SVR associated with prolonged overall survival in patients with chronic HCV infection

Published on December 26, 2012 at 7:15 AM · No Comments

Among patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection and advanced hepatic fibrosis (development of excess fibrous connective tissue), sustained virological response (SVR) to interferon-based treatment was associated with a lower risk of all-cause mortality compared with patients without SVR, according to a study in the December 26 issue of JAMA.

"Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and end-stage liver disease. The incidence of HCV-related cirrhosis and its complications is expected to increase in upcoming years. Davis et al estimated that currently 25 percent of the approximately 3.5 million U.S. patients with chronic HCV infection have cirrhosis and that the proportion of patients with cirrhosis is likely to increase up to 45 percent by 2030," according to background information in the article.

"Sustained virological response is defined as absence of viremia [the presence of a virus in the blood] 24 weeks after cessation of all antiviral medication. Although SVR has long-term durability, data on the relationship with improved survival to support its use as a surrogate end point of antiviral therapy is scarce. Demonstrating direct clinical benefits would better justify the use of intensive and costly antiviral therapy -" the authors write.

Adriaan J. van der Meer, M.D., of Erasmus MC University Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands and colleagues conducted a study to examine whether achievement of SVR vs. without SVR is associated with a prolonged overall survival in patients with chronic HCV infection and advanced hepatic fibrosis. The study, conducted at five tertiary care hospitals in Europe and Canada, included 530 patients with chronic HCV infection who started an interferon-based treatment regimen between 1990 and 2003, following histological proof of advanced hepatic fibrosis or cirrhosis. Complete follow-up ranged between January 2010 and October 2011. The patients were followed up for a median (midpoint) of 8.4 years. The baseline median age was 48 years and 369 patients (70 percent) were men.

Read in | English | Español | Français | Deutsch | Português | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | 简体中文 | 繁體中文 | Nederlands | Русский | Svenska | Polski
Comments
The opinions expressed here are the views of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of News-Medical.Net.
Post a new comment
Post