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The nervous system is an organ system containing a network of specialized cells called neurons that coordinate the actions of an animal and transmit signals between different parts of its body. In most animals the nervous system consists of two parts, central and peripheral. The central nervous system contains the brain and spinal cord.
Multiple sclerosis relapse management: an interview with Gina Remington

Multiple sclerosis relapse management: an interview with Gina Remington

MS relapses are typically reflective of new neurological symptoms. However, it can be a worsening of neurologic symptoms that begins after a patient has been stable (generally for about 30 days), but relapses are persistent and consistent changes in symptoms that occur for more than 24 to 48 hours. [More]
New research shows concussion may affect men and women differently

New research shows concussion may affect men and women differently

New research suggests concussion may not significantly impair symptoms or cognitive skills for one gender over another, however, women may still experience greater symptoms and poorer cognitive performance at preseason testing. [More]
Lupin signs strategic asset purchase agreement with Temmler

Lupin signs strategic asset purchase agreement with Temmler

Pharma Major Lupin Limited today announced that it has entered into a strategic asset purchase agreement with TEMMLER PHARMA GMBH & CO. KG, a part of the Aenova Group, one of the world's largest pharmaceutical contract manufacturers, to acquire Temmler's specialty product portfolio subject to certain closing conditions. [More]
Migraines may increase risk of stroke among smokers

Migraines may increase risk of stroke among smokers

New research suggests older people who experience migraines may have an increased risk of stroke, but only if they are smokers. The study is published in the July 22, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Body fat can send stress signals, say University of Florida Health researchers

Body fat can send stress signals, say University of Florida Health researchers

The brain's effect on other parts of the body has been well established. Now, a group that includes two University of Florida Health researchers has found that it's a two-way street: Body fat can send a signal that affects the way the brain deals with stress and metabolism. [More]
Omeros' OMS721 granted FDA Fast Track designation for treatment of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

Omeros' OMS721 granted FDA Fast Track designation for treatment of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

Omeros Corporation today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration granted Fast Track designation to OMS721 for the treatment of patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS). OMS721 is the company's lead human monoclonal antibody targeting mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2), the key regulator of the lectin pathway of the immune system. [More]
Study explores possible pathways that may lead kids toward aggressive behavior later in life

Study explores possible pathways that may lead kids toward aggressive behavior later in life

A University at Buffalo developmental psychologist has received a $550,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to study possible pathways that might lead young children toward different types of aggressive behavior later in life. [More]
More people turn to popular new blood thinners for atrial fibrillation treatment

More people turn to popular new blood thinners for atrial fibrillation treatment

More adults than ever are visiting their doctors' offices for a prescription to treat atrial fibrillation, according to a study led by the University of Michigan Frankel Cardiovascular Center. [More]
MetLife Foundation Awards for Medical Research presented at AAIC 2015

MetLife Foundation Awards for Medical Research presented at AAIC 2015

At the Alzheimer's Association International Conference 2015 in Washington D.C., MetLife Foundation presented its annual MetLife Foundation Awards for Medical Research. These awards were presented to Randall Bateman, M.D., and Christian Haass, Ph.D., for their contributions in advancing Alzheimer's disease research. [More]
Children recover well from acute central nervous system demyelination

Children recover well from acute central nervous system demyelination

Most children can expect a good and quick physical recovery following acute central nervous system demyelination, study findings suggest. [More]
Allergan announces U.S. availability of SAPHRIS 2.5 mg tablets for children with bipolar I disorder

Allergan announces U.S. availability of SAPHRIS 2.5 mg tablets for children with bipolar I disorder

Allergan plc today announced that SAPHRIS (asenapine) 2.5 mg sublingual (placed under the tongue) black-cherry flavored tablets are available in pharmacies throughout the U.S. In March 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved SAPHRIS for the acute treatment of manic or mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder in pediatric patients (ages 10 – 17). [More]
C2N-8E12 (ABBV-8E12) gets orphan drug designation from FDA for PSP treatment

C2N-8E12 (ABBV-8E12) gets orphan drug designation from FDA for PSP treatment

C2N Diagnostics and AbbVie today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted their investigational recombinant humanized anti-tau antibody, C2N-8E12 (ABBV-8E12), an orphan drug designation for the treatment of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). [More]
WSU's Li Yao explores use of electrical signal for treating spinal cord injuries

WSU's Li Yao explores use of electrical signal for treating spinal cord injuries

Wichita State University's Li Yao is taking a special approach to the study of spinal cord injuries through research that uses an electrical signal to repair tissue damage. [More]
Next-generation tissue implant allows neuroscientists to wirelessly control neurons inside the brains of mice

Next-generation tissue implant allows neuroscientists to wirelessly control neurons inside the brains of mice

A study showed that scientists can wirelessly determine the path a mouse walks with a press of a button. Researchers at the Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, and University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, created a remote controlled, next-generation tissue implant that allows neuroscientists to inject drugs and shine lights on neurons deep inside the brains of mice. [More]
New findings point toward potential blood test to detect schizophrenia

New findings point toward potential blood test to detect schizophrenia

High blood levels of a growth factor known to enable new blood vessel development and brain cell protection correlate with a smaller size of brain areas key to complex thought, emotion and behavior in patients with schizophrenia, researchers report in the journal Molecular Psychiatry. [More]
Gene therapy used for sight restoration also strengthens visual pathways in the brain

Gene therapy used for sight restoration also strengthens visual pathways in the brain

Since 2007, clinical trials using gene therapy have resulted in often-dramatic sight restoration for dozens of children and adults who were otherwise doomed to blindness. Now, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, have found evidence that this sight restoration leads to strengthening of visual pathways in the brain, published this week in Science Translational Medicine. [More]
Discovery brings hope for people suffering from Parkinson's disease

Discovery brings hope for people suffering from Parkinson's disease

Scientists from Singapore's Nanyang Technological University and McLean Hospital and Harvard Medical School in the United States have found that existing anti-malaria drugs could be a potential treatment for Parkinson's disease. [More]
Key parts of the human brain network give power to control, redirect attention

Key parts of the human brain network give power to control, redirect attention

Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have found that key parts of the human brain network that give us the power to control and redirect our attention--a core cognitive ability--may be unique to humans. [More]
Research could lead to new approaches to treating spinal cord and brain injuries

Research could lead to new approaches to treating spinal cord and brain injuries

Many an injury will heal, but the damaged spinal cord is notoriously recalcitrant. There's new hope on the horizon, though. A team of researchers led by the University of South Carolina's Jeff Twiss just reported an innate repair mechanism in central nervous system axons that might be harnessed to regenerate nerves after brain or spinal cord injuries. [More]
Innovation in anaesthesia: an interview with Matti Lehtonen, GE Healthcare

Innovation in anaesthesia: an interview with Matti Lehtonen, GE Healthcare

The spectrum of patients seen today, from pre-term infants to the morbidly obese to the longer living elderly, is wider than ever before and increasingly more challenging with patients often presenting with multiple co-morbidities. This puts a huge strain on healthcare providers who are facing increasing challenges such as cost pressure and staff shortages. [More]
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