Perivascular fat tissue may influence onset of atherosclerosis

Published on April 21, 2012 at 1:02 AM · No Comments

Researchers at UC have confirmed that fat surrounding the outside of arteries in humans-particularly the left coronary artery-may influence the onset of coronary artery disease, or atherosclerosis, which is the leading cause of death in the U.S.

These findings, being presented at the American Heart Association's Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology (ATVB) 2012 Scientific Sessions in Chicago April 20, 2012, may help in identifying the molecular culprit, with the goal of creating targeted therapies for atherosclerosis before the disease forms.

Coronary artery disease is a narrowing of the small blood vessels that supply blood and oxygen to the heart.

Tapan Chatterjee, PhD, and researchers in the division of cardiovascular diseases at UC found through global gene expression analysis (measurement of the activity of thousands of genes at once) that this outer fat tissue-known as perivascular fat tissue-is different from subcutaneous (beneath the skin) fat tissues in other parts of the body.

Research has previously shown that perivascular fat tissue in humans with coronary artery diseases is highly inflamed, leading to the belief that dysfunctional perivascular fat is the real culprit in the formation of coronary artery diseases.

Chatterjee's team was able to replicate this inflammation in animal models.

Read in | English | Español | Français | Deutsch | Português | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | 简体中文 | 繁體中文 | Nederlands | Русский | Svenska | Polski
Comments
The opinions expressed here are the views of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of News-Medical.Net.
Post a new comment
Post