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Timely diagnosis and treatment important to combat juvenile arthritis

Timely diagnosis and treatment important to combat juvenile arthritis

Most people associate arthritis with aging, but the fact is, one in 1,000 children is diagnosed with juvenile arthritis. [More]
Minister Ambrose calls for proposals to tackle prescription drug abuse

Minister Ambrose calls for proposals to tackle prescription drug abuse

The Honourable Rona Ambrose, Minister of Health, today issued a national Call for Proposals to improve the prescribing practices for prescription drugs that have a high risk of abuse or addiction. [More]
Massage therapy can alleviate symptoms of multiple sclerosis

Massage therapy can alleviate symptoms of multiple sclerosis

An estimated 2.3 million people worldwide live with multiple sclerosis (MS) each day, a debilitating disease that can often cause severe pain, muscle spasms, poor circulation, anxiety, stress and clinical depression. [More]
Trials show immunizations are effective in adults

Trials show immunizations are effective in adults

As kids prepare to head back to school, required immunizations are typically on the to-do list, but getting potentially lifesaving vaccines should not end when adulthood begins, says one University of Alabama at Birmingham infectious diseases expert. [More]

Bay Area Pain Medical Associates issues notification related to security, protection of medical records

On May 19, 2014, the medical office of Bay Area Pain Medical Associates was broken into and many items were stolen including three desktop computers. [More]
Study investigates ventilation strategies used during anaesthesia given for abdomen surgery

Study investigates ventilation strategies used during anaesthesia given for abdomen surgery

A multi-centre study at 30 centres across Europe, North and South America involving a total of 900 test subjects has investigated various ventilation strategies currently used during anaesthesia given for surgical procedures involving the abdomen to see just how effective they are. [More]
Clinical judgement with ECG and blood test effective in reducing hospital admissions for chest pain

Clinical judgement with ECG and blood test effective in reducing hospital admissions for chest pain

Clinical judgement, combined with an electrocardiogram (ECG) and blood test on arrival, is effective in reducing unnecessary hospital admissions for chest pain, a new study shows. [More]
FDA issues Complete Response Letter for AcelRx's Zalviso NDA

FDA issues Complete Response Letter for AcelRx's Zalviso NDA

AcelRx Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a specialty pharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of innovative therapies for the treatment of acute and breakthrough pain, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a Complete Response Letter (CRL) for the Company's new drug application (NDA) for Zalviso (sufentanil sublingual tablet system). [More]
EMA recommends full marketing approval for IMBRUVICA in the European Union

EMA recommends full marketing approval for IMBRUVICA in the European Union

Pharmacyclics, Inc. today announced that the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use of the European Medicines Agency issued a positive opinion recommending the granting of full marketing approval for IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) in the European Union. [More]
Longer looks: the economics of infertility; placebos as treatment raises ethical dilemmas

Longer looks: the economics of infertility; placebos as treatment raises ethical dilemmas

About a decade ago, Medicaid programs were struggling to keep up with skyrocketing prescription drug costs. Between 1997 and 2002, drug spending in the program for low-income Americans grew by about 20 percent annually. ... Medicaid directors began looking for ways to tamp down on those costs. One of the most popular policies was something called "prior authorization" for a new wave of more expensive, anti-psychotic drugs ,... These policies, in a sense, worked: they helped rein in how much Medicaid spent filling prescriptions. But in another sense, they may not have worked at all: a growing body of research has begun questioning whether restricting drug spending may have just shifted costs elsewhere -; particularly, into the prison system (Sarah Kliff, 7/22). [More]
Phase 3 trial: NEXAVAR tablets fail to meet primary endpoint in HER2-negative breast cancer patients

Phase 3 trial: NEXAVAR tablets fail to meet primary endpoint in HER2-negative breast cancer patients

Bayer HealthCare and Onyx Pharmaceuticals Inc., an Amgen subsidiary, today announced that an investigational Phase 3 trial of NEXAVAR (sorafenib) tablets in patients with advanced breast cancer did not meet its primary endpoint of improving progression-free survival (PFS). [More]
Highlights: Texas abortion rates falls dramatically; start-up problems for Virginia's psychiatric reforms

Highlights: Texas abortion rates falls dramatically; start-up problems for Virginia's psychiatric reforms

A four-month-old psychiatric-bed registry that is supposed to provide up-to-the-minute information for Virginians who need emergency mental health treatment is being updated as seldom as once a day, state officials told a panel of lawmakers this week (Shin, 7/22). [More]
Paracetamol fails to beat placebo at relieving back pain

Paracetamol fails to beat placebo at relieving back pain

Paracetamol is no more effective than placebo at relieving acute lower back pain, according to new clinical trial results. [More]
Lyfebulb, Immune collaborate to increase awareness of bullous pemphigoid

Lyfebulb, Immune collaborate to increase awareness of bullous pemphigoid

Lyfebulb, the International Pemphigus Pemphigoid Foundation (IPPF) and Immune Pharmaceuticals Inc., announced a collaboration to increase awareness of unmet needs in treating bullous pemphigoid last night at an event attended by more than sixty patients, physicians, scientists and other interested parties. [More]
Brown recluse spider bites increases this summer, say toxicologists

Brown recluse spider bites increases this summer, say toxicologists

Vanderbilt medical toxicologists are reporting an increase in patients seen with brown recluse spider bites this summer. [More]
Research suggests effective role for natural steroid hormones in treating breast cancer

Research suggests effective role for natural steroid hormones in treating breast cancer

A new study supports a growing body of research suggesting a safe and effective role for natural steroid hormones in treating postmenopausal breast cancer, with fewer detrimental side effects and improved health profile than with standard anti-hormone therapies. [More]

National Pain Week: NPS MedicineWise advises people on how to manage pain

This National Pain Week (21 – 27 July 2014), NPS MedicineWise is urging people living with pain to know how to use pain relieving medicines safely, and to have a conversation with their health professional about both the type and dose of pain relief medicine that are right for them. [More]
Increased number of Americans infected with chikungunya, say researchers

Increased number of Americans infected with chikungunya, say researchers

In just two weeks, the number of Americans infected with the mosquito-borne virus chikungunya has almost doubled and the virus has now been found in mosquitoes in the United States, something that is very concerning to a Kansas State University professor who is a leading researcher of the virus. [More]
FDA approves Targiniq ER to treat severe pain

FDA approves Targiniq ER to treat severe pain

Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Targiniq ER (oxycodone hydrochloride and naloxone hydrochloride extended-release tablets), an extended-release/long-acting (ER/LA) opioid analgesic to treat pain severe enough to require daily, around-the-clock, long-term opioid treatment and for which alternative treatment options are inadequate. [More]
Capsazepine shows dramatic tumor shrinkage without damaging surrounding tissues

Capsazepine shows dramatic tumor shrinkage without damaging surrounding tissues

Mouse models of human oral cancer treated with an agent called capsazepine showed dramatic tumor shrinkage without damage to surrounding tissues, researchers from the School of Dentistry and School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio found. [More]