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Toxicology is the study of harmful interactions between chemical, physical, or biological agents and biological systems.
E-cigarette use modifies gene expression important for upper airway immune defense

E-cigarette use modifies gene expression important for upper airway immune defense

When we smoke cigarettes, dozens of genes important for immune defense are altered in the epithelial cells that line the respiratory tract. Several of these changes likely increase the risk of bacterial infections, viruses, and inflammation. [More]
Scientists study fundamentals of tumour surveillance by immune system in mice models

Scientists study fundamentals of tumour surveillance by immune system in mice models

The body's defences detect and eliminate not only pathogens but also tumour cells. Natural killer cells (NK-Cells) are specifically activated by chemical messengers, the Cytokines, to seek and destroy tumour cells. [More]
Endocrine Society members advocate science-based policies to address danger of EDCs

Endocrine Society members advocate science-based policies to address danger of EDCs

To protect human health, Endocrine Society members called on the European Commission to adopt science-based policies for regulating endocrine-disrupting chemicals in an opinion piece published today in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology. [More]
Tackling healthcare challenges in a changing world: an interview with Professor Jeremy Nicholson

Tackling healthcare challenges in a changing world: an interview with Professor Jeremy Nicholson

As individuals and as populations our risks of getting diseases are determined partly genetically and partly from the environment that we live in. An important part of that environment that mediates between the outside world and the inside world of our bodies is the microbiome. [More]
Metabolite of oral DMF drug for multiple sclerosis appears to slow onset of Parkinson's disease

Metabolite of oral DMF drug for multiple sclerosis appears to slow onset of Parkinson's disease

The metabolite of a drug that is helping patients battle multiple sclerosis appears to significantly slow the onset of Parkinson's disease, researchers say. [More]
New IRAP inhibitors may hold promise for improving cognitive functions in animal models

New IRAP inhibitors may hold promise for improving cognitive functions in animal models

Researchers have discovered three new inhibitors of insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP), compounds shown to improve cognitive functions in animal models of human disorders. [More]
Cell phone radiation exposure may lead to increased rates of rare cancers

Cell phone radiation exposure may lead to increased rates of rare cancers

According to new report from Microwave News, the U.S. National Toxicology Program has found increased rates of rare cancers of the heart and brain in animals exposed to cell phone radiation in a long-awaited multi-million dollar two-year study. [More]
Nutrition, safety tips for grilling season

Nutrition, safety tips for grilling season

Cooking meat, including beef, pork, fish, or poultry, with high-temperature methods such as pan frying or grilling directly over an open flame can increase exposure to chemicals that can cause changes in DNA that may increase the risk of cancer, according to the National Cancer Institute. [More]
Scientists find ketamine as effective sedative for treating highly-agitated patients prior to hospitalisation

Scientists find ketamine as effective sedative for treating highly-agitated patients prior to hospitalisation

Scientists have shown that ketamine is far more effective than the more commonly used haloperidol for treating highly-agitated patients prior to hospitalisation. [More]
Conventional repeated radiation treatments may offer no major benefit to brain tumor patients

Conventional repeated radiation treatments may offer no major benefit to brain tumor patients

A new study shows that repeated radiation therapy used to target tumors in the brain may not be as safe to healthy brain cells as previously assumed. [More]
Novel therapeutic approach to treat leukaemia patients

Novel therapeutic approach to treat leukaemia patients

Cancer cells have an abnormal cell division and survival machinery - they grow faster than they die. For their permanent development, they produce an excess of growth factors and nutrients and block the body's own safety mechanisms. [More]
International study shows direct link between continued marijuana use during pregnancy and pre-term birth

International study shows direct link between continued marijuana use during pregnancy and pre-term birth

International research led by the University of Adelaide has for the first time shown a direct link between continued marijuana use during pregnancy and pre-term birth. [More]
Researchers develop novel ss-siRNAs to turn off disease-related genes

Researchers develop novel ss-siRNAs to turn off disease-related genes

Combining the therapeutic potential and advantages of existing oligonucleotide-based approaches to turn off disease-related genes, a type of single-stranded silencing RNAs (ss-siRNAs) has shown significantly improved potency and activity. [More]
High-throughput screening can help detect multiple compounds with potent antimicrobial activity

High-throughput screening can help detect multiple compounds with potent antimicrobial activity

A new study in which researchers rapidly screened more than 11,000 bioactive molecules for activity against an antibiotic-resistant strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteria identified multiple compounds with potent antimicrobial activity. [More]
Thermo Fisher Scientific reinforces ongoing commitment to make advanced technologies more accessible to customers

Thermo Fisher Scientific reinforces ongoing commitment to make advanced technologies more accessible to customers

Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc., the world leader in serving science, today reinforced its ongoing commitment to help its customers accelerate innovation and enhance productivity. [More]
UCLA study shows anti-nausea drug does not increase risk of birth defects

UCLA study shows anti-nausea drug does not increase risk of birth defects

Women suffering from extreme morning sickness often take Zofran (ondansetron) to combat their debilitating nausea and vomiting. However, two studies have found that the drug may increase risk of heart defects and cleft palate in children exposed in utero. [More]
Studies show mango consumption may contribute to protective health effects

Studies show mango consumption may contribute to protective health effects

Four new studies surrounding the effects of mango consumption suggest this superfruit has the potential to help combat adverse effects associated with high fat diets and obesity (animal study), as well inhibit growth of fat cells (anti-lipogenic properties in an in-vivo study), slow advancement of breast cancer tumors (animal study), as well as improve regularity and decrease inflammation associated with constipation (human subject study). [More]
Study opens door for new opportunities in finding antidotes to nerve agent sarin

Study opens door for new opportunities in finding antidotes to nerve agent sarin

The nerve agent sarin causes a deadly overstimulation of the nervous system that can be stopped if treated with an antidote within minutes of poisoning. Today, a ground-breaking study has been published in PNAS, which in detail describes how such a drug works. Researchers at the Swedish Defence Research Agency, Umea University and in Germany are behind the study. [More]
Bonn researchers identify new technique to measure activity of brown fat cells

Bonn researchers identify new technique to measure activity of brown fat cells

Brown fat cells can burn fat to generate heat. University of Bonn researchers have discovered a new method to measure the activity of brown fat cells in humans and mice. The researchers showed that microRNA-92a can be used as an indirect measure for the activity of energy consuming brown fat cells. They showed that a small blood sample was sufficient. Results were published in "Nature Communications," a well-known scientific journal. [More]
Post-mortem toxicology screening has many phases

Post-mortem toxicology screening has many phases

Prince's autopsy was conducted by A. Quinn Strobl, MD, FCAP, a member of the College of American Pathologists. The results are expected to take at least two weeks, perhaps as many as six full weeks. This tragedy has people asking again "Why do toxicology results take so long?" [More]
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