USC’s Keck Medical Center installs Aplio 500 and Viamo ultrasound systems from Toshiba

Published on January 9, 2013 at 3:32 AM · No Comments

To stay competitive using the most cutting-edge technology, the Keck Medical Center of the University of Southern California (USC) installed two AplioTM 500 ultrasound systems and a ViamoTM ultrasound system from Toshiba America Medical Systems, Inc. at its Keck Hospital of USC in Los Angeles, Calif. USC will use the Aplio 500 and Viamo systems for general exams, including pelvis, liver and abdominal.

Aplio 500 offers picture-perfect imaging with advanced visualization capabilities, including Fly Thru. Toshiba's Fly Thru is an industry-first technology using 4D ultrasound to "fly through" interiors of ducts and vessels for better exploration of lesions and masses, and to assist in planning interventional procedures. Additionally, Aplio 500 comes standard with enhanced workflow tools and ergonomics, including the iStyleTM+ Productivity Suite.

The Viamo is the industry's "no compromise" laptop ultrasound system, with advanced imaging capabilities not available on hand-carried systems. Equipped with the performance of Toshiba's larger, cart-based systems, Viamo delivers best-in-class image quality and penetration (up to 40 cm) from the operating room to a patient's bedside.

"We worked closely with USC to deliver the most innovative technology in the industry, including reliable ultrasound systems for a wide range of patient exams," said Tomohiro Hasegawa, director, Ultrasound Business Unit, Toshiba. "Aplio 500's Fly Thru technology is the most advanced visualization tool in the market, enabling USC to examine anatomy from views never before seen in ultrasound, and the Viamo is ideal for general exams, including traditional radiology."

USC also utilizes Toshiba's Aplio XG, Aplio MX and XarioTM XG ultrasound systems.

Source:

Toshiba America Medical Systems, Inc.

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