Adult stem cells can prevent Alzheimer's disease

Published on September 27, 2012 at 12:27 AM · 2 Comments

In the first study of its kind, researchers at Korea's leading university and the RNL Bio Stem Cell Technology Institute announced this week the results of a study that suggests an astounding possibility: adult stem cells may not only have a positive effect on those suffering from Alzheimer's disease, they can prevent the disease. Using fat-derived adult stem cells from humans [scientific term: adMSCs, or human, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells], researchers were able to cause Alzheimer's disease brains in animal models to regenerate.  The researchers, for the first time in history, used stem cells to identify the mechanism that is key to treatment of Alzheimer's disease, and demonstrated how to achieve efficacy as well as prevention of the symptoms of Alzheimer's with adult stem cells, a "holy grail" of biomedical scientists for decades.

Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of dementia (loss of brain function), is the 6th leading cause of death, and affects 1 in 8 people -- more than breast cancer.  As of 2010, there were 35.6 million people with Alzheimer's disease in the world, but this number is expected to double every 20 years.  It is estimated that the total cost of Alzheimer's is US $604 billion worldwide, with 70% of this cost  in the US and Europe.  To put that in perspective, Alzheimer's care costs more than the revenues of Wal-Mart (US$414 billion) and Exxon Mobil (US$311 billion), according to the British World Alzheimer's Report of ADI.  The cost of Alzheimer's is at the top of health economists' list of the disorders of aging that could topple nations' entire economies, and that regularly ruin not only the lives of patients but of their relatives.  

According to the results of this first major study, Alzheimer's may soon be a preventable disease, or even a thing of the past.  Equally important, the safety human administration of the kind of adult stem cells used in this experiment has been established in multiple articles and government-approved clinical trials.  

THE RESEARCH:

The study was jointly led by Seoul National University Professor Yoo-Hun Suh and RNL Bio Stem Cell Technology Institute (SCTI) director Dr. Jeong-Chan Ra.  

The researchers and their teams injected stem cells into mice genetically designed to have the core symptoms and physiology of Alzheimer's disease.  They were able to identify that these human stem cells, derived from adipose