Single-sex education for girls

Picture a classroom. It doesn't matter what subject, or what grade level. Imagine the teacher asks a question of the class... and virtually every hand shoots right up into the air.

Virtually every student is eager to answer, enthusiastic about learning. This is a scene played out daily in the classrooms of National Coalition of Girls' Schools (NCGS -- http://www.ncgs.org) member schools. Girls' school classrooms are places where education is prized, where teachers feel empowered, where girls are excited about being in school.

Whether you are new to the girls' school community or a veteran member, the NCGS website offers a wealth of information to assist you in the important work of educating girls and young women. Our latest addition: excerpts from Volume 2 of 'What the Research Shows.' This popular publication concisely spells out the many benefits of single-sex education, examining academic studies, brain research and longstanding trends in single-sex education for girls.

In a statement accompanying the announcement, Whitney Ransome and Meg Milne Moulton, NCGS Co-Executive Directors, said:

"It's the combination of community, culture and climate that have made girls' schools so successful in transforming the lives of young women. Expectations are set high, opportunities abound, role models are plentiful, and accomplishment is a value cherished at every level. So it's no surprise that single-sex education for girls has become such a prominent feature of today's educational landscape. The research -- as well as the history of achievement -- is there to back it up."

NCGS is the leading expert on single-sex education for girls, representing 114 all-girl schools across the United States plus international members and affiliates in Canada, Great Britain, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa. Our member schools reflect the full diversity of today's educational landscape: private, public, and charter... day and boarding... urban, suburban and rural... big and small. In the U.S. alone, more than 48,000 girls and young women attend NCGS member schools.

Posted in: Women's Health News

Tags: ,

Advertisement

Comments

The opinions expressed here are the views of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of News-Medical.Net.
Post a new comment
Post
You might also like... ×
Children born to older mothers are at an advantage, report researchers