Nervous System News and Research RSS Feed - Nervous System News and Research

The nervous system is an organ system containing a network of specialized cells called neurons that coordinate the actions of an animal and transmit signals between different parts of its body. In most animals the nervous system consists of two parts, central and peripheral. The central nervous system contains the brain and spinal cord.
Chemclin's Anti-TP assay provides components for in-vitro qualitative determination of Anti-TP

Chemclin's Anti-TP assay provides components for in-vitro qualitative determination of Anti-TP

Chemclin's Anti-TP assay provides components for in-vitro qualitative determination of Antibody to Treponema Pallidum (Anti-TP) in human serum or plasma by a double - antigen sandwich chemiluminescent assay method. [More]
Genomics testing in action: an interview with Kevin Haar, CEO, Appistry

Genomics testing in action: an interview with Kevin Haar, CEO, Appistry

The more connections are made between genes, disease and drugs, and the more that we continue to understand about those connections, the more critical genetic testing will become in modern medicine. [More]
Researchers identify group of cells in brain that plays important role in Down syndrome

Researchers identify group of cells in brain that plays important role in Down syndrome

Researchers from UC Davis School of Medicine and Shriners Hospitals for Children - Northern California have identified a group of cells in the brain that they say plays an important role in the abnormal neuron development in Down syndrome. [More]
Learning role of immune-system cells in digestive tracts may lead to new treatments for IBS

Learning role of immune-system cells in digestive tracts may lead to new treatments for IBS

Learning the role of immune-system cells in healthy digestive tracts and how they interact with neighboring nerve cells may lead to new treatments for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). [More]
Research leads to better understanding of neurodegenerative, neurodevelopmental diseases

Research leads to better understanding of neurodegenerative, neurodevelopmental diseases

Throughout our lives, our brains adapt to what we learn and memorise. The brain is indeed made up of complex networks of neurons and synapses that are constantly re-configured. [More]
Role of immune system cells in healthy digestive tracts may lead to new treatments for IBS

Role of immune system cells in healthy digestive tracts may lead to new treatments for IBS

Learning the role of immune system cells in healthy digestive tracts and how they interact with neighboring nerve cells may lead to new treatments for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). [More]
People with mild traumatic brain injury may have brain damage and memory problems

People with mild traumatic brain injury may have brain damage and memory problems

Even mild traumatic brain injury may cause brain damage and thinking and memory problems, according to a study published in the July 16, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Research sheds new light on brain's complicated barrier tissue

Research sheds new light on brain's complicated barrier tissue

Research from the University of Copenhagen is shedding new light on the brain's complicated barrier tissue. The blood-brain barrier is an effective barrier which protects the brain, but which at the same time makes it difficult to treat diseases such as Alzheimer's. [More]
Paracetamol safety and osteoarthritis: an interview with Professor David Hunter, University of Sydney

Paracetamol safety and osteoarthritis: an interview with Professor David Hunter, University of Sydney

Firstly, paracetamol has been the first-line recommended treatment for osteoarthritis pain for very many years and, secondly, it is readily available over the counter and can be bought in relatively large quantities. [More]
Noninvasive optical imaging device helps to detect changes linked with Alzheimer's disease

Noninvasive optical imaging device helps to detect changes linked with Alzheimer's disease

A noninvasive optical imaging device developed at Cedars-Sinai can provide early detection of changes that later occur in the brain and are a classic sign of Alzheimer's disease, according to preliminary results from investigators conducting a clinical trial in Australia. [More]
Astrocytes play role in forming inhibitory synapses

Astrocytes play role in forming inhibitory synapses

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil- In the brains of all vertebrates, information is transmitted through synapses, a mechanism that allows an electric or chemical signal to be passed from one brain cell to another. [More]
Researchers examine which teens have emotional symptoms after concussion

Researchers examine which teens have emotional symptoms after concussion

After a concussion, teens who are sensitive to light or noise may be more likely to also have emotional symptoms such as anxiety, according to a study released today that will be presented at The Sports Concussion Conference in Chicago, July 11 to 13, 2014, hosted by the American Academy of Neurology, the world's leading authority on diagnosing and managing sports concussion. [More]
New study sheds light on role of RPM-1 protein in neuron development

New study sheds light on role of RPM-1 protein in neuron development

In a new study, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have shed new light on these complex processes, showing that a particular protein plays a far more sophisticated role in neuron development than previously thought. [More]
Sigma-Tau Rare Disease seeks EMA approval for use of Oncaspar for ALL treatment

Sigma-Tau Rare Disease seeks EMA approval for use of Oncaspar for ALL treatment

Sigma Tau Pharma Ltd. (hereinafter referred to as Sigma-Tau Rare Disease), today announced the submission of an application to the European Medicines Agency for use of its pegylatedL-asparaginase, Oncaspar (pegaspargase) for the treatment of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia (ALL) as part of a multi-agent chemotherapeutic regimen. [More]
Kaleo announces U.S. availability of EVZIO for emergency treatment of opioid overdose

Kaleo announces U.S. availability of EVZIO for emergency treatment of opioid overdose

Kaleo, a privately-held pharmaceutical company headquartered in Richmond, Virginia, today announced the United States (U.S.) commercial availability of EVZIO for the emergency treatment of known or suspected opioid overdose, as manifested by respiratory and/or central nervous system depression. [More]
Study reveals how HIV virus spreads infection

Study reveals how HIV virus spreads infection

Research led by the University of Adelaide has provided new insights into how the HIV virus greatly boosts its chances of spreading infection, and why HIV is so hard to combat. [More]
Gene therapy can improve regenerative capacity of injured RGCs

Gene therapy can improve regenerative capacity of injured RGCs

Because the adult mammalian central nervous system has only limited intrinsic capacity to regenerate connections after injury, due to factors both intrinsic and extrinsic to the mature neuron, therapies are required to support the survival of injured neurons and to promote the long-distance regrowth of axons back to their original target structures. [More]
New paper states that doctors have ethical obligation to educate, protect athletes from concussion

New paper states that doctors have ethical obligation to educate, protect athletes from concussion

The American Academy of Neurology (AAN), the largest professional association of neurologists and a leading authority on sports concussion, is releasing a new position paper that states doctors have an ethical obligation to educate and protect athletes from sports concussion and clear them to play only when the athlete is medically ready, standing firm against objections from players, parents or coaches. [More]

People can be conditioned to feel less pain when they hear neutral sound

People can be conditioned to feel less pain when they hear a neutral sound, new research from the University of Luxembourg has found. This lends weight to the idea that we can learn to use mind-over-matter to beat pain. The scientific article was published recently in the online journal "PLOS One". [More]
New therapeutic targets release mechanisms in reactive astrocytes for treatment of Alzheimer's disease

New therapeutic targets release mechanisms in reactive astrocytes for treatment of Alzheimer's disease

Alzheimer's disease, which is the most common cause of dementia, is fatal and currently, there is no cure. In Alzheimer's disease, brain cells are damaged and destroyed, leading to devastating memory loss. [More]