Study shows dramatic improvement in survival with in-hospital cardiac arrest over last decade

Published on November 16, 2012 at 1:49 AM · No Comments

A new study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine finds that survival in patients who experience a cardiac arrest in the hospital has increased significantly over the past decade. The study, led by cardiologists at University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics and Saint Luke's Mid America Heart Institute and the University of Missouri in Kansas City, also shows that this improvement has been accompanied by lower rates of neurological disability among those who survive.

"If we apply our study's findings to all patients with a cardiac arrest in the United States (approximately 200,000 people every year), we estimate that an additional 17,200 patients survived in 2009 who would have died in 2000," says lead study author Saket Girotra, M.D., UI associate in internal medicine. "And, more than 13,000 cases of significant neurological disability were avoided. So we are not only seeing an improvement in quantity of life, but also quality of life among survivors at the time of discharge."

The research team examined almost 85,000 patients who experienced a cardiac arrest -- when the heart stops beating -- while hospitalized over a 10-year period from 2000 to 2009. The study found that the risk-adjusted rate of survival among these patients increased from 13.7 percent in 2000 to 22.3 percent in 2009. The team found that the increase in survival over time was due to both a greater success in reviving patients from the initial cardiac arrest event as well as an improvement in survival following successful resuscitation until discharge.

Neurological damage that occurs during a cardiac arrest can lead to significant disability and reduced quality of life. So, an important question for the study team was whether the improved survival came at a cost of increased neurological disability among the survivors. In fact, the study showed that even as survival increased, neurological disability actually decreased from 32.9 percent in 2000 to 28.1 percent in 2009.

Read in | English | Español | Français | Deutsch | Português | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | 简体中文 | 繁體中文 | Nederlands | Русский | Svenska | Polski
Comments
The opinions expressed here are the views of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of News-Medical.Net.
Post a new comment
Post