Two research groups present data on Pressure BioSciences' PCT Platform at HUPO 2012

Published on November 3, 2012 at 7:34 AM · No Comments

Pressure BioSciences, Inc. (OTCQB: PBIO) ("PBI" or the "Company") today announced that scientists from two separate research groups presented data at the recent HUPO 11th Annual World Congress (Boston, MA) indicating that the incorporation of the Company's Pressure Cycling Technology ("PCT") Platform into their sample preparation processes resulted in a marked improvement in the quality and/or efficiency of test results.  These studies were presented by scientists from the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research of the Food and Drug Administration ("FDA") and from Janssen Research and Development ("Janssen").

Dr. Michail Alterman and colleagues from the FDA presented on the "Global Proteomic Architecture of Culture-Expanded Human Bone Marrow Multipotent Stromal Cells (MSCs) and the Proteomic Basis of Heterogeneity".  MSCs are believed to offer huge potential for cell-based therapies for a wide variety of diseases.  Currently, MSC studies are primarily focused on highly abundant proteins, which are generally unable to reveal important cellular events.  The authors presented on the use of a highly improved approach to sample preparation and protein identification.  This approach allowed them to better identify and analyze events likely to control the biology of the MSCs.  Such information could be essential in the design and development of new, life-saving cell-based therapies. The authors reported that PCT was an important part of their improved sample preparation approach. 

Scientists from Janssen Research & Development (a Johnson & Johnson Company) presented on the "Evaluation of Pressure-Assisted Enzymatic Digestion for the Optimal Digestion of Monoclonal Antibodies".  Monoclonal antibodies are widely used in scientific research, in diagnostics, and in therapeutics. However, it is essential that monoclonal antibodies be thoroughly identified and characterized before use.  This process most often requires the use of an enzyme to completely digest the monoclonal antibody into its basic building blocks.  The digestion process can be time-consuming, requiring as long as 24 hours to complete.  The authors reported that "pressure-assisted enzymatic digestion" (e.g., PCT) was very effective in significantly reducing the total time required to digest monoclonal proteins and to expedite their complete characterization.

Dr. Nate Lawrence, Vice President of Sales and Marketing for PBI, commented: "We are very pleased that two highly respected scientific teams have shown that the incorporation of the PCT Platform in their sample preparation workflow resulted in significant advantages, including savings in analysis time and improvements in test and result quality. Cell-based therapies are believed to offer enormous potential for improving human healthcare and the quality of life.  The monoclonal antibody market is believed to be in the tens of billions of dollars.  Consequently, we believe that the results presented by FDA and Janssen scientists at HUPO 2012 bode well for an increased demand of our PCT Platform in 2013 and beyond."    

 

Source:

Pressure BioSciences, Inc.

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