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Autism Speaks grants $1M to Children's Hospital Los Angeles to improve GI symptoms associated with ASD

Autism Speaks grants $1M to Children's Hospital Los Angeles to improve GI symptoms associated with ASD

Pat Levitt, PhD, Simms/Mann Chair in Developmental Neurogenetics at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, has received a grant of nearly $1 million from Autism Speaks, the world's leading autism science and advocacy organization. [More]
Medicinal plant market goes untested for health hazards, shows study

Medicinal plant market goes untested for health hazards, shows study

Medicinal plant market goes untested for health hazards, according to a recent study published in journal Fungal Biology [More]
State highlights: Health care takes center stage in debates in Maine, Arizona, Missouri

State highlights: Health care takes center stage in debates in Maine, Arizona, Missouri

The three candidates for governor clashed Tuesday in their final debate, highlighting their differences on a wide range of issues, including health care and welfare. Partisan sparks flew early and often between Republican Gov. Paul LePage and Democratic U.S. Rep. Mike Michaud, who are running in a dead heat in the race, far ahead of independent Eliot Cutler, two weeks before Maine residents go to the polls (10/21). [More]
HRQoL goals may improve outcome in PAH

HRQoL goals may improve outcome in PAH

Health-related quality of life before and during treatment for pulmonary arterial hypertension is significantly associated with survival, Brazilian researchers report. [More]
Analgesics, anti-inflammatory drugs have beneficial effect on treatment of depression

Analgesics, anti-inflammatory drugs have beneficial effect on treatment of depression

Ordinary over the counter painkillers and anti-inflammatory drugs purchased from pharmacies may also be effective in the treatment of people suffering of depression. [More]
Novel way for treating non-cardiac chest pain due to esophageal hypersensitivity

Novel way for treating non-cardiac chest pain due to esophageal hypersensitivity

Chest pain doesn't necessarily come from the heart. An estimated 200,000 Americans each year experience non-cardiac chest pain, which in addition to pain can involve painful swallowing, discomfort and anxiety. Non-cardiac chest pain can be frightening for patients and result in visits to the emergency room because the painful symptoms, while often originating in the esophagus, can mimic a heart attack. [More]
Omeros provides update on OMS824 for treatment of schizophrenia, Huntington's disease

Omeros provides update on OMS824 for treatment of schizophrenia, Huntington's disease

Omeros Corporation today provided an update on OMS824, the company's phosphodiesterase 10 (PDE10) inhibitor in development for the treatment of schizophrenia and Huntington's disease. [More]
Buprenorphine maintenance therapy better than detoxification for treating prescription opioid dependence

Buprenorphine maintenance therapy better than detoxification for treating prescription opioid dependence

For treating patients with prescription opioid dependence in primary care, buprenorphine maintenance therapy is superior to detoxification, according to a new study by Yale School of Medicine researchers published in the Oct. 20 issue of JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]
Researchers unravel separate biological responses of the eye to blue light

Researchers unravel separate biological responses of the eye to blue light

Blue light can both set the mood and set in motion important biological responses. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania's School of Medicine and School of Arts and Sciences have teased apart the separate biological responses of the human eye to blue light, revealing an unexpected contest for control. [More]
UB study: Males with IBS experience more interpersonal difficulties than females

UB study: Males with IBS experience more interpersonal difficulties than females

One of the few studies to examine gender differences among patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has found that males with the condition experience more interpersonal difficulties than do females with the condition. [More]
IOF data shows 93% of US adults are unaware of men’s susceptibility to osteoporosis

IOF data shows 93% of US adults are unaware of men’s susceptibility to osteoporosis

New survey findings released by the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) for World Osteoporosis Day show that on average, 93 percent of nearly 1,200 adults surveyed are unaware how common osteoporotic fractures are in men. [More]
RegeneRx to begin RGN-259 Phase 3 trials for treatment of neurotrophic keratopathy

RegeneRx to begin RGN-259 Phase 3 trials for treatment of neurotrophic keratopathy

RegeneRx Biopharmaceuticals, Inc. ("the Company" or "RegeneRx") today announced that it met with the FDA in September and as a result of the meeting may begin Phase 3 to evaluate RGN-259 preservative-free eye drops for the treatment of patients with neurotrophic keratopathy (NK), an orphan disease of the cornea. [More]
Qualified massage therapist can play key role in improving cardiovascular health

Qualified massage therapist can play key role in improving cardiovascular health

Many already view massage as an important approach to relieving muscle pain or as a means to relax. However, working with a qualified massage therapist can also play a significant role in improving cardiovascular health as evidenced by a growing body of research, according to the American Massage Therapy Association. [More]
Boston Scientific starts PLATINUM Diversity trial to evaluate Promus PREMIER Stent System

Boston Scientific starts PLATINUM Diversity trial to evaluate Promus PREMIER Stent System

As part of its commitment to innovation and improving patient outcomes, Boston Scientific Corporation has initiated the PLATINUM Diversity trial to evaluate the clinical performance of the Promus PREMIER Everolimus-Eluting Platinum Chromium Coronary Stent System in underserved patient populations, including women and people of color. [More]
Janssen announces submission of IMBRUVICA sNDA to FDA for WM treatment

Janssen announces submission of IMBRUVICA sNDA to FDA for WM treatment

Janssen Research & Development, LLC today announced the submission of a supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) for IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration by its strategic partner Pharmacyclics, Inc. [More]
Anaesthesia editorial challenges placenta's role in pre-eclampsia

Anaesthesia editorial challenges placenta's role in pre-eclampsia

Pre-eclampsia, the potentially deadly condition that affects pregnant women, may be caused by problems meeting the oxygen demands of the growing fetus, according to an editorial in the November issue of Anaesthesia, the journal of the Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland. [More]
Research roundup: Malpractice reforms and doctors' practice; Medicaid expansion's effect

Research roundup: Malpractice reforms and doctors' practice; Medicaid expansion's effect

Defensive medicine is considered by many to be a major source of wasteful medical spending in the United States. [More]
Genome Canada awards $6M grant to CAMH and Assurex Health

Genome Canada awards $6M grant to CAMH and Assurex Health

Assurex Health and Canada's Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) today announced they have received a $6 million grant from Genome Canada, an agency of the Canadian government, to study the benefits of genetic testing to guide medication decisions for patients with depression or schizophrenia. [More]
Inpatient palliative care can considerably reduce readmissions, hospital costs, shows study

Inpatient palliative care can considerably reduce readmissions, hospital costs, shows study

Palliative care provided in the hospital offers known clinical benefits, and a new study shows that inpatient palliative care can also significantly lower the cost of hospitalization and the rate of readmissions. [More]
Half-day educational program can help educate women on side effects of cancer prevention surgery

Half-day educational program can help educate women on side effects of cancer prevention surgery

More women are having ovary-removing surgery as a cancer prevention measure, but many are often unaware of sexual or psychological side effects of the procedure. A new study by researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute shows a half-day educational program can help successfully deal with these issues by educating women on how to address them. [More]