Children with mild cognitive delays show modest or no improvement from early childhood to early grade school in their ability to interact with peers

Published on March 23, 2006 at 11:50 AM · No Comments

Children with mild cognitive delays show only modest or no improvement from early childhood to early grade school in their ability to interact with their peers, a worrisome situation given the importance of such relationships and their ability to contribute to other aspects of a child's development.

These findings come from researchers at the University of Washington in Seattle and are published in the March/April 2006 issue of the journal Child Development.

The researchers examined peer interactions in 63 four-to-six year-old children with mild developmental delays to evaluate their social interactions with other children. They then reevaluated them two years later. The children were observed during play sessions with a group of three children they didn't know who didn't have any developmental problems, but who were the same age and gender as the children with the delay. This task was important, because becoming involved in new groups is especially challenging. It requires many skills, including approaching peers, evaluating the context and resolving any potential conflicts.

The researchers found only very modest improvements in peer interactions for the delayed children over the two-year period. In fact, one subgroup of children showed no increases at all.

Read in | English | Español | Français | Deutsch | Português | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | 简体中文 | 繁體中文 | Nederlands | Finnish | עִבְרִית | Русский | Svenska | Polski
Comments
The opinions expressed here are the views of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of News-Medical.Net.
Post a new comment
Post