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Toxicology is the study of harmful interactions between chemical, physical, or biological agents and biological systems.
Genetic mutations in liver cells may drive tumor formation in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

Genetic mutations in liver cells may drive tumor formation in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

Two genetic mutations in liver cells may drive tumor formation in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (iCCA), the second most common form of liver cancer, according to a research published in the July issue of the journal Nature. [More]
A*STAR scientists pioneered a molecular connection between obesity and diabetes

A*STAR scientists pioneered a molecular connection between obesity and diabetes

Scientists from the Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, a research institute under the Agency for Science, Technology and Research, have discovered that obese individuals lack a protein that is essential for regulating blood glucose levels, causing them to face higher risks of developing diabetes. [More]
INTEGRA introduces Row Dilution Plate Holder accessory for VIAFLO 96 and 384 handheld benchtop pipettes

INTEGRA introduces Row Dilution Plate Holder accessory for VIAFLO 96 and 384 handheld benchtop pipettes

INTEGRA has introduced a Row Dilution Plate Holder accessory for its VIAFLO 96 and 384 handheld benchtop pipettes. [More]
Study measures hazardous concentrations of carbon monoxide on houseboats

Study measures hazardous concentrations of carbon monoxide on houseboats

Boaters and marina workers should exercise caution this summer before taking to the seas. A study published online in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene (JOEH) outlines hazards posed by carbon monoxide levels on houseboats that use gasoline-powered generators without emission controls, along with controls that are available to reduce exposure to carbon monoxide from the generators. [More]
EnGeneIC plans for Phase 2a trial of EGFR-targeted doxorubicin-packaged EDV nanocells for GBM

EnGeneIC plans for Phase 2a trial of EGFR-targeted doxorubicin-packaged EDV nanocells for GBM

EnGeneIC, Ltd., an emerging biopharmaceutical company focused on revolutionizing the treatment of cancer through the targeted delivery of therapeutic agents directly to cancer cells, today announced plans to move forward with a Phase 2a clinical trial in the U.S. using its formulation of EGFR-targeted, EDV nanocells packaged with doxorubicin for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma (GBM), a common and aggressive type of brain tumor. [More]
Small antioxidant molecules suppress colon cancer associated with colitis

Small antioxidant molecules suppress colon cancer associated with colitis

Researchers from Case Western Reserve and Dartmouth universities have shown that a class of small antioxidant molecules carries enormous promise for supressing colon cancer associated with colitis. [More]
Artificial sweetener have potential to limit impact of therapeutic drugs

Artificial sweetener have potential to limit impact of therapeutic drugs

One of the active ingredients in a popular artificial sweetener could have the potential to limit the impact of therapeutic drugs, reduce the number and balance of beneficial bacteria in the gut and alter hormone secretion, according to an article published in Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Part A: Current Issues. [More]
University of Kentucky receives $12.2 million grant to reduce negative health from hazardous chemicals

University of Kentucky receives $12.2 million grant to reduce negative health from hazardous chemicals

The University of Kentucky has received a $12.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to continue its work to better understand and minimize negative health and environmental impacts from hazardous waste sites. [More]
Novel microscopy technology helps detect protein that plays key role in prostate cancer

Novel microscopy technology helps detect protein that plays key role in prostate cancer

Assemblies of proteins, known as protein complexes, have important functions in cells; protein complexes embedded in the cell membrane, for example, are responsible for the exchange with the extracellular environment. [More]
Synthetic, Enterome partner to study effects of beta-lactam antibiotics on gastrointestinal microflora

Synthetic, Enterome partner to study effects of beta-lactam antibiotics on gastrointestinal microflora

Synthetic Biologics, Inc., a developer of novel anti-infective biologic and drug candidates targeting specific pathogens that cause serious infections and diseases, and Enterome Bioscience SA, a pioneer in the development of innovative disease management solutions based on a deep understanding of the gut microbiome, today announced that they have entered into an agreement to conduct metagenomic research on the effects of beta-lactam antibiotics on the gastrointestinal microflora (microbiome) of human patients. [More]
Penn researchers awarded $10 million grant to study adverse health effects, remediation of asbestos

