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Toxicology is the study of harmful interactions between chemical, physical, or biological agents and biological systems.

UL collaborates with renowned researchers to develop new tool that predicts chemical toxicity of substances

UL (Underwriters Laboratories), a global safety science company, announced today it is entering into a relationship with world-renown toxicologists and researchers to develop a cutting-edge tool to predict the toxicity of chemicals. [More]
Metabolomics research at the Phenome Centre Birmingham

Metabolomics research at the Phenome Centre Birmingham

The new Phenome Centre Birmingham is an eight-million-pound research facility that has been funded by the Medical Research Council, by the University of Birmingham, and by four industry partners, namely, Beckman Coulter, Bruker, ThermoFisher Scientific and Waters. It is a clinical phenotyping centre. [More]
ADD Program receives $19.5 million NIH contract to test drugs for treating epilepsy

ADD Program receives $19.5 million NIH contract to test drugs for treating epilepsy

The University of Utah College of Pharmacy's Anticonvulsant Drug Development Program has been awarded a five-year $19.5 million contract renewal with the National Institutes of Health to test drugs to treat epilepsy, and the major focus of the project is to address needs that affect millions of people worldwide -identify novel investigational compounds to prevent the development of epilepsy or to treat refractory, or drug-resistant, epilepsy. [More]
New technique for identifying illicit drugs can provide high sensitivity and rapid results

New technique for identifying illicit drugs can provide high sensitivity and rapid results

For the identification of illicit drugs in forensic toxicological casework, analysis can be delayed and potentially compromised due to lengthy sample preparation. However a new technique has been developed that can provide high sensitivity and fast results. [More]
Allergan, Amgen submit BLA for ABP 215 oncology biosimilar medicine to FDA

Allergan, Amgen submit BLA for ABP 215 oncology biosimilar medicine to FDA

Amgen and Allergan plc. today announced the submission of a Biologics License Application (BLA) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for ABP 215, a biosimilar candidate to Avastin (bevacizumab). [More]
Exposure to licorice compound disrupts steroid sex hormone production in ovary

Exposure to licorice compound disrupts steroid sex hormone production in ovary

A study of mouse reproductive tissues finds that exposure to isoliquiritigenin, a compound found in licorice, disrupts steroid sex hormone production in the ovary, researchers report. [More]
E-cigarette vapour does not induce DNA mutations linked to tobacco smoke exposures

E-cigarette vapour does not induce DNA mutations linked to tobacco smoke exposures

E-cigarette vapour does not induce DNA mutations commonly observed with tobacco smoke exposures in lab-based tests. [More]
Advances in POC diabetes testing: an interview with Gavin Jones

Advances in POC diabetes testing: an interview with Gavin Jones

Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is well recognized as a reliable measure for glycemic control. The role of HbA1c testing in the management of patients with diabetes has been well established for several decades. HbA1c levels reflect the average circulating glucose concentration over the lifespan of... [More]
Study finds increasing incidence of hospitalizations for prescription opioid poisonings in children and teens

Study finds increasing incidence of hospitalizations for prescription opioid poisonings in children and teens

The overall incidence of hospitalizations for prescription opioid poisonings in children and adolescents has more than doubled from 1997 to 2012, with increasing incidence of poisonings attributed to suicide or self-inflicted injury and accidental intent, according to a new study published online by JAMA Pediatrics. [More]
Nano-biointeraction and nanopathology

Nano-biointeraction and nanopathology

Nanoparticles enter the organism in a number of ways. In most cases through inhalation and ingestion. When inhaled, the majority of them are expelled with the next breath. When ingested, most of them are gotten rid of through feces. [More]
IU scientists find evidence for link between prostate cancer and Ewing's sarcoma

IU scientists find evidence for link between prostate cancer and Ewing's sarcoma

Medical researchers at Indiana University Bloomington have found evidence for a link between prostate cancer, which affects millions of men age 50 and older, and Ewing's sarcoma, a rare form of cancer that affects children and young adults. [More]
New study raises serious safety concerns in clinical use of caspase inhibitors for liver injury

New study raises serious safety concerns in clinical use of caspase inhibitors for liver injury

Many acute and chronic liver diseases, including alcoholic hepatitis, result from apoptotic (programmed) cell death mediated by the enzyme caspase. [More]
Exposure to e-cigarette vapour induces negligible or no oxidative damage to lung epithelial cells

Exposure to e-cigarette vapour induces negligible or no oxidative damage to lung epithelial cells

E-cigarette vapour is much less harmful to lung cells than cigarette smoke. Lab tests show that, unlike tobacco smoke, which causes oxidative stress and cell death, e-cigarette vapour does not. Oxidative stress and cell death are driving factors in the development of many smoking-related diseases such as COPD and lung cancer. [More]
Prescription sleep aids may stimulate suicidal thoughts or actions

Prescription sleep aids may stimulate suicidal thoughts or actions

Prescription sleep aids appear to carry a rare risk of suicide, most typically when they cause the unexpected response of stimulating rather than quietening patients, researchers say. [More]
Blocking production of key receptor may reduce effects of cigarette smoke toxicity, study finds

Blocking production of key receptor may reduce effects of cigarette smoke toxicity, study finds

A Duke University-led study shows how exposure to the particulate matter from cigarette smoke may affect early development in zebrafish embryos and increases the risk of neurological disorders and physical deformities. [More]
Scientists develop new method to produce embryos from non-egg cells

Scientists develop new method to produce embryos from non-egg cells

Scientists have shown for the first time that embryos can be made from non-egg cells, a discovery that challenges two centuries of received wisdom. [More]
Researchers suggest need for human studies to examine effects of cannabinoid use during pregnancy

Researchers suggest need for human studies to examine effects of cannabinoid use during pregnancy

In this new era of legalized marijuana, far too little research has been conducted on the effect of cannabis on the development of human embryos, say researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center who scoured medical literature on the topic and found what they say is worrisome animal research. [More]

OECD publishes novel knowledge management tools for advancing non-animal testing methods

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development has recently published the first five adverse outcome pathways (AOP), three of which have been developed by the European Commission's science and knowledge service, the Joint Research Centre. [More]
DHA intake can prevent known trigger of lupus, study finds

DHA intake can prevent known trigger of lupus, study finds

A team of Michigan State University researchers has found that consuming an omega-3 fatty acid called DHA, or docosahexaenoic acid, can stop a known trigger of lupus and potentially other autoimmune disorders. [More]
Researchers develop new analytical capabilities to identify chemical forms of mercury in human hair

Researchers develop new analytical capabilities to identify chemical forms of mercury in human hair

Mercury is a potent neurotoxin present in our daily lives and our body can accumulate it over the years. Food consumption, such as fish and rice, is the most common source of mercury exposure. [More]
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