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Toxicology is the study of harmful interactions between chemical, physical, or biological agents and biological systems.

Johns Hopkins researchers create map of world's chemical landscape

Researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have created a map of the world's chemical landscape, a catalogue of 10,000 chemicals for which there is available safety data that they say can predict the toxicity of many of the 90,000 or more other substances in consumer products for which there is no such information. [More]
Molecular imaging and radiochemistry: the importance of instrumentation. An interview with Professor Björn Wängler

Molecular imaging and radiochemistry: the importance of instrumentation. An interview with Professor Björn Wängler

I’m Björn Wängler, Professor for Molecular Imaging and Radiochemistry at the medical faculty Mannheim of Heidelberg University. I’m a radiopharmaceutical chemist by background and completed my PhD in 2004 at the University of Mainz. [More]
Framework for improving chemical hazard assessment without animals

Framework for improving chemical hazard assessment without animals

A new paper published in Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology, co-authored by the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, calls for ongoing development and regulatory acceptance of adverse outcome pathways (AOPs), a framework for improving chemical hazard assessment by prioritizing modern test methods that reduce animal use. [More]
Researchers developing new methods to better analyze effects of e-cig flavorings

Researchers developing new methods to better analyze effects of e-cig flavorings

Faculty and student researchers at Rochester Institute of Technology's National Technical Institute for the Deaf are developing methods to better analyze the effects of flavorings used in electronic cigarettes (e-cigs). [More]
Auranofin drug could improve prognosis for ovarian cancer patients exhibiting BRCA1 deficiency

Auranofin drug could improve prognosis for ovarian cancer patients exhibiting BRCA1 deficiency

An anti-rheumatic drug could improve the prognosis for ovarian cancer patients exhibiting a deficiency of the DNA repair protein BRCA1, a study suggests. [More]
E-cigarettes share similar short-term safety profile as Nicorette products

E-cigarettes share similar short-term safety profile as Nicorette products

A new study, published in the Journal of Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology, found that e-cigarettes share a similar short-term safety profile as Nicorette products and are comparable in reducing tobacco withdrawal symptoms. [More]
Scientists develop a method for cell replacement in diseased vessels

Scientists develop a method for cell replacement in diseased vessels

In industrialized countries, a particularly high number of people suffer from arteriosclerosis -- with fatal consequences: Deposits in the arteries lead to strokes and heart attacks. A team of researchers under the leadership of the University of Bonn has now developed a method for guiding replacement cells to diseased vascular segments using nanoparticles. [More]
Researchers suggest microorganisms in the womb set stage for health problems later in life

Researchers suggest microorganisms in the womb set stage for health problems later in life

Researchers review importance of microorganisms that exist in the gut, suggesting perturbation of the environment during pregnancy, delivery and early infancy could impact the developing baby's early microbiome and set the stage for health problems later in life. The term "microbiome" refers to the trillions of organisms we harbor, on our skin and within our respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. [More]
Medication poisoning threatens young children in poor areas

Medication poisoning threatens young children in poor areas

Children younger than 5 who live in economically disadvantaged areas had a greater risk of medication poisoning that resulted in referral to a health care facility, according to scientists at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health and the University of California, San Diego. These areas were rural and experienced high unemployment, along with lower rates of high school graduation and lower household income. [More]
Drugs approved for various conditions also have antibiotic properties

Drugs approved for various conditions also have antibiotic properties

A number of drugs already approved to treat parasitic infections, cancers, infertility and other conditions also show promise as antibiotic agents against staph and tuberculosis infections, according to a new study by University of Illinois chemists and collaborators. Because these agents act against multiple targets within the bacteria, it may be harder for bacteria to develop resistance. [More]

New article explores harmful algal blooms and their impact on public health, environment

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) occur naturally, but their outbreaks are influenced by climate change and droughts, nutrient enrichment and manmade factors, such as contaminants from sewage and stormwater discharge, natural resource extraction or agricultural runoff, to name a few. [More]
Recreational drug and alcohol use can increase risk of poisoning-related hospital admissions

Recreational drug and alcohol use can increase risk of poisoning-related hospital admissions

Poisonings from recreational drug and alcohol use account for 9 percent of all poisoning-related hospital admissions, says a new University of Sydney study revealing that males and people under 30 are at greatest risk. [More]
Many gene variants affect person's response to medication

Many gene variants affect person's response to medication

In recent decades much hope was based on the development of personalised drug treatments, in which genetic tests determine the choice and optimal dose of medication for each individual patient. However, the real breakthrough is still to be seen, and now researchers at Karolinska Institutet show in two separate scientific papers that many more gene variants affect how a person responds to medication than previously thought - and thus that today's analytical tools are too coarse. [More]
Bile acid may help treat fatty liver disease and obesity

Bile acid may help treat fatty liver disease and obesity

A bile acid that can turn off a receptor in the gut has prevented and reversed fatty liver disease in mice, according to an international team of researchers. The compound may help treat certain metabolic disorders, such as Type 2 diabetes and obesity, as well. [More]
VCU Massey Cancer Center scientists reveal signaling process that leads to excessive growth of cancer

VCU Massey Cancer Center scientists reveal signaling process that leads to excessive growth of cancer

The gene p53 has been described as the "guardian of the genome" due to its prominent role in preventing genetic mutations. More than half of all cancers are thought to originate from p53 mutations or loss of function, and now a recent study by VCU Massey Cancer Center scientist Richard Moran, Ph.D., explains why. [More]
Palatin achieves patient enrollment target in pivotal phase 3 studies of bremelanotide for FSD treatment

Palatin achieves patient enrollment target in pivotal phase 3 studies of bremelanotide for FSD treatment

Palatin Technologies, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company developing targeted, receptor-specific peptide therapeutics for the treatment of diseases with significant unmet medical needs and commercial potential, today announced it has achieved its patient enrollment target in its two pivotal phase 3 clinical studies of bremelanotide for the treatment of female sexual dysfunction (FSD). [More]

Researchers evaluate contaminants in community garden soils in New York City

While community gardens provide benefits including urban green space, opportunities for recreation, art expression, social gathering, and improved diets, urban gardening may also increase the opportunity for exposure to common urban soil contaminants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). [More]
Researchers reveal new technique to grow human hepatocytes in the laboratory

Researchers reveal new technique to grow human hepatocytes in the laboratory

In new research appearing in the prestigious journal Nature Biotechnology, an international research team led by The Hebrew University of Jerusalem describes a new technique for growing human hepatocytes in the laboratory. This groundbreaking development could help advance a variety of liver-related research and applications, from studying drug toxicity to creating bio-artificial liver support for patients awaiting transplantations. [More]
New test can detect drug abuse faster

New test can detect drug abuse faster

A new test for club drugs like ketamine can detect low levels of drugs in urine and plasma, making it faster, easier and cheaper to identify them. The authors of the study, published in Journal of Chromatography B, say it could give authorities the boost they need to keep up with trends drug (ab)use. [More]
Scientists show evidence for exchange of lactate between different brain cells

Scientists show evidence for exchange of lactate between different brain cells

Nerve cells cover their high energy demand with glucose and lactate. Scientists of the University of Zurich now provide new support for this. They show for the first time in the intact mouse brain evidence for an exchange of lactate between different brain cells. With this study they were able to confirm a 20-year old hypothesis. [More]
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