NCC to expand women's cancer programs in the developing world

Published on December 14, 2012 at 7:23 AM · No Comments

The National Cancer Coalition (NCC) is expanding its efforts to fight women's cancers in the developing world.

NCC has pledged to increase its commitment to assist underserved women's cancer patients at-risk of breast, cervical or ovarian cancers. Helping over 10,000 women in their battle against cancer last year, the Coalition is transforming the lives of underserved women around the globe.

"We have built a solid foundation for the expansion of our women's cancer programs," said Robert Landry , president of the National Cancer Coalition. "By devoting additional resources to these programs, we hope to more fully develop our women's cancer Centers of Excellence models that can then be replicated in other countries."  NCC's goal is dynamic women's cancer care through comprehensive programs that focus on prevention, awareness and education, medical training, early detection, treatment, and social services.  

During the past decade, the National Cancer Coalition has provided breast, cervical, and ovarian cancer therapies valued at more than $50 million to help at-risk overseas patients. This relief has been focused in the developing countries of the Dominican Republic, Ghana, Peru, and Paraguay.  NCC partners with leading pharmaceutical and medical technology companies, including BD, BMS, Hospira, J&J, Merck, and TEVA to support its women's cancer programs.  NCC looks forward to extending its reach by providing its programs in additional under-resourced countries.

NCC continues to build on its strong foundation of success in its recent initiatives, which include providing:

  • Modern liquid based cytology testing enabling 75,000 women to detect cervical cancer early
  • Mammogram and ultrasound diagnostic technology assess for early cancer detection
  • Training of medical workers on cancer prevention, early detection, and treatment methods
  • Cervical cancer vaccinations to help prevent cancer in thousands of girls
  • Chemotherapy and adjunctive therapy access for underserved women with cancer
  • Medical outreach and testing in rural communities with high rates of cancer
Source:

National Cancer Coalition

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