NBTS Sri Lanka to use Transfusion Evidence Library to ensure quality, safety of blood supply

Published on April 8, 2014 at 9:12 AM · No Comments

Evidentia Publishing is pleased to announce that the National Blood Transfusion Service (NBTS) of Sri Lanka will be utilising the Transfusion Evidence Library - a unique, online database providing high quality, evidence-based information for all research related to transfusion medicine - in support of their efforts to ensure quality and safety of blood and blood components.

Dr. Anil Dissanayake, Director of the National Blood Transfusion Service Sri Lanka, commented, “Through our nationally coordinated system, we ensure the quality, safety and effectiveness of blood supply and related clinical, academic and research services in accordance with national requirements and WHO recommendations. Now the medical staff of NBTS can access the Transfusion Evidence Library to research the best practices, recommendations and alternatives in transfusion medicine and apply them to improve our services.”

Mark Schregardus, CEO of Evidentia Publishing, added: “We are glad that we can make a contribution securing quality assured blood services in Sri Lanka by giving Dr. Anil Dissanayake and his NBTS team access to our transfusion database, where quality of the evidence is ensured having applied strict methodological criteria. Especially in light of the World Health Organization’s selection of Sri Lanka as the host county for the World Blood Donation Day 2014 (WBDD), it matches our objectives well to secure access as wide as possible to our blood transfusion products in developing countries.”

Through the NBTS, Sri Lanka has been promoting voluntary unpaid donation to ensure safety, adequate and easy accessibility of blood and blood products. The NBTS now collects over 350,000 donations every year, up from just over 150,000 ten years ago. The proportion of voluntary donations has risen from 39% to 97% since 2003 (Source: WHO).

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