Processed meat and pancreatic cancer risk: Study

Published on January 16, 2012 at 6:37 PM · No Comments

By Dr Ananya Mandal, MD

Swedish researchers have found a link between eating processed meat, such as bacon or sausages, and pancreatic cancer. They said eating an extra 50g of processed meat, approximately one sausage, every day would increase a person's risk of getting pancreatic cancer by 19%. But the chance of developing the rare cancer remains low they added.

Prof Susanna Larsson, who conducted the study at the Karolinska Institute, told the BBC that links to other cancers were “quite controversial”. She added, “It is known that eating meat increases the risk of colorectal cancer, it's not so much known about other cancers.” The World Cancer Research Fund suggested the link may be mainly due to obesity. Eating red and processed meat has already been linked to bowel cancer. As a result the UK government recommended in 2011 that people eat no more than 70g a day.

The study, published in the British Journal of Cancer, analyzed data from 11 trials and 6,643 patients with pancreatic cancer. It found that eating processed meat increased the risk of pancreatic cancer. The risk increased by 19% for every 50g someone added to their daily diet. Having an extra 100g would increase the risk by 38% and is 57% for those eating 150g a day. They found a 29% increase in pancreatic cancer risk for men eating 120g per day of red meat but no increased risk among women. This may be because men in the study tended to eat more red meat than women.

The authors concluded, “Findings from this meta-analysis indicate that processed meat consumption is positively associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Red meat consumption was associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer in men. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings.”

Prof Larsson explained, “Pancreatic cancer has poor survival rates. So as well as diagnosing it early, it's important to understand what can increase the risk of this disease.” She recommended that people eat less red meat.

Cancer Research UK said the risk of developing pancreatic cancer in a lifetime was “comparatively small” - one in 77 for men and one in 79 for women. Sara Hiom, the charity's information director, said, “The jury is still out as to whether meat is a definite risk factor for pancreatic cancer and more large studies are needed to confirm this, but this new analysis suggests processed meat may be playing a role.” However, she pointed out that smoking was a much greater risk factor.

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