Toxicology News and Research RSS Feed - Toxicology News and Research

Toxicology is the study of harmful interactions between chemical, physical, or biological agents and biological systems.
Environmental toxins affect children's brain development, experts agree

Environmental toxins affect children's brain development, experts agree

An unprecedented alliance of leading scientists, health professionals, and children's and environmental health advocates agree for the first time that today's scientific evidence supports a link between exposures to toxic chemicals in air, water, food and everyday products and children's risks for neurodevelopmental disorders. [More]
KIT researchers develop 3D prostate model based on cryogels

KIT researchers develop 3D prostate model based on cryogels

A team of researchers led by Dr. Friederike J. Gruhl and Professor Andrew C. B. Cato at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology are developing a three-dimensional model for prostate cancer research based on cryogels. [More]
Mutant fruit flies provide insight into origins of Parkinson's disease

Mutant fruit flies provide insight into origins of Parkinson's disease

The neurodegeneration that occurs in Parkinson’s disease is a result of stress on the endoplasmic reticulum in the cell rather than failure of the mitochondria as previously thought, according to a study in fruit flies. [More]
Researchers use wristband sensors to detect how opioid users in emergency room reacted to dosages

Researchers use wristband sensors to detect how opioid users in emergency room reacted to dosages

There is merit in looking at the use of wearable biosensors to detect whether opioid users stay focused on their rehabilitation programs. [More]
Metal ions released by implant wear can damage progenitors of bone-forming cells

Metal ions released by implant wear can damage progenitors of bone-forming cells

In metal-on-metal pairings, both the shell and head of an implant consist of a cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy. The release of metal ions into the body has been reported as a result of implant wear. Bone loss (osteolysis) was observed in many cases. [More]
Hops show promise in reducing breast cancer risk

Hops show promise in reducing breast cancer risk

Hops, the flower cones used in beer-making, are also found in dietary supplements designed to help treat post-menopausal symptoms and other conditions. Scientists are now investigating whether an extract from the plant could also help fend off breast cancer. [More]
Highly efficient bacterial agent could improve treatment of Wilson disease

Highly efficient bacterial agent could improve treatment of Wilson disease

In the 'Journal of Clinical Investigation', scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München describe a small peptide that very efficiently binds excess copper from liver cells. This molecule comes from a bacterium's bag of tricks and could be suitable for treating Wilson disease. [More]
E-cigarette use modifies gene expression important for upper airway immune defense

E-cigarette use modifies gene expression important for upper airway immune defense

When we smoke cigarettes, dozens of genes important for immune defense are altered in the epithelial cells that line the respiratory tract. Several of these changes likely increase the risk of bacterial infections, viruses, and inflammation. [More]
Scientists study fundamentals of tumour surveillance by immune system in mice models

Scientists study fundamentals of tumour surveillance by immune system in mice models

The body's defences detect and eliminate not only pathogens but also tumour cells. Natural killer cells (NK-Cells) are specifically activated by chemical messengers, the Cytokines, to seek and destroy tumour cells. [More]
Endocrine Society members advocate science-based policies to address danger of EDCs

Endocrine Society members advocate science-based policies to address danger of EDCs

To protect human health, Endocrine Society members called on the European Commission to adopt science-based policies for regulating endocrine-disrupting chemicals in an opinion piece published today in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology. [More]
Tackling healthcare challenges in a changing world: an interview with Professor Jeremy Nicholson

Tackling healthcare challenges in a changing world: an interview with Professor Jeremy Nicholson

As individuals and as populations our risks of getting diseases are determined partly genetically and partly from the environment that we live in. An important part of that environment that mediates between the outside world and the inside world of our bodies is the microbiome. [More]
Metabolite of oral DMF drug for multiple sclerosis appears to slow onset of Parkinson's disease

Metabolite of oral DMF drug for multiple sclerosis appears to slow onset of Parkinson's disease

The metabolite of a drug that is helping patients battle multiple sclerosis appears to significantly slow the onset of Parkinson's disease, researchers say. [More]
New IRAP inhibitors may hold promise for improving cognitive functions in animal models

New IRAP inhibitors may hold promise for improving cognitive functions in animal models

Researchers have discovered three new inhibitors of insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP), compounds shown to improve cognitive functions in animal models of human disorders. [More]
Cell phone radiation exposure may lead to increased rates of rare cancers

Cell phone radiation exposure may lead to increased rates of rare cancers

According to new report from Microwave News, the U.S. National Toxicology Program has found increased rates of rare cancers of the heart and brain in animals exposed to cell phone radiation in a long-awaited multi-million dollar two-year study. [More]
Nutrition, safety tips for grilling season

Nutrition, safety tips for grilling season

Cooking meat, including beef, pork, fish, or poultry, with high-temperature methods such as pan frying or grilling directly over an open flame can increase exposure to chemicals that can cause changes in DNA that may increase the risk of cancer, according to the National Cancer Institute. [More]
Scientists find ketamine as effective sedative for treating highly-agitated patients prior to hospitalisation

Scientists find ketamine as effective sedative for treating highly-agitated patients prior to hospitalisation

Scientists have shown that ketamine is far more effective than the more commonly used haloperidol for treating highly-agitated patients prior to hospitalisation. [More]
Conventional repeated radiation treatments may offer no major benefit to brain tumor patients

Conventional repeated radiation treatments may offer no major benefit to brain tumor patients

A new study shows that repeated radiation therapy used to target tumors in the brain may not be as safe to healthy brain cells as previously assumed. [More]
Novel therapeutic approach to treat leukaemia patients

Novel therapeutic approach to treat leukaemia patients

Cancer cells have an abnormal cell division and survival machinery - they grow faster than they die. For their permanent development, they produce an excess of growth factors and nutrients and block the body's own safety mechanisms. [More]
International study shows direct link between continued marijuana use during pregnancy and pre-term birth

International study shows direct link between continued marijuana use during pregnancy and pre-term birth

International research led by the University of Adelaide has for the first time shown a direct link between continued marijuana use during pregnancy and pre-term birth. [More]
Researchers develop novel ss-siRNAs to turn off disease-related genes

Researchers develop novel ss-siRNAs to turn off disease-related genes

Combining the therapeutic potential and advantages of existing oligonucleotide-based approaches to turn off disease-related genes, a type of single-stranded silencing RNAs (ss-siRNAs) has shown significantly improved potency and activity. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement