Tuberculosis News and Research RSS Feed - Tuberculosis News and Research

Tuberculosis (TB) is a bacterial infection caused by a germ called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The bacteria usually attack the lungs, but they can also damage other parts of the body. TB spreads through the air when a person with TB of the lungs or throat coughs, sneezes or talks. If you think you have been exposed, you should go to your doctor for tests as soon as possible. You are more likely to get TB if you have a weak immune system.
Transmission risk of Ebola virus disease during air travel remains low: WHO

Transmission risk of Ebola virus disease during air travel remains low: WHO

The World Health Organization today reiterated its position that the risk of transmission of Ebola virus disease during air travel remains low. [More]
Researchers discover new clue to understanding how TB medication attacks dormant TB bacteria

Researchers discover new clue to understanding how TB medication attacks dormant TB bacteria

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health say they have discovered a new clue to understanding how the most important medication for tuberculosis (TB) works to attack dormant TB bacteria in order to shorten treatment. [More]
Plan International outlines strategies to combat Ebola outbreak

Plan International outlines strategies to combat Ebola outbreak

The current Ebola outbreak, the most severe and complex in history, is now making its impact felt worldwide. [More]
Efforts to treat, contain Ebola virus trigger policy, ethical questions

Efforts to treat, contain Ebola virus trigger policy, ethical questions

A push to fast-track an experimental treatment is gaining momentum, but questions persist about this serum's effectiveness, whether the drug should be brought to the places currently confronting outbreaks of the disease and who should have access to its limited supplies. [More]
Inovio Pharmaceuticals reports increased revenue in second quarter 2014

Inovio Pharmaceuticals reports increased revenue in second quarter 2014

Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today reported financial results for the quarter ended June 30, 2014. Total revenue was $3.8 million and $6.2 million for the three and six months ended June 30, 2014, compared to $786,000 and $2.2 million for the same periods in 2013. [More]
Laboratories at TSRI investigate antibodies to fight Ebola virus

Laboratories at TSRI investigate antibodies to fight Ebola virus

Laboratories at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) are investigating antibodies to fight Ebola virus, including the three antibodies recently used to treat two American health care workers infected with the Ebola virus. [More]
Study reveals intricate mechanisms involved in enzyme that governs DNA duplication

Study reveals intricate mechanisms involved in enzyme that governs DNA duplication

In a study published today in Genes & Development, Dr Christian Speck from the MRC Clinical Sciences Centre's DNA Replication group, in collaboration with Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), New York, reveal the intricate mechanisms involved in the enzyme that governs DNA duplication during cell division. [More]
Johns Hopkins School of Nursing to launch new HIV curriculum for non-physician providers

Johns Hopkins School of Nursing to launch new HIV curriculum for non-physician providers

The 31-year-old Moore Clinic operated by the Johns Hopkins AIDS Service at the School of Medicine is a historic operation — the second-oldest AIDS clinic in the country. But when Jason Farley, PhD, MPH, CRNP, looks nowadays at the makeup of Moore's caregiving staff, he worries that he's seeing too much history. [More]
Tuberculosis in children: an interview with Dr Peter Dodd, University of Sheffield

Tuberculosis in children: an interview with Dr Peter Dodd, University of Sheffield

It was recently announced that new estimates indicated over 650,000 children develop tuberculosis (TB) every year in the 22 countries with a high burden of the disease (HBCs). Which countries are these and why are so many children developing TB in these areas? [More]
Researchers uncover how malaria parasite becomes resistant to fosmidomycin drug

Researchers uncover how malaria parasite becomes resistant to fosmidomycin drug

Researchers have uncovered a way the malaria parasite becomes resistant to an investigational drug. The discovery, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, also is relevant for other infectious diseases including bacterial infections and tuberculosis. [More]
New research aims to estimate benefits of different ways to combat TB in people with diabetes

New research aims to estimate benefits of different ways to combat TB in people with diabetes

New research aims to estimate the benefits of different ways to carry out screening both patients with tuberculosis (TB) for diabetes and the other way around in parts of the world where both diseases are common. [More]
New momentum: WHO welcomes progress in tackling viral hepatitis

New momentum: WHO welcomes progress in tackling viral hepatitis

On World Hepatitis Day, 28 July, WHO welcomes new progress in tackling one of the world's most serious diseases. Viral hepatitis - a group of infectious diseases known as hepatitis A, B, C, D, and E - affects millions of people worldwide, causing acute and chronic liver disease and killing close to 1.4 million people every year. [More]

Chemclin's Anti-TB assay helps in qualitative determination of Anti-TB in human serum

Chemclin's Anti-TB assay provides components for in-vitro qualitative determination of Antibody to Mycobacterium Tuberculosis (Anti-TB) in human serum or plasma by an indirect chemiluminescent assay method. [More]
Researchers use safer method to stimulate ovulation in women undergoing IVF treatment

Researchers use safer method to stimulate ovulation in women undergoing IVF treatment

Researchers have successfully used a new and potentially safer method to stimulate ovulation in women undergoing IVF treatment. [More]
Scientists reveal structure of protein involved in life and development of cancer

Scientists reveal structure of protein involved in life and development of cancer

Scientists reveal the structure of one of the most important and complicated proteins in cell division - a fundamental process in life and the development of cancer - in research published in Nature today (Sunday). [More]
Research shows promise to speed up drug discovery for deadly diseases

Research shows promise to speed up drug discovery for deadly diseases

Antibiotic resistance is depleting our arsenal against deadly diseases and infections, such as tuberculosis and Staph infections, but recent research shows promise to speed up the drug discovery process. [More]
New tools for detecting and monitoring TB in captive elephants

New tools for detecting and monitoring TB in captive elephants

Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the organism that causes tuberculosis in humans, also afflicts Asian (and occasionally other) elephants. Diagnosing and treating elephants with TB is a challenge, however, as little is known about how their immune systems respond to the infection. [More]
Researchers recover genome of bacterium from 700-year-old skeleton

Researchers recover genome of bacterium from 700-year-old skeleton

European researchers have recovered a genome of the bacterium Brucella melitensis from a 700-year-old skeleton found in the ruins of a Medieval Italian village. [More]

CRAG urges researchers to balance goal of shortening treatment for MDR-TB with patient safety

In a viewpoint published this week in The Lancet, the Community Research Advisors Group argue that research into bedaquiline – a new drug, fast tracked for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) – should proceed cautiously in people with drug-sensitive tuberculosis. [More]

Failure to provide adequate HIV services threatens global progress on HIV response, warns WHO

Failure to provide adequate HIV services for key groups - men who have sex with men, people in prison, people who inject drugs, sex workers and transgender people - threatens global progress on the HIV response, warns WHO. [More]