Tuberculosis News and Research RSS Feed - Tuberculosis News and Research

Tuberculosis (TB) is a bacterial infection caused by a germ called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The bacteria usually attack the lungs, but they can also damage other parts of the body. TB spreads through the air when a person with TB of the lungs or throat coughs, sneezes or talks. If you think you have been exposed, you should go to your doctor for tests as soon as possible. You are more likely to get TB if you have a weak immune system.
Four journalists from China and India win 2016 EurekAlert! Fellowships for International Science Reporters

Four journalists from China and India win 2016 EurekAlert! Fellowships for International Science Reporters

Four early-career journalists from China and India have emerged from the fiercest competition to date to win the 2016 EurekAlert! Fellowships for International Science Reporters. [More]
Early life exposures to toxic chemicals reduce infants' response to TB vaccine

Early life exposures to toxic chemicals reduce infants' response to TB vaccine

Early life exposures to toxic chemicals such as PCBs and DDT dampen an infant's response to the tuberculosis vaccine, according to a new study from the University of Rochester Environmental Health Sciences Center. [More]
TB sidetracked in the fight against HIV epidemic in Malawi

TB sidetracked in the fight against HIV epidemic in Malawi

Tuberculosis seems to have fallen between the cracks in poverty-stricken Malawi's sponsor-dependent health sector. The dominating focus on HIV may have left parts of Africa with a skewed health service, say researchers. [More]
WHO launches new comprehensive analysis of global health trends

WHO launches new comprehensive analysis of global health trends

The World Health Organization (WHO) today launched a new comprehensive analysis of global health trends since 2000 and an assessment of the challenges for the next 15 years. [More]
Recommendations for caring for Syrian refugees' health care needs

Recommendations for caring for Syrian refugees' health care needs

What unique health needs will Syrian refugees face, and how can Canadian physicians best provide health care to them and their families? A practice article posted online today in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) provides recommendations on screening and advice for primary care physicians to deal with this specific population's health care needs. [More]
RTFCCR grant supports ASCOLT study that evaluates effectiveness of Aspirin in colorectal cancer patients

RTFCCR grant supports ASCOLT study that evaluates effectiveness of Aspirin in colorectal cancer patients

Rising Tide Foundation for Clinical Cancer Research, an international private foundation based in Switzerland, has awarded a US $800,000 grant to be released over two years for the ASCOLT study conducted by Dr John Chia, Senior Consultant Medical Oncologist at the Division of Medical Oncology, National Cancer Centre Singapore. [More]
Innovative DNA technology enables faster and more effective diagnosis of TB cases

Innovative DNA technology enables faster and more effective diagnosis of TB cases

Whole Genome Sequencing is a faster, cheaper and more effective way of diagnosing tuberculosis says a new study published in the journal Lancet Respiratory Medicine. [More]
FIRS calls for continued international support to end AIDS epidemic by 2030

FIRS calls for continued international support to end AIDS epidemic by 2030

World AIDS Day, held annually on the first day of December each year since 1988, is an opportunity for people around the world to join in the fight, show their support for those living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and commemorate the lives of those who have died. [More]
Study reveals how MGCs dispose waste that obstructs normal physiological processes

Study reveals how MGCs dispose waste that obstructs normal physiological processes

If rubbish is too big and unwieldy for normal household waste, its removal becomes the job of specialized experts. Researchers from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now discovered, in cooperation with colleagues from the UK, how large, fused cells help our body to deal with bulky items that may otherwise obstruct normal physiological processes. [More]
WHO recommends new strategies to treat HIV patients, reduce new infections

WHO recommends new strategies to treat HIV patients, reduce new infections

The world is poised to end the AIDS epidemic by 2030 – provided it can accelerate the pace of progress achieved globally over the past 15 years, according to a new World Health Organization (WHO) report. [More]
MPP collaborates with University of Liverpool to accelerate development of HIV nanomedicines

MPP collaborates with University of Liverpool to accelerate development of HIV nanomedicines

The Medicines Patent Pool today announced a collaboration with the University of Liverpool and a licence for the university's Solid Drug Nanoparticle (SDN) technology to accelerate the development of WHO-recommended antiretrovirals as nanomedicines. [More]

Scientists show how malaria parasites invade the liver

Scientists at the Center for Infectious Disease Research recently uncovered a critical piece in the puzzle of how malaria parasites infect their host. The work, recently published in Science Magazine, reveals the details of how the malaria parasite invades its initial target organ, the liver. Without infection of the liver, the parasites cannot multiply or spread to the blood. Infection of the blood causes illness, spread of the disease, and, ultimately, death. [More]
U of T researchers discover mysterious fungus that defends against neighbouring bacteria

U of T researchers discover mysterious fungus that defends against neighbouring bacteria

Researchers at the University of Toronto examined fungi in the mucus of patients with cystic fibrosis and discovered how one particularly cunning fungal species has evolved to defend itself against neighbouring bacteria. [More]
Many European hospitals fail to routinely test people at risk of HIV infection

Many European hospitals fail to routinely test people at risk of HIV infection

A new study reveals that many European hospitals fail to routinely test people who may be at risk of an HIV-infection. If tests were more widely offered in the healthcare system, fewer HIV-patients would go unnoticed, especially in Northern Europe. [More]
Promising new treatment for sepsis on the horizon

Promising new treatment for sepsis on the horizon

A promising new drug for sepsis is on the horizon thanks to new funding from the British Heart Foundation, which could help take the laboratory discovery into the clinic. [More]
Researchers identify a mechanism that may explain association between obesity and cancer

Researchers identify a mechanism that may explain association between obesity and cancer

Researchers have identified a mechanism that allows cancer cells to respond and grow rapidly when levels of sugar in the blood rise. This may help to explain why people who develop conditions in which they have chronically high sugar levels in their blood, such as obesity, also have an increased risk of developing certain types of cancer. [More]
TSRI scientists discover first-in-class compounds that target persistent tuberculosis

TSRI scientists discover first-in-class compounds that target persistent tuberculosis

Tuberculosis has been infecting humans for several millennia, making it one of the most horribly successful diseases in history. Today, it is still a major killer, responsible for some 1.5 million deaths each year. [More]
Study shows how parasitic worm infection increases susceptibility to TB

Study shows how parasitic worm infection increases susceptibility to TB

Scientists have shown how a parasitic worm infection common in the developing world increases susceptibility to tuberculosis. The study demonstrated that treating the parasite reduces lung damage seen in mice that also are infected with tuberculosis, thereby eliminating the vulnerability to tuberculosis (TB) that the parasite is known to cause. [More]
Analyzing potential TB vaccine

Analyzing potential TB vaccine

When results from a landmark tuberculosis vaccine trial in Cape Town, South Africa were published in The Lancet in February 2013, the headlines were grim, despite hopes that the trial would point toward a successful way to thwart one of the globe's biggest public health threats. [More]
ACR releases 2015 Guideline for Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis

ACR releases 2015 Guideline for Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis

The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) released its 2015 Guideline for the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) during the 2015 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in San Francisco. [More]
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