Study reveals increase in incidence of dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury

Published on December 7, 2012 at 8:25 AM · No Comments

Acute kidney injury (AKI), an abrupt or rapid decline in kidney function, is a serious and increasingly prevalent condition that can occur after major infections, major surgery, or exposure to certain medications. The incidence rates of the most serious form of AKI—which requires dialysis—increased rapidly in all patient subgroups in the past decade in the United States, and the number of deaths associated with the condition more than doubled, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN).

The extent of AKI in the population is not well described. To investigate, Chi-yuan Hsu, MD, Raymond Hsu, MD (University of California, San Francisco) and their colleagues analyzed data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, a nationally representative dataset, to identify patients with AKI who required dialysis.

Among the major findings:
•From 2000 to 2009, the incidence of dialysis-requiring AKI increased from 222 to 533 cases per million person-years, averaging a 10% increase per year.
•Older age, male sex, and black race associated with higher incidence of dialysis-requiring AKI.
•The rapid increase in incidence was evident in all age, sex, and race subgroups examined.
•Changes over time in the population distribution of age, race, sex, as well as trends of sepsis, acute heart failure, and receipt of cardiac catheterization and mechanical ventilation accounted for about one third of the increase in dialysis-requiring AKI among hospitalized patients.
•The total number of deaths associated with dialysis-requiring AKI rose from 18,000 in 2000 to nearly 39,000 in 2009.

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