Study finds low testosterone levels among obese teen boys

Published on October 17, 2012 at 4:10 AM · No Comments

A study by the University at Buffalo shows for the first time that obese males ages 14 to 20 have up to 50 percent less total testosterone than do normal males of the same age, significantly increasing their potential to be impotent and infertile as adults.

The paper (at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22970699) was published online as an accepted article in Clinical Endocrinology.

The authors are the same researchers in the University at Buffalo's School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences who first reported in 2004 the presence of low testosterone levels, known as hypogonadism, in obese, type 2 diabetic adult males and confirmed it in 2010 in more than 2,000 obese men, both diabetic and nondiabetic.

"We were surprised to observe a 50 percent reduction in testosterone in this pediatric study because these obese males were young and were not diabetic," says Paresh Dandona, MD, PhD, SUNY Distinguished Professor in the Department of Medicine, chief of the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism in the UB medical school and first author on the study. "The implications of our findings are, frankly, horrendous because these boys are potentially impotent and infertile," says Dandona. "The message is a grim one with massive epidemiological implications."

The small study included 25 obese and 25 lean males and was controlled for age and level of sexual maturity. Concentrations of total and free testosterone and estradiol, an estrogen hormone, were measured in morning fasting blood samples. The results need to be confirmed with a larger number of subjects, Dandona says.

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