Black tea consumption can pose problems to heavy tea drinkers

Published on July 15, 2010 at 5:46 AM · 1 Comment

Black tea, a Southern staple and the world's most consumed beverage, may contain higher concentrations of fluoride than previously thought, which could pose problems for the heaviest tea drinkers, Medical College of Georgia researchers say.

"The additional fluoride from drinking two to four cups of tea a day won't harm anyone; it's the very heavy tea drinkers who could get in trouble," said Dr. Gary Whitford, Regents Professor of oral biology in the School of Dentistry. He presented his findings today at the 2010 International Association of Dental Research Conference in Barcelona, Spain.

Most published reports show 1 to 5 milligrams of fluoride per liter of black tea, but a new study shows that number could be as high as 9 milligrams.

Fluoride is known to help prevent dental cavities, but long-term ingestion of excessive amounts could cause bone problems. The average person ingests a very safe amount, 2 to 3 milligrams, daily through fluoridated drinking water, toothpaste and food. It would take ingesting about 20 milligrams a day over 10 or more years before posing a significant risk to bone health.

Whitford discovered that the fluoride concentration in black tea had long been underestimated when he began analyzing data from four patients with advanced skeletal fluorosis, a disease caused by excessive fluoride consumption and characterized by joint and bone pain and damage. While it is extremely rare in the United States, the common link between these four patients was their tea consumption - each person drank 1 to 2 gallons of tea daily for the past 10 to 30 years.

"When we tested the patients' tea brands using a traditional method, we found the fluoride concentrations to be very low, so we wondered if that method was detecting all of the fluoride," Whitford said, noting that the tea plant, Camellia sinensis, creates a quandary when measuring fluoride. Unique among other plants, it accumulates huge concentrations of fluoride and aluminum in its leaves - each mineral ranges from 600 to more than 1,000 milligrams per kilogram of leaves. When the leaves are brewed for tea, some of the minerals leach into the beverage.

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Comments
  1. nyscof nyscof United States says:

    Tea lovers will have less fluoride worry if they tell their water companies and legislators to stop adding money-wasting, unnecessary fluoride chemicals into their tap water. No American is, or ever was, fluoride deficient. Fluoride is neither a nutrient nor essential for healthy teeth. It's added to water supplies because organized dentistry would rather treat the water supply of low-income people than their teeth. Boiling water condenses fluoride. Many arthritic symptoms Americans experience could be a result of the fluoride in their tap water. Join the Fluoride Action Network FluorideAction.Net which, together with Dr Mercola (mercola.com) are working towards ending fluoridation in the US and Canada so you can enjoy your cup of tea with less worry.

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