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The nervous system is an organ system containing a network of specialized cells called neurons that coordinate the actions of an animal and transmit signals between different parts of its body. In most animals the nervous system consists of two parts, central and peripheral. The central nervous system contains the brain and spinal cord.
TBX5 gene expression could play key role in congenital heart disease

TBX5 gene expression could play key role in congenital heart disease

Congenital heart disease is the most common birth defect and the leading cause of all infant deaths in the United States. Mutations in the gene TBX5 have been shown to cause both rare and more prevalent forms of congenital heart disease, yet the underlying mechanisms have remained unclear. [More]
People with traumatic brain injuries may have buildup of plaques related to Alzheimer's disease

People with traumatic brain injuries may have buildup of plaques related to Alzheimer's disease

A new study suggests that people with brain injuries following head trauma may have buildup of the plaques related to Alzheimer's disease in their brains. The research is published in the February 3, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
UCI researchers identify potential strategies to prevent cognitive decline

UCI researchers identify potential strategies to prevent cognitive decline

As brain cells age they lose the fibers that receive neural impulses, a change that may underlie cognitive decline. Researchers at the University of California, Irvine recently found a way to reverse this process in rats. The study was published February 3 in The Journal of Neuroscience. Researchers caution that more studies are needed, but the findings shed light on the mechanisms of cognitive decline and identify potential strategies to stem it. [More]
Seafood consumption may benefit older adults at risk for Alzheimer's disease

Seafood consumption may benefit older adults at risk for Alzheimer's disease

New research published Feb. 2 in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that older adults with a major risk gene for Alzheimer's disease known as APOE?4 who ate at least one seafood serving per week showed fewer signs of Alzheimer's-related brain changes. In contrast, this association was not found in the brains of volunteers who ate fish weekly but did not carry the risk gene. [More]
New approach to investigate how neurodevelopment influences diseases in adulthood

New approach to investigate how neurodevelopment influences diseases in adulthood

The Research Training Group, which builds on translational research training programmes and research structures such as the Molecular Medicine degree programme and the Interdisciplinary Centre for Clinical Research, will work on areas where basic research and clinical practice overlap. It will bring together 20 doctoral candidates from the natural sciences and 28 from medicine. [More]
Saliva gland test may help diagnose early Parkinson's disease

Saliva gland test may help diagnose early Parkinson's disease

Researchers from Mayo Clinic in Arizona and Banner Sun Health Research Institute have determined that testing a portion of a person's submandibular gland may be a way to diagnose early Parkinson's disease. The study was published this month in Movement Disorders, the official journal of the International Parkinson and Movement Disorders Society. [More]
TPC reports first cases of illness, deaths due to Dewshine mixture in Tennessee

TPC reports first cases of illness, deaths due to Dewshine mixture in Tennessee

A lethal concoction of racing fuel and Mountain Dew claimed the lives of two Tennessee teens and has sparked the Tennessee Poison Center to warn about the lethality of what has been called "Dewshine." [More]
Research offers novel insights into root causes of schizophrenia

Research offers novel insights into root causes of schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is a mysterious and devastating disorder that afflicts one percent of the adult population worldwide. Its symptoms — hallucinations, emotional withdrawal, and cognitive impairment — are chronic and typically emerge just as individuals are entering adulthood. Today's medications treat just one of these symptoms (psychosis); treatments for the underlying disease and its many other symptoms have been hard to develop, because no one really understands what causes the disorder. [More]
Unobtrusive patch on the forehead provides relief from PTSD

Unobtrusive patch on the forehead provides relief from PTSD

An average of 30 years had passed since the traumatic events that had left them depressed, anxious, irritable, hypervigilant, unable to sleep well and prone to nightmares. [More]
Researchers discover previously unknown mechanism that regulates neurogenesis

Researchers discover previously unknown mechanism that regulates neurogenesis

Bassem Hassan's team at VIB/KU Leuven has discovered a previously unknown mechanism that is highly conserved between species and which regulates neurogenesis through precise temporal control of the activity of a family of proteins essential for brain development: the proneural proteins. [More]
Allergan and AstraZeneca partner to develop, commercialize ATM-AVI for MBL-producing pathogens

Allergan and AstraZeneca partner to develop, commercialize ATM-AVI for MBL-producing pathogens

Allergan plc today announced that it has entered into a global agreement with AstraZeneca to develop and commercialize ATM-AVI, an investigational, fixed-dose antibiotic combining aztreonam and avibactam. [More]
Clinicoradiological syndromes allow rapid recognition of EV71 neurological problems

Clinicoradiological syndromes allow rapid recognition of EV71 neurological problems

Severe enterovirus 71 neurological disease in children predominantly involves the spinal cord and brainstem and can be quickly recognised using the World Health Organisation classification of clinicoradiological syndromes, study findings suggest. [More]
Allergan's investigational medication rapastinel granted FDA Breakthrough Therapy designation

Allergan's investigational medication rapastinel granted FDA Breakthrough Therapy designation

Allergan plc., a leading global pharmaceutical company today announced that its Phase III ready investigational medication rapastinel (GLYX-13) received Breakthrough Therapy designation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for adjunctive treatment of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). [More]
New NYUCD study explores how gene expression initiated in notochord

New NYUCD study explores how gene expression initiated in notochord

A new study by basic science researchers in the Department of Basic Science and Craniofacial Biology at New York University College of Dentistry sought to understand how gene expression is initiated in the notochord, the evolutionary and developmental precursor of the backbone. [More]
Researchers create new neuronal connections for the first time

Researchers create new neuronal connections for the first time

That very fine hair-line object that you see being pulled across the screen is actually a neuron being made. A research team led by McGill University and the Montreal Neurological Institute has managed to create new functional connections between neurons for the first time. Apart from the fact that these artificial neurons grow over 60 times faster than neurons naturally do, they are indistinguishable from ones that grow naturally in our bodies. [More]
Anticholinergic medications may not be best option for dementia patients in rehab facility

Anticholinergic medications may not be best option for dementia patients in rehab facility

During rehabilitation following an acute hospital stay, medications that block neurotransmitters may be overprescribed to older patients suffering from delirium superimposed on dementia, according to health researchers. [More]
Study: Prenatal exposure to flame retardants may have lasting effect on child's executive function

Study: Prenatal exposure to flame retardants may have lasting effect on child's executive function

New research from the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine suggests that prenatal exposure to flame retardants and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) commonly found in the environment may have a lasting effect on a child's cognitive and behavioral development, known as executive function. [More]
Brain-derived neurotrophic factor linked to slower cognitive decline in older people

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor linked to slower cognitive decline in older people

Older people with higher amounts of a key protein in their brains also had slower decline in their memory and thinking abilities than people with lower amounts of protein from the gene called brain-derived neurotrophic factor, or BDNF, according to a study published in the January 27, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Study leads to FDA approval of first immunotherapy for treatment of neuroblastoma

Study leads to FDA approval of first immunotherapy for treatment of neuroblastoma

Building upon more than two decades of basic research conducted at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Araz Marachelian, MD, of CHLA, and her colleagues at pediatric academic centers across the U. S., have shown that an immunotherapy that until now has only been available to patients enrolled in research studies, is equivalent to the product that has been manufactured for commercial use and can be made available to all patients. [More]
Neurocutaneous disorders affect skin, nervous system

Neurocutaneous disorders affect skin, nervous system

One of the most common genetic disorders is a condition called neurofibromatosis, which causes brown spots on the skin and benign tumors on the brain, spinal cord and other parts of the nervous system. [More]
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