Lantus initiation may help limit weight gain in type 2 diabetes patients

Published on September 12, 2011 at 11:16 AM · No Comments

Sanofi (EURONEXT: SAN and NYSE: SNY) announced today data that demonstrates that initiating Lantus® (insulin glargine [rDNA origin] injection) in type 2 diabetes patients leads to better glycemic control and comparable and modest weight gain versus a comparator group consisting of other insulins, oral antidiabetics (OADs) and dietary changes. The lowest weight gain was seen in patients initiating treatment with baseline A1C levels below eight percent and in patients aged 65 and older. This data is being presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) 47th Annual Meeting in Lisbon, Portugal.

"Weight gain is a commonly perceived effect of using insulin in type 2 diabetes," said Jack Leahy of the University of Vermont and lead investigator of the data presented at the meeting. "This data demonstrates that initiation of Lantus® when A1C is less than eight percent may help to limit weight gain in this patient population."

A total of 2,900 patients were evaluated from nine pooled, randomized, controlled 24-week studies. In each study, Lantus® was tested against a comparator (63% other insulins, 32% OADs, 6% dietary). Weight gain was assessed by treatment, demographics, age and baseline A1C and FPG.

Weight gain with Lantus® was similar to weight gain for comparators (mean weight gain 2.2 kg vs. 2.1kg) but varied with patient baseline A1C and age. Patients with A1C below 8 percent had the lowest overall weight gain. Weight gain increased with increasing baseline A1C (Pearson correlation, glargines age increased (Pearson correlation, glargine).

More patients achieved A1C less than or equal to seven percent with Lantus® versus comparators (58.3% vs. 52.7%).

Hypoglycemia (glucose confirmed <50 mg/dL) occurred significantly (p<0.0001) less often with Lantus® than the comparators, with the lowest estimate among Lantus® patients 65 years and older.

Source:

Sanofi

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