management solution at NCI

Dell, Terascala and the Translational Genomics Research Institute are installing state-of-the-art computing and programing specialized for human genome investigations at the National Cancer Institute. [More]
Fogarty receives three grants for research focused on biodiversity conservation

Fogarty receives three grants for research focused on biodiversity conservation

In addition to diseases for which there are ineffective or no cures, key pathogens are becoming increasingly drug-resistant. [More]
People with multiple sclerosis lose myelin in gray matter

People with multiple sclerosis lose myelin in gray matter

People with multiple sclerosis (MS) lose myelin in the gray matter of their brains and the loss is closely correlated with the severity of the disease, according to a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. [More]
Researchers examine whether new drug offers added benefit for patients with chronic HCV

Researchers examine whether new drug offers added benefit for patients with chronic HCV

The drug simeprevir has been available since May 2014 for the treatment of adult patients with chronic hepatitis C infection. [More]
Researcher designs remote medical care system to support rehabilitation of people with spasticity

Researcher designs remote medical care system to support rehabilitation of people with spasticity

Yadira Alatriste, researcher at the Autonomous Metropolitan University of Mexico designed a remote medical care system that supports the rehabilitation of people with spasticity, an alteration of the nervous system related to increased tone muscle making motor skills difficult or impossible for those affected. [More]
AMPK gene can slow aging process when activated remotely in key organ systems

AMPK gene can slow aging process when activated remotely in key organ systems

UCLA biologists have identified a gene that can slow the aging process throughout the entire body when activated remotely in key organ systems. [More]
Research to help patients suffering from severe spinal cord injuries

Research to help patients suffering from severe spinal cord injuries

Many patients suffer from severe spinal cord injuries after being involved in traffic accidents or accidents at work. [More]
People with increased yellow in macula could maintain better vision: Study

People with increased yellow in macula could maintain better vision: Study

Human eyes naturally contain yellow pigment in the macula, a spot near the center of the retina responsible for high-resolution vision. Those with more yellow in their macula may have an advantage when it comes to filtering out atmospheric particles that obscure one's vision, commonly known as haze. [More]
Mice who have partial deficiency of gene SENP2 are more likely to develop seizures, sudden death

Mice who have partial deficiency of gene SENP2 are more likely to develop seizures, sudden death

A gene crucial for brain and heart development may also be associated with sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP), the most common cause of early mortality in epilepsy patients. [More]
Findings may help develop biomarkers to identify HIV patients at risk of dementia

Findings may help develop biomarkers to identify HIV patients at risk of dementia

Since the introduction of the combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART) in the mid-90s, the life expectancy of HIV patients has significantly improved. As a result, long-term complications are becoming more relevant: almost every second HIV patient is affected by neurocognitive disorders, which can lead to dementia. [More]
Study investigates whether function of intestines attacked in MS

Study investigates whether function of intestines attacked in MS

The present study investigates whether the function of the intestines is also attacked in MS. The results, obtained from a disease model of MS in mice, shows inflammation and changes in the barrier function of the intestines early in the course of the disease. [More]
Researchers examine link between sleep difficulties and brain volume

Researchers examine link between sleep difficulties and brain volume

Sleep difficulties may be linked to faster rates of decline in brain volume, according to a study published in the September 3, 2014, online issue of Neurology-, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Neuroscientist discovers new mechanism that can reverse chronic pain

Neuroscientist discovers new mechanism that can reverse chronic pain

It's in the brain where we perceive the unpleasant sensations of pain, and researchers have long been examining how calcium channels in the brain and peripheral nervous system contribute to the development of chronic pain conditions. [More]
Yoga program for MS patients improves physical and mental well-being

Yoga program for MS patients improves physical and mental well-being

Paula Meltzer was only 38 when out of nowhere everything she looked at was blurry. For the single mother, who had a lucrative career as a gemologist and spent hours examining valuable pieces of jewelry, it seemed as if - in a split second - her life changed. [More]
Nasal septum cells can repair human articular cartilage defects

Nasal septum cells can repair human articular cartilage defects

Human articular cartilage defects can be treated with nasal septum cells. Researchers at the University and the University Hospital of Basel report that cells taken from the nasal septum are able to adapt to the environment of the knee joint and can thus repair articular cartilage defects. [More]