Tuberculosis News and Research RSS Feed - Tuberculosis News and Research

Tuberculosis (TB) is a bacterial infection caused by a germ called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The bacteria usually attack the lungs, but they can also damage other parts of the body. TB spreads through the air when a person with TB of the lungs or throat coughs, sneezes or talks. If you think you have been exposed, you should go to your doctor for tests as soon as possible. You are more likely to get TB if you have a weak immune system.
Researchers discover role of RORC mutations in patients with candidiasis and mycobacteriosis

Researchers discover role of RORC mutations in patients with candidiasis and mycobacteriosis

The discovery of bi-allelic mutations in RORC in patients with candidiasis and mycobacteriosis revealed the pivotal role of RORC in mucocutaneous immunity to Candida and in systemic immunity to Mycobacterium in humans. [More]
Experts call for more spending on global health aids

Experts call for more spending on global health aids

As experts debate the slow response to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa and call for better international coordination, a new analysis estimates that $22 billion was spent on global health aid in 2013, yet only a fifth of this went toward such global imperatives as research on diseases that disproportionally affect the poor, outbreak preparedness and global health leadership. [More]
Starting anti-HIV treatment early improves survival among patients with newly diagnosed TB

Starting anti-HIV treatment early improves survival among patients with newly diagnosed TB

Starting anti-HIV treatment within two weeks of the diagnosis of tuberculosis, or TB, improved survival among patients with both infections who had very low immune-cell counts, according to an analysis by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Health. [More]
Janssen-sponsored Phase 2b trial shows guselkumab effective in treating moderate to severe plaque psoriasis

Janssen-sponsored Phase 2b trial shows guselkumab effective in treating moderate to severe plaque psoriasis

Results published today in The New England Journal of Medicine from a Janssen Research & Development, LLC (Janssen)-sponsored Phase 2b trial showed up to 86 percent of patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis receiving guselkumab (CNTO 1959) achieved a Physician's Global Assessment (PGA) score of cleared psoriasis or minimal psoriasis at week 16, the study's primary endpoint. [More]
EPFL scientists identify lansoprazole as potential candidate against tuberculosis

EPFL scientists identify lansoprazole as potential candidate against tuberculosis

Testing thousands of approved drugs, EPFL scientists have identified an unlikely anti-tuberculosis drug: the over-the-counter antacid lansoprazole (Prevacid). [More]
Imaging proteasome complex helps show target site for potential cancer drugs

Imaging proteasome complex helps show target site for potential cancer drugs

Scientists have pioneered the use of a high-powered imaging technique to picture in exquisite detail one of the central proteins of life - a cellular recycling unit with a role in many diseases. [More]
Robert Hunter receives Harlan J. Spjut Award and Gold-Headed Cane Award

Robert Hunter receives Harlan J. Spjut Award and Gold-Headed Cane Award

Robert Hunter Jr., M.D., Ph.D., Distinguished Chair in Molecular Pathology and chair of the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Medical School, has received two prestigious awards. [More]
SLU's Center for Vaccine Development receives $2.9 million to study new vaccine to combat TB

SLU's Center for Vaccine Development receives $2.9 million to study new vaccine to combat TB

Saint Louis University's Center for Vaccine Development has received a $2.9 million award from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to study a new tuberculosis vaccine. [More]
MSD announces EC approval of SIMPONI (golimumab) for treatment of adult patients with nr-axial SpA

MSD announces EC approval of SIMPONI (golimumab) for treatment of adult patients with nr-axial SpA

MSD (Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, New Jersey, USA) today announced that on 22 June the European Commission approved SIMPONI (golimumab) for the treatment of adult patients with severe, active non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nr-axial SpA). [More]
Study: Cellular respiration separates effects of bactericidal and bacteriostatic antibiotics

Study: Cellular respiration separates effects of bactericidal and bacteriostatic antibiotics

Antibiotics are the mainstay in the treatment of bacterial infections, and together with vaccines, have enabled the near eradication of infectious diseases like tuberculosis, at least in developed countries. [More]
Study shows development assistance for health increased substantially since 1990

