FFR-guided PCI appears to be economically attractive than medical therapy for stable CAD

Published on October 26, 2012 at 1:20 AM · No Comments

A strategy of up-front percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for lesions confirmed to be obstructive by fractional flow reserve (FFR) was shown to be cost-effective in terms of quality-adjusted life years when compared to medical therapy alone. Results of the Cost-Effectiveness sub study of the FAME 2 trial were presented today at the 24th annual Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) scientific symposium. Sponsored by the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF), TCT is the world's premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine.

Fractional flow reserve (FFR) is a physiological index that determines the severity of blood flow blockages in the coronary arteries. An FFR measurement helps physicians to better identify if a specific coronary lesion is truly resulting in a reduction in blood flow.

The FAME 2 trial, a multicenter, international, randomized study, showed that FFR-guided percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) improved clinical outcomes when compared with optimal medical therapy (OMT) in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). The economic and quality of life implications of this strategy were presented at TCT.

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