Tuberculosis News and Research RSS Feed - Tuberculosis News and Research

Tuberculosis (TB) is a bacterial infection caused by a germ called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The bacteria usually attack the lungs, but they can also damage other parts of the body. TB spreads through the air when a person with TB of the lungs or throat coughs, sneezes or talks. If you think you have been exposed, you should go to your doctor for tests as soon as possible. You are more likely to get TB if you have a weak immune system.
GHIT Fund announces grants to speed up innovative drug development for neglected diseases

GHIT Fund announces grants to speed up innovative drug development for neglected diseases

The Global Health Innovative Technology Fund, a new public health partnership that is bringing Japanese know-how and investment to the global fight against infectious diseases, today announced three grants worth a total of US$6.8 million to speed the development of innovative drugs for some of the world’s most neglected diseases—schistosomiasis, Chagas disease and parasitic roundworms. [More]
New mobile phone app could monitor diabetes, kidney disease and urinary tract infections

New mobile phone app could monitor diabetes, kidney disease and urinary tract infections

A recently-developed mobile phone application could make monitoring conditions such as diabetes, kidney disease, and urinary tract infections much clearer and easier for both patients and doctors, and could eventually be used to slow or limit the spread of pandemics in the developing world. [More]

Dartmouth, Aeras to jointly conduct trial of DAR-901 vaccine against TB

Dartmouth's Geisel School of Medicine and Aeras, a global nonprofit biotech, announced a collaboration to jointly conduct a trial of a new vaccine against tuberculosis (TB), one of the world's deadliest diseases. The vaccine, known as DAR-901, is related to the vaccine SRL-172, previously shown by Dartmouth investigators to decrease the risk of TB in a trial known as the DarDar Trial. [More]
China manages to halve TB prevalence in 20 years

China manages to halve TB prevalence in 20 years

Over the last 20 years, China has more than halved its tuberculosis (TB) prevalence, with rates falling from 170 to 59 per 100 000 population. This unrivalled success has been driven by a massive scale-up of the directly observed, short-course (DOTS) strategy, from half the population in the 1990s to the entire country after 2000, according to findings from a 20-year-long analysis of national survey data, published in The Lancet. [More]
UCLA creates new program that helps adoptive parents, children navigate through international adoption process

UCLA creates new program that helps adoptive parents, children navigate through international adoption process

With thousands of internationally adopted children arriving in the United States each year, there is a growing demand for a specialized health-care support system that helps adoptive parents and children navigate through the international adoption process. [More]
Scientists build tiny "molecular drill bits" that kill bacteria by bursting through their protective cell walls

Scientists build tiny "molecular drill bits" that kill bacteria by bursting through their protective cell walls

In response to drug-resistant "superbugs" that send millions of people to hospitals around the world, scientists are building tiny, "molecular drill bits" that kill bacteria by bursting through their protective cell walls. [More]

EPFL sets up foundation to release antibiotic for tuberculosis

Even though tuberculosis kills more than 1.5 million people every year, the market is not cost-effective for pharmaceutical companies. So EPFL is setting up a foundation to release an antibiotic developed in its own laboratories under EU funding. [More]

Controlled TB vaccine trial designed to study prevention of Mtb infection by vaccination

Aeras today announced the initiation of the first randomized, controlled tuberculosis (TB) vaccine trial designed to study prevention of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection by vaccination. [More]
Longer looks: Health care in jail; preventing Medicare drug fraud; new medical codes

Longer looks: Health care in jail; preventing Medicare drug fraud; new medical codes

"Sheriff Ashe," [the waitress] began. "My daughter is in your jail." She then told me her daughter's story. "Laura," as I'll call her here, was a bright and sociable girl who, after graduating from high school, went on to community college. [More]
New drug is effective against superbug MRSA

New drug is effective against superbug MRSA

"I routinely call hospitals and request their yearly antibiotic susceptibility testing data," said Washington University in St. Louis' Timothy Wencewicz. "The log might say, for example, that they've treated hundreds of patients for Acinetobacter baumanni, a bacterium brought into U.S. hospitals by soldiers wounded in the Iraq war, with 30 different antibiotics. [More]
Novel cancer immunotherapy approach may provide new weapon against most deadly tumors

Novel cancer immunotherapy approach may provide new weapon against most deadly tumors

A novel approach to cancer immunotherapy - strategies designed to induce the immune system to attack cancer cells - may provide a new and cost-effective weapon against some of the most deadly tumors, including ovarian cancer and mesothelioma. [More]
Stock-outs of ARV drugs in Central African Republic impact health of HIV-infected people

Stock-outs of ARV drugs in Central African Republic impact health of HIV-infected people

​According to Pierre-Marie David of the University of Montreal's Faculty of Pharmacy, stock-outs of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs in recent years in the Central African Republic have had a dramatic impact on the health of HIV-infected people. [More]
Scientists find certain species of nontuberculous mycobacteria in water that cause infection in humans

Scientists find certain species of nontuberculous mycobacteria in water that cause infection in humans

Brisbane's water supply has been found to contain disease carrying bugs which can be directly linked to infections in some patients, according to a new study by QUT. [More]
Researchers discover novel treatments for psoriasis that are likely to cause fewer side effects

Researchers discover novel treatments for psoriasis that are likely to cause fewer side effects

​Almost ten years ago, the group led by Erwin Wagner, currently at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), developed genetically modified mice showing symptoms very reminiscent to psoriasis. [More]
NPR correspondent to deliver keynote address at Seattle Biomed's annual event

NPR correspondent to deliver keynote address at Seattle Biomed's annual event

Seattle BioMed today announced that Jason Beaubien, global health and development correspondent of National Public Radio (NPR), will deliver the keynote address at the Passport to Global Health Celebration on March 5. [More]
Vitamin A may play key role in combating TB, says study

Vitamin A may play key role in combating TB, says study

Tuberculosis is a major global problem, affecting 2 billion people worldwide and causing an estimated 2 million deaths annually. Western countries are once again tackling the disease, with recent outbreaks in Los Angeles and London. [More]
UNC receives $40M for clinical trials unit devoted to HIV/AIDS treatment, prevention and research

UNC receives $40M for clinical trials unit devoted to HIV/AIDS treatment, prevention and research

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has received a seven-year, more than $40 million award from the National Institutes of Health for a clinical trials unit that will implement the scientific agendas of five NIH networks devoted to HIV/AIDS treatment, prevention, and cure research. [More]

Active ingredient in vinegar can effectively kill mycobacteria

The active ingredient in vinegar, acetic acid, can effectively kill mycobacteria, even highly drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis, an international team of researchers from Venezuela, France, and the US reports in mBio-, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. [More]
FDA approves sNDA to include radiographic data updating label of Pfizer XELJANZ for treatment of RA

FDA approves sNDA to include radiographic data updating label of Pfizer XELJANZ for treatment of RA

Pfizer Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) to update the current label of XELJANZ® (tofacitinib citrate) 5 mg tablets to include radiographic data from two Phase 3 studies, ORAL Scan (A3921044) and ORAL Start. [More]
Professor receives $17M NIH grant to support IMPAACT Network

Professor receives $17M NIH grant to support IMPAACT Network

Grace Aldrovandi, MD, CM, principal investigator at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles, has been awarded $17 million by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]