Children in asthma hotspots more likely to experience exercise-induced wheeze

Published on December 18, 2012 at 1:34 AM · No Comments

Asthmatic children in New York City neighborhoods with high rates of asthma make many more visits to the emergency room (ER) than those who live in other parts of the city. While socioeconomic factors such as lack of adequate preventive care are part of the equation (high-asthma neighborhoods tend to be lower income), new research points to a possible biological basis for the disparity. Asthmatic children living in asthma hotspots were twice as likely to experience a common symptom known as exercise-induced wheeze than were those in neighborhoods with lower asthma rates.

Results by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center appear online in Pediatrics, the journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

The study enrolled 195 middle-income children with asthma, ages 7 and 8, living throughout New York City-in areas with varying asthma prevalence. The children were given a clinical evaluation, and their caregivers completed a health survey that included whether they had experienced exercise-induced wheeze one or more times in the past year.

Overall, 43% of the children had experienced exercise-induced wheeze. Those living in asthma hotspots were twice as likely to have experienced symptoms after exercise and more likely to have visited their doctor in a hurry or an ER because of breathing problems, even after adjusting for neighborhood, income, and other factors.

"Exercise-induced wheeze is very uncomfortable for children. It can present rapidly after beginning any strenuous activity and lead quickly to respiratory symptoms, so it is not surprising that it is a factor in ER visits," said lead author Timothy Mainardi, MD, past fellow at Columbia University Medical Center and currently in practice at Hudson Allergy.

Dr. Mainardi and his colleagues found that one-third of the children experiencing exercise-induced wheeze had not used an inhaler prior to exercising. "The good news," he said, "is that these symptoms are preventable. Parents should talk with their doctor so they can be ready with a plan, including the use of appropriate medication such as a bronchodilator inhaler prior to exercise."

Addressing neighborhood disparities in asthma-related ER visits has been a public health priority for many years. A 2002 report by the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene found that ER visits for asthma were up to 20 times more common in low-income neighborhoods than elsewhere. Since then, asthma-related ER visits have declined, although a gap between higher and lower income neighborhoods remains.

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