Key tips on how to sleep better, have more sex and stress less

Published on October 4, 2012 at 8:26 AM · No Comments

Making the time to take care of your body and fulfill your needs becomes increasingly more difficult with the pressures and stresses of a demanding schedule, fast-paced job and the increasing number of distractions around us.

Dr. Ana C. Krieger and Dr. Gail Saltz presented these key tips on how to sleep better, have more sex and stress less at the 30th Annual Women's Health Symposium hosted by NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center:

1. Sex is Good! Sex is a great form of exercise that enhances bonding with your partner, fights aging, reduces your stress and allows you to sleep better

2. Sex Alleviates Stress: Sexual problems can contribute to stress, but healthy sex can alleviate stress

3. Make "Me" Time: Carve out time to wind down for a few minutes before sleep

4. No Work Allowed! Use the bedroom for sleeping and sex, not work

5. The Secret to Sleep: The key elements of an adequate night's sleep include timing, duration and quality

6. Seven Hours or Bust! Only a fraction of people can function optimally with six or less hours of sleep

7. Turn Off TVs and Smartphones! Before bedtime and during sleep, avoid light exposure, even from electronic devices

8. Be Cozy: Create a cozy bedroom environment with a room temperature between 65-70° Fahrenheit

9. Keep a Routine: Establish a night time routine and get up at the same time every day

10. Manage your Stress: To better manage your stresses consider relaxation training, better time management and problem solving

Source:

NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center

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