Implants made of nickel-titanium alloy are not dangerous to health, shows study

Published on February 20, 2014 at 9:08 AM · No Comments

Materials scientists at the University of Jena examine implants made of nickel-titanium alloy in a long-term study

Jena (Germany) A trousers button, a coin or a watch can be dangerous for people with a nickel allergy. Approximately 1 in 10 Germans is allergic to the metal. "This raises the question of the safety of medical implants containing nickel," explains Professor Dr. Markus Rettenmayr of the Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Germany). Nickel-titanium alloys are increasingly used as material for cardiovascular implants in minimal invasive surgery. Once implanted, nickel-titanium alloys can release small amounts of nickel due to corrosion phenomena, the holder of the Chair of Metallic Materials explains. Our concern was that this could - in particular over a long period of time - lead to a nickel contamination in the patient's body that possibly results in health problems.

But these concerns are essentially unfounded: The team of Jena scientists led by Professor Rettenmayr and his colleague Dr. Andreas Undisz report in the current issue of the scientific journal 'Acta Biomaterialia' that the release of nickel from wires made of nickel-titanium alloys is very low, also over longer periods of time. The scientists could back up their statement in the first long-term study ever, which examined such nickel release in detail: The testing period for metal release, as requested for governmental approval of a medical implant, is only a few days. In contrast the Jena research team monitored the release of nickel over a time period of eight months.

Examination objects were fine wires from a superelastic nickel-titanium alloy that are, for example, applied in the form of occluders (these are medical implants used for the correction of a defective cardiac septum). Such occluders often consist of two tiny wire-mesh "umbrellas", approximately the size of a 1 Euro coin. The superelastic implant can be mechanically drawn into the shape of a thin thread, which then can be placed in a cardiac catheter. "By that means the occluders can be put into place via minimal invasive surgery," Dr. Undisz says. Ideally the implant will stay in the patient's body for years or decades.

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