University of Washington develops new device to move kidney stones inside body

Published on January 13, 2014 at 2:05 PM · No Comments

Almost one in 10 people will someday experience a kidney stone, which creates what is described as the most intense pain imaginable. This increasingly common condition leads to hundreds of thousands of surgeries in the United States each year.

A new device developed at the University of Washington would let doctors use ultrasound to move kidney stones inside the body and help them pass by natural means.

"Ultrasound is used today to break up large stones. That's not what we're doing," said Michael Bailey, an engineer at the UW Applied Physics Laboratory. "We've developed low-power ultrasound that could move small stones to reduce pain, expense and treatment times."

A 15-patient trial using this technology is now under way at UW Medicine. The research is supported by the National Institutes of Health and the National Space Biomedical Research Institute, which is interested in the project because astronauts have an increased risk of developing kidney stones during space travel.

The UW team showed a prototype last spring at the American Urological Association's annual meeting, and Bailey was invited to give a keynote presentation. He was the only presenter in that session who was not a medical doctor.

"This is something urologists are excited about, so that's why we're pursuing it," Bailey said.

Kidney stones are crystals that develop in the urine. Shock-wave ultrasound has been used to treat big kidney stones for 30 years. That technique, known as lithotripsy, sends short pulses of high-energy ultrasound to shatter large stones. While the technique is noninvasive it usually requires general anesthesia and a hospital visit. It also leaves behind fragments that can grow and require another trip to the hospital or emergency room.

A patient with a small stone traditionally has to wait, drink plenty of water, and hope that the stone passes uneventfully. Medical studies have looked at standing on your head or hitting the patient in the lower back (technically called inversion and percussion). Those methods try to jiggle small stones from the lower part of the kidney, where they have only a 35 percent chance of passing naturally, to the middle of the kidney, where they have an 80 percent chance of passing without treatment.

The UW team proposes a gentler, more targeted way to guide the stones toward the exit route.

The prototype is a commercial ultrasound system modified to emit pulses only slightly stronger than those used for pregnancy imaging. These sustained, low-intensity waves are just enough to push the crystal through the surrounding fluid.

In the lab, Barbrina Dunmire, an engineer at the Applied Physics Laboratory who helped build the device, points an ultrasound probe at a stone inside a latex kidney. She activates the ultrasonic pulse and the stone immediately swings away through the clear liquid. A doctor would put the probe on a patient's lower back, then use an onscreen ultrasound image to locate the stone and direct the ultrasonic pulse.

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