Penn researchers awarded $10 million grant to study adverse health effects, remediation of asbestos

Researchers at the Center of Excellence in Environmental Toxicology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, have been awarded a $10 million grant from the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences over the next four years to study asbestos exposure pathways that lead to mesothelioma, the bioremediation of this hazardous material, and mechanisms that lead to asbestos-related diseases. [More]
Thrasos presents positive results of THR-184 compound for treatment of acute kidney injury

Thrasos presents positive results of THR-184 compound for treatment of acute kidney injury

Thrasos Therapeutics, a biotherapeutics company focused on delivering new solutions for kidney disease, today presented preclinical results showing that its lead development compound THR-184 can effectively protect against loss of kidney function following acute ischemic injury in rat. [More]
Syngene International, Bristol-Myers Squibb extend drug discovery and development collaboration

Syngene International, Bristol-Myers Squibb extend drug discovery and development collaboration

Bristol-Myers Squibb and Syngene International, India's largest contract research organization, today announced a five-year extension of their drug discovery and development collaboration in India. [More]
P2Y12 and blood clotting: an interview with Dr. Jacobson, NIH

P2Y12 and blood clotting: an interview with Dr. Jacobson, NIH

We already understand the many steps involved in blood clotting in great mechanistic detail. The process of blood vessels closing off in response to injury is necessary for preserving life, but blood platelets that are over-active, or activated inappropriately because of unstable plaque, can lead to heart attacks and strokes. [More]
Compound in saliva may protect from toxins in tea, coffee and liquid smoke flavoring

Compound in saliva may protect from toxins in tea, coffee and liquid smoke flavoring

A compound in saliva, along with common proteins in blood and muscle, may protect human cells from powerful toxins in tea, coffee and liquid smoke flavoring, according to results of a new study led by investigators at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center. [More]
Compound in saliva and proteins in blood may protect human cells from powerful toxins in tea, coffee

Compound in saliva and proteins in blood may protect human cells from powerful toxins in tea, coffee

A compound in saliva, along with common proteins in blood and muscle, may protect human cells from powerful toxins in tea, coffee and liquid smoke flavoring, according to results of a new study led by investigators at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center. [More]
Researchers find link between aging and chemicals in environment

Researchers find link between aging and chemicals in environment

Why are some 75-year-olds downright spry while others can barely get around? Part of the explanation, say researchers writing in the Cell Press journal Trends in Molecular Medicine on May 28, is differences from one person to the next in exposure to harmful substances in the environment, chemicals such as benzene, cigarette smoke, and even stress. [More]
The future of high throughput screening: an interview with Mark Wigglesworth, Director High Throughput Screening, AstraZeneca

The future of high throughput screening: an interview with Mark Wigglesworth, Director High Throughput Screening, AstraZeneca

Quoting Mike Snowden (VP & Head of Discovery Sciences, AstraZeneca), “it’s where biology meets chemistry”. It’s where for the first time a target protein can be probed for novel molecules that modulate its function, of course we want to do this to prove a hypothesis that these proteins are drug targets with the potential to deliver innovative medicines. [More]
UH pharmacy students earn awards for excellence in leadership, professional service and clinical skills from TSHP

UH pharmacy students earn awards for excellence in leadership, professional service and clinical skills from TSHP

University of Houston (UH) pharmacy students wrapped up the spring semester with a round of awards for excellence in leadership, professional service and clinical skills. [More]
Tel Aviv University pinpoints mechanism that causes rare and severe congenital syndrome

Tel Aviv University pinpoints mechanism that causes rare and severe congenital syndrome

In the 1950s and 1960s, pregnant women with morning sickness were often prescribed the new drug thalidomide. Shortly after the medicine was released on the market, a reported 10,000 infants were born with an extreme form of the rare congenital phocomelia syndrome, which caused death in 50 percent of cases and severe physical and mental disabilities in others. [More]