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Siemens Healthineers' new CT and MRI technologies to aid research across various common clinical pathways

Siemens Healthineers' new CT and MRI technologies to aid research across various common clinical pathways

The Transforming Outcomes and Health Economics Through Imaging (TOHETI) programme is looking to change the way medical imaging works by undertaking a range of pioneering research. [More]
Neurofibromatosis causes benign tumor formation in normal nervous tissue

Neurofibromatosis causes benign tumor formation in normal nervous tissue

Although neurofibromatosis (NF) is not commonly discussed, it affects more than 2 million people worldwide. [More]
Photodynamic therapy effective in treating porphyrias but can be severely painful, cause inflammation

Photodynamic therapy effective in treating porphyrias but can be severely painful, cause inflammation

Severe paleness and photosensitivity are two symptoms of a rare group of hereditary diseases that affect haem, a substance in the blood. While these metabolic disorders - known as the porphyrias - are extremely rare, a similar effect is often deliberately triggered by dermatologists in localised areas during the treatment of pre-cancerous skin lesions and skin cancers. [More]
The future of simulated teaching methods: an interview with Dr Robert Amyot

The future of simulated teaching methods: an interview with Dr Robert Amyot

In healthcare, we have physicians, nurses and paramedics who know the textbook by heart and know exactly what they need to do, but have never experienced the procedure first-hand, or they have no experience responding to adverse events that may occur. [More]
SLU to conduct human clinical trial of vaccine to protect people from Zika virus

SLU to conduct human clinical trial of vaccine to protect people from Zika virus

Saint Louis University's vaccine center has been tapped by the National Institutes of Health to conduct a human clinical trial of a vaccine to prevent the Zika virus, which can cause devastating birth defects in babies. [More]
Taking ipilimumab, nivolumab drugs may increase risk of developing rheumatologic diseases

Taking ipilimumab, nivolumab drugs may increase risk of developing rheumatologic diseases

Case reports on 13 cancer patients suggest that a small number of cancer patients taking the immunotherapy drugs ipilimumab and nivolumab may be at some higher-than-normal risk of developing autoimmune joint and tissue diseases, including inflammatory arthritis, according to a preliminary study by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers. [More]
IU researchers identify suite of genes that play role in nerve sensitivity

IU researchers identify suite of genes that play role in nerve sensitivity

Indiana University researchers have that found a suite of genes in both fruit flies and humans -- including one dubbed "smoke alarm" -- plays a role in nerve sensitivity. The study could help lead to new drug targets in pain management. [More]
Athens QRS score flags false-negative exercise stress tests

Athens QRS score flags false-negative exercise stress tests

Patients with a low Athens QRS score are highly likely to have coronary artery disease even if they have a normal exercise stress test, say researchers. [More]
Researchers use wristband sensors to detect how opioid users in emergency room reacted to dosages

Researchers use wristband sensors to detect how opioid users in emergency room reacted to dosages

There is merit in looking at the use of wearable biosensors to detect whether opioid users stay focused on their rehabilitation programs. [More]
New optical detection technology could be effective to monitor blood-glucose levels

New optical detection technology could be effective to monitor blood-glucose levels

A newly developed method for detecting glucose based on how it absorbs a specific type of light could spell the end of the painful, invasive finger-prick tests diabetics rely on to monitor their condition, says a Texas A&M University biomedical engineer who is developing the technology. [More]
Study finds dramatic increase in nonmedical use of prescription opioids in the U.S.

Study finds dramatic increase in nonmedical use of prescription opioids in the U.S.

Nonmedical use of prescription opioids more than doubled among adults in the United States from 2001-2002 to 2012-2013, based on a study from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, part of the National Institutes of Health. Nearly 10 million Americans, or 4.1 percent of the adult population, used opioid medications in 2012-2013 a class of drugs that includes OxyContin and Vicodin, without a prescription or not as prescribed (in greater amounts, more often, or longer than prescribed) in the past year. [More]
New optogenetic manipulation technique could possibly reduce migraine headaches

New optogenetic manipulation technique could possibly reduce migraine headaches

Despite decades of research, migraines are often not well controlled with medication. For those prone to this type of debilitating headache, it sometimes seems nothing can stop the pain and the sensitivity to light. But what if light itself was key to their relief? [More]
Researchers uncover new clues about role of glucosamine in early embryonic development

Researchers uncover new clues about role of glucosamine in early embryonic development

Most pregnant women with well-controlled diabetes give birth to healthy children. But their babies run much higher risks of birth defects than babies born to women without diabetes, because very early in embryonic development, the babies are exposed to higher levels of glucose in maternal blood. [More]
Experts discuss innovative, non-surgical approaches to treat varicose veins

Experts discuss innovative, non-surgical approaches to treat varicose veins

Are you embarrassed to show off your legs this summer? Well you're not alone. Varicose veins affect more than 30 million adults in the US between the ages of 18 to 70, with women twice as likely as men to develop the condition. They are often unattractive, uncomfortable and could cause further medical problems. [More]
Metal ions released by implant wear can damage progenitors of bone-forming cells

Metal ions released by implant wear can damage progenitors of bone-forming cells

In metal-on-metal pairings, both the shell and head of an implant consist of a cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy. The release of metal ions into the body has been reported as a result of implant wear. Bone loss (osteolysis) was observed in many cases. [More]
Marketing authorisation for Penthrox handheld inhaler issued in France

Marketing authorisation for Penthrox handheld inhaler issued in France

Mundipharma International Limited today announced that Penthrox has been granted marketing authorisation in France for the emergency relief of moderate to severe pain in conscious adult patients with trauma and associated pain. [More]
Simple model can help predict complication risks after surgery for CSM

Simple model can help predict complication risks after surgery for CSM

A simple model consisting of four risk factors can help surgeons to predict the risk of complications after surgery for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM)—a common condition causing compression of the spinal cord in the neck, reports a study in the July issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons, published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
Drexel University researchers aim to identify new molecular mechanisms involved in chronic pain

Drexel University researchers aim to identify new molecular mechanisms involved in chronic pain

Chronic pain is one of the most prevalent, disabling and expensive public health crises in the United States. It affects more than 100 million Americans, with annual costs estimated at $635 billion, says a 2014 report from the American Pain Society. [More]
Researchers play crucial role in crafting diagnostic criteria for functional GI disorders

Researchers play crucial role in crafting diagnostic criteria for functional GI disorders

With no laboratory test available to diagnose functional gastrointestinal disorders, proper diagnostic criteria are critical for clinicians to make an accurate determination of what ails their patients. [More]
Single, short duration exposure of general anesthesia appears to cause no cognitive harm in healthy, young children

Single, short duration exposure of general anesthesia appears to cause no cognitive harm in healthy, young children

A recent study concluded that very young, healthy children undergoing short surgical procedures requiring a single exposure to general anesthesia did not exhibit any effect on the cognitive outcomes tested, according to SmartTots, a public-private partnership of the International Anesthesia Research Society and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. [More]
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