Study shows development assistance for health increased substantially since 1990

Funding for health in developing countries has increased substantially since 1990, with a focus on HIV/AIDS, maternal health, and newborn and child health, and limited funding for noncommunicable diseases, according to a study in the June 16 issue of JAMA. [More]
WHO and World Bank Group: 400 million people do not have access to essential health services

WHO and World Bank Group: 400 million people do not have access to essential health services

A World Health Organization and World Bank Group report launched today shows that 400 million people do not have access to essential health services and 6% of people in low- and middle-income countries are tipped into or pushed further into extreme poverty because of health spending. [More]
Switching from Remicade to Inflectra benefits patients with rheumatic diseases

Switching from Remicade to Inflectra benefits patients with rheumatic diseases

Hospira, Inc., a global leader in biosimilars, today announced the results of an independent clinical study, showing patients with rheumatic diseases experienced comparable clinical effectiveness and safety after switching from Remicadeā„¢ to Inflectra. [More]
Bay Area Lyme Foundation announces winners of 2015 Emerging Leader Award

Bay Area Lyme Foundation announces winners of 2015 Emerging Leader Award

Bay Area Lyme Foundation, the leading national nonprofit funder of innovative Lyme disease research, today announced that the winners of its 2015 Emerging Leader Award, are collaborators Nira Pollock, MD, PhD, and John Branda, MD. [More]
Scientists identify new agent to combat tuberculosis

Scientists identify new agent to combat tuberculosis

According to figures of the World Health Organization, some 8.7 million people contracted tuberculosis in 2012 and this disease is fatal for approximately 1.3 million people throughout the world each year. One of the main problems is that the tuberculosis pathogens have become resistant to the antibiotics used to fight them. [More]
Steven Schiff wins NIH Director's Pioneer Award to reduce infant deaths from neonatal sepsis

Steven Schiff wins NIH Director's Pioneer Award to reduce infant deaths from neonatal sepsis

Steven Schiff, professor of neurosurgery and Brush Chair Professor of Engineering in Engineering Science and Mechanics, has received a $4.1 million National Institutes of Health Director's Pioneer Award, for research aimed at reducing the number of infant deaths from neonatal sepsis in developing countries by identifying the roots of infection, from season of birth to home environment. [More]
Researchers transform bacteria into 'secret agents' for detecting disease

Researchers transform bacteria into 'secret agents' for detecting disease

Another step forward has just been taken in the area of synthetic biology. Research teams from Inserm and CNRS (French National Centre for Scientific Research) Montpellier, in association with Montpellier Regional University Hospital and Stanford University, have transformed bacteria into "secret agents" that can give warning of a disease based solely on the presence of characteristic molecules in the urine or blood. To perform this feat, the researchers inserted the equivalent of a computer programme into the DNA of the bacterial cells. [More]
ProBioGen initiates clinical trials of Ebola vaccine using AGE1.CR.pIX cell line

ProBioGen initiates clinical trials of Ebola vaccine using AGE1.CR.pIX cell line

Complex biologics development and manufacturing specialist ProBioGen today announced that an investigational vaccine against Ebola virus disease, produced on its proprietary, continuous muscovy duck AGE1.CR.pIX cell line, has proceeded into clinical trials at the Jenner Institute, Oxford University, UK. [More]
New finding may lead to development of immunity-based therapies for tuberculosis

New finding may lead to development of immunity-based therapies for tuberculosis

A study by researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center has identified how an enzyme involved in protecting the body from pathogens senses Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB), a bacterial pathogen that infects millions of people worldwide and causes about 1.5 million deaths annually. [More]
New TB-Profiler tool to find appropriate drugs for TB patients may improve likelihood of cure

New TB-Profiler tool to find appropriate drugs for TB patients may improve likelihood of cure

Finding out what drugs can be used to treat a patient with tuberculosis (TB) can be sped up by days or weeks, thanks to a new free online tool. The new TB-Profiler tool, developed by a team of scientists led by Dr Taane Clark at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, analyses and interprets genome sequence data to predict resistance to 11 drugs used for the treatment of TB. [More]
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