Realignment with participants' interest important for future of genomic research

Published on January 25, 2011 at 7:53 AM · No Comments

Obtaining consent for genetic studies can be an opportunity for researchers to foster respectful engagement with participants, not merely to mitigate legal risk. This shift is proposed in a policy forum appearing tomorrow, Jan. 21, in Science, the journal of the American Academy for the Advancement of Science.

The authors of the article, "Research Practices and Participant Preferences: The Growing Gulf" recommend new approaches that treat participants as true stakeholders in research, who willingly take on risks because they believe the potential benefits to society outweigh potential harms. Current practices presume that study participants don't want to hear from researchers, or that participants find general, one-time consent acceptable. However, these practices may be contrary to participants' preferences, according to their report.

The commentators are ethicists and medical researchers from the University of Washington (UW) and Group Health Research Institute in Seattle. They are: Susan Brown Trinidad and Stephanie M. Fullerton from the UW Department of Bioethics and Humanities, Evette J. Ludman and Eric B. Larson from Group Health Research Institute, Gail Jarvik, division head, UW Medical Genetics, and Wylie Burke, department chair, UW Bioethics and Humanities.

The authors point to recent national events that have increased attention on the use of biological samples in research: The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, a best-selling book on the origins of the HeLa cell line; a lawsuit over the Texas Department of Health Services supplying newborn screening blood samples for research; and the settlement of the Havasupai tribe's lawsuit against the Arizona Board of Regents for unauthorized use of biospecimens. Claims of harm in these and other cases have included breach of privacy, stigmatization, and attacks against cultural beliefs.

Settlements have included financial payments, research restrictions, and sample destruction. In some cases, plaintiffs simply wanted to be asked permission.

Increased scrutiny of research practices is coming at a time when advances in genomic science depend on collecting massive amounts of data for analysis, the authors observed. To obtain large numbers of samples, improve the reliability of findings, and achieve greater efficiency, genome scientists around the world have begun pooling biospecimens and data from previous studies. The Science commentary notes that current U.S. federal policies or laws regarding human subjects' protection or privacy of health information do not apply to studies using only coded samples and data. At the same time, other federal policies mandate data sharing and strongly encourage researchers to deposit their study data in public repositories such as the database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP), a public access resource maintained by the National Institutes of Health.

The authors added that many disease-specific and general-purpose biorepositories have attracted many participants who have signed blanket informed consents for a broad range of potential purposes. Although a U.S. survey showed that more than 90 percent of respondents would be willing to have their samples and health data placed in a research biobank, their views on blanket consents were divided: 48 percent preferred one-time blanket consent, and 42 percent wanted the chance to re-consent for each new use of their data. Policy disagreement continues, the authors said. Some policy advisors want stronger regulations, but other s believe an opt-out model is better. In an opt-out, consent for research use of clinical samples (with personal identifiers removed) is presumed unless denied.

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