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The nervous system is an organ system containing a network of specialized cells called neurons that coordinate the actions of an animal and transmit signals between different parts of its body. In most animals the nervous system consists of two parts, central and peripheral. The central nervous system contains the brain and spinal cord.
New tool that simulates user interaction can help develop accessible ICT applications for people with disabilities

New tool that simulates user interaction can help develop accessible ICT applications for people with disabilities

A tool developed by researchers from UPM allows us to assess usability during the design and testing process of accessible ICT-based applications. [More]
Zinbryta gets FDA approval for treating adults with relapsing forms of MS

Zinbryta gets FDA approval for treating adults with relapsing forms of MS

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Zinbryta (daclizumab) for the treatment of adults with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Zinbryta is a long-acting injection that is self- administered by the patient monthly. [More]
Researchers discover ANKRD55 gene linked to multiple sclerosis

Researchers discover ANKRD55 gene linked to multiple sclerosis

The Ikerbasque researcher Koen Vandenbroeck, who heads the Neurogenomiks laboratory which reports to the Achucarro centre and the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country, together with other national and international groups, has shown that a genetic variant in the 5q11 chromosome, which is associated with susceptibility to developing multiple sclerosis, greatly regulates a gene known as ANKRD55. ANKRD55 is a gene with an unknown function. [More]
Research sheds light on how subtle genetic differences in DMD patients produce variation in symptoms

Research sheds light on how subtle genetic differences in DMD patients produce variation in symptoms

Johns Hopkins researchers report they have inadvertently found a way to make human muscle cells bearing genetic mutations from people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). [More]
Fasting-mimicking diet may help decrease multiple sclerosis symptoms

Fasting-mimicking diet may help decrease multiple sclerosis symptoms

Evidence is mounting that a diet mimicking the effects of fasting has health benefits beyond weight loss, with a new USC-led study indicating that it may reduce symptoms of multiple sclerosis. [More]
Study reveals males and females exhibit different stress responses

Study reveals males and females exhibit different stress responses

How does stress - which, among other things, causes our bodies to divert resources from non-essential functions - affect the basic exchange of materials that underlies our everyday life? Weizmann Institute of Science researchers investigated this question by looking at a receptor in the brains of mice, and they came up with a surprising answer. [More]
Specific immune system genes may determine how long people can live with glioblastoma

Specific immune system genes may determine how long people can live with glioblastoma

Researchers have identified a group of immune system genes that may play a role in how long people can live after developing a common type of brain cancer called glioblastoma multiforme, a tumor of the glial cells in the brain. [More]
AF-related symptoms and quality of life worse in women

AF-related symptoms and quality of life worse in women

Women with atrial fibrillation experience more severe symptoms, a lower quality of life and a higher risk of stroke than men, but they have better overall survival, US study data show. [More]
Investigational drug abemaciclib shows durable clinical activity for variety of cancer types

Investigational drug abemaciclib shows durable clinical activity for variety of cancer types

The investigational anticancer therapeutic abemaciclib, which targets CDK4 and CDK6, showed durable clinical activity when given as continuous single-agent therapy to patients with a variety of cancer types, including breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), glioblastoma, and melanoma, according to results from a phase I clinical trial. [More]
ULK1, ULK2 enzymes play key role in maintaining cellular homeostasis

ULK1, ULK2 enzymes play key role in maintaining cellular homeostasis

Researchers at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have uncovered how two enzymes, ULK1 and ULK2, which are best known for their role in the degradation and recycling of proteins, control the trafficking of specific proteins. [More]
Maternal pregabalin exposure linked to major birth defect risk

Maternal pregabalin exposure linked to major birth defect risk

First trimester exposure to pregabalin may be associated with an increased risk of major birth defects, an observational study suggests. [More]
Understanding antibody transport mechanisms in the brain

Understanding antibody transport mechanisms in the brain

Diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), such as stroke, brain cancer, and Alzheimer's disease, are a serious threat affecting over 50 million Americans with an associated cost of over $750 billion per year, which is expected to grow significantly over the coming decades. [More]
Taking pregabalin drug during pregnancy could lead to major birth defects

Taking pregabalin drug during pregnancy could lead to major birth defects

A drug commonly used to treat pain, epilepsy, anxiety and other brain health disorders may be associated with an increased risk of major birth defects, according to a study published in the May 18, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Conventional repeated radiation treatments may offer no major benefit to brain tumor patients

Conventional repeated radiation treatments may offer no major benefit to brain tumor patients

A new study shows that repeated radiation therapy used to target tumors in the brain may not be as safe to healthy brain cells as previously assumed. [More]
Effective chemotherapeutic drug may induce permanent hearing loss in Cockayne syndrome individuals

Effective chemotherapeutic drug may induce permanent hearing loss in Cockayne syndrome individuals

The chemotherapy drug cisplatin can kill cancer, but it can also cause permanent hearing loss. [More]
Play-based procedural preparation helps reduce sedation use and costs tied to cranial radiation therapy

Play-based procedural preparation helps reduce sedation use and costs tied to cranial radiation therapy

New research from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital shows support interventions by child life specialists decrease sedation use and costs associated with cranial radiation therapy. [More]
Drexel study shows how microtubules play vital role in keeping neurons on proper trajectory

Drexel study shows how microtubules play vital role in keeping neurons on proper trajectory

As the human brain develops, neurons leave their birthplace and take a trip to distant locations. Once they reach their final destination, the neurons then send out axons and dendrites -- the branches that receive and send messages from other cells. [More]
Study finds greater activation of biological fight or flight mechanism in chronic fatigue syndrome patients

Study finds greater activation of biological fight or flight mechanism in chronic fatigue syndrome patients

Chronic fatigue syndrome patients report they are more anxious and distressed than people who don't have the condition, and they are also more likely to suppress those emotions. [More]
Risk factors for hospital readmission after pediatric neurosurgical procedures

Risk factors for hospital readmission after pediatric neurosurgical procedures

Researchers at The University of Alabama at Birmingham have determined specific risk factors associated with hospital readmission following pediatric neurosurgery. [More]
Experimental hepatitis C drug slows down development of Zika in mice

Experimental hepatitis C drug slows down development of Zika in mice

Virologists from KU Leuven, Belgium, have shown that an experimental antiviral drug against hepatitis C slows down the development of Zika in mice. The research team was led by Professor Johan Neyts from the Laboratory of Virology and Chemotherapy. [More]
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