Tuberculosis News and Research RSS Feed - Tuberculosis News and Research

Tuberculosis (TB) is a bacterial infection caused by a germ called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The bacteria usually attack the lungs, but they can also damage other parts of the body. TB spreads through the air when a person with TB of the lungs or throat coughs, sneezes or talks. If you think you have been exposed, you should go to your doctor for tests as soon as possible. You are more likely to get TB if you have a weak immune system.
N.Y. governor unveils plan to fight HIV

N.Y. governor unveils plan to fight HIV

The goal, the governor says, is to reduce new HIV infections to 750 per year by 2020 through aggressive treatment and testing. [More]
First Edition: June 30, 2014

First Edition: June 30, 2014

Today's early morning highlights from the major news organizations, including an announcement coming today for a new VA secretary and expectations for a Supreme Court decision on the challenge to the health law's contraceptive mandate by two for-profit companies. [More]
Host-directed therapy: A new type of TB treatment

Host-directed therapy: A new type of TB treatment

In a new study published in Nature, scientists describe a new type of tuberculosis (TB) treatment that involves manipulating the body's response to TB bacteria rather than targeting the bacteria themselves, a concept called host-directed therapy. [More]
First step toward new drugs that can transcend antibiotic resistance issues

First step toward new drugs that can transcend antibiotic resistance issues

Scientists in the United States and India have successfully modified the precursor to one of the drugs used to treat tuberculosis, an important first step toward new drugs that can transcend antibiotic resistance issues that experts consider a serious threat to global health. [More]
Janssen seeks expanded approval of VELCADE from EU for Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Janssen seeks expanded approval of VELCADE from EU for Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Janssen-Cilag International NV today announced its submission of a type II variation to the European Medicines Agency to expand the label for VELCADE (bortezomib) to include its use, in combination with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and prednisone, for the treatment of adult patients with previously untreated Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL). [More]
Research: TB infection among people taking corticosteroid pills may be underestimated

Research: TB infection among people taking corticosteroid pills may be underestimated

Tuberculosis infection among people taking corticosteroid pills may be underestimated, new research suggests. [More]
Computer analysis of family photos could help diagnose rare genetic disorders

Computer analysis of family photos could help diagnose rare genetic disorders

Computer analysis of photographs could help doctors diagnose which condition a child with a rare genetic disorder has, say Oxford University researchers. [More]
FEI announces the sale of a complete correlative workflow to the University of Maastricht

FEI announces the sale of a complete correlative workflow to the University of Maastricht

FEI (NASDAQ: FEIC) announces the sale of a complete correlative workflow to the University of Maastricht. The systems will be installed at the University’s Institute of Nanoscopy, a new research facility that will use the high-resolution microscopes to understand the working mechanisms of protein complexes in an effort to develop new and improved treatment and prevention for disease, such as cancer and tuberculosis. [More]
Researchers discover analgesic mechanism that prevents pain in Buruli ulcer patients

Researchers discover analgesic mechanism that prevents pain in Buruli ulcer patients

When the body receives an injury to the skin, a signal is sent to the brain, which generates a sensation of pain. [More]
DNA sequencing does not reveal the pathogenicity of bacteria

DNA sequencing does not reveal the pathogenicity of bacteria

While more and more genomic information is becoming available at a drastically increasing pace, the knowledge we can gain about how microorganisms interact with their surrounding, infect hosts and alter their molecular programs in accordance to changing environmental conditions remains widely not deducible from genomic data alone, the researchers from University of Southern Denmark claim. [More]
C. difficile bacteria pose major health threat without proper infection prevention in hospitals, homes

C. difficile bacteria pose major health threat without proper infection prevention in hospitals, homes

Without proper infection prevention in hospitals, and now homes, the Clostridium difficile bacteria poses a major health threat, cautions a Case Western Reserve University infection control researcher. [More]
Janssen, Viiv Healthcare to develop single tablet regimen for maintenance treatment of HIV

Janssen, Viiv Healthcare to develop single tablet regimen for maintenance treatment of HIV

Janssen R&D Ireland Ltd announced today that they have entered into a collaboration with ViiV Healthcare to develop and commercialize a new single tablet regimen containing Janssen's Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor rilpivirine (marketed as EDURANT®) and ViiV's Integrase Inhibitor dolutegravir(marketed as TIVICAY®) as the sole active ingredients for the maintenance treatment of people living with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). [More]
Otsuka Pharmaceutical begins tolvaptan Phase 3b study in patients with ADPKD

Otsuka Pharmaceutical begins tolvaptan Phase 3b study in patients with ADPKD

Otsuka Pharmaceutical Development & Commercialization, Inc., announced today that patient enrollment has begun for a new Phase 3b study of tolvaptan for adult patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), the most common, life-threatening, inherited genetic kidney disorder. [More]
Anthrax, brucellosis and bovine TB fail to receive official recognition, say researchers

Anthrax, brucellosis and bovine TB fail to receive official recognition, say researchers

Decades of neglect have allowed infectious diseases to devastate the lives of thousands of people in the developing world, a study reveals. [More]
New TB blood test could eliminate unnecessary treatment

New TB blood test could eliminate unnecessary treatment

A new screening process for tuberculosis (TB) infections in Canadian prisons could mean that more than 50 per cent of those screened won't undergo unnecessary treatment due to false positives. [More]
Patients and families benefit from shorter TB treatment regimens

Patients and families benefit from shorter TB treatment regimens

Shorter TB treatment regimens will reduce the out-of-pocket expenses incurred by both patients and their family members, who often act as the patients' guardians. In addition, shorter TB regimens may allow an earlier return to productive activities for patients and their families. [More]
UK makes £5.64M investment in most advanced crystallography technology

UK makes £5.64M investment in most advanced crystallography technology

The UK's structural biology community will have access to the most advanced crystallography technology in the world thanks to a - £5.64M investment from UK research funders. [More]
Growing resistance to antibiotics demands a coordinated global response, say experts

Growing resistance to antibiotics demands a coordinated global response, say experts

Growing resistance to antibiotics and other drugs demands a coordinated global response on the same scale as efforts to address climate change, experts say. [More]
AbbVie receives HUMIRA orphan drug designation from FDA for treatment of non-infectious uveitis

AbbVie receives HUMIRA orphan drug designation from FDA for treatment of non-infectious uveitis

AbbVie announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted HUMIRA orphan drug designation for the treatment of non-infectious intermediate, posterior, or pan-uveitis, or chronic non-infectious anterior uveitis, a group of rare but serious inflammatory diseases of the eye. [More]
Disease-causing bacteria can linger in airplane cabins for days, says study

Disease-causing bacteria can linger in airplane cabins for days, says study

Disease-causing bacteria can linger on surfaces commonly found in airplane cabins for days, even up to a week, according to research presented at the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology. [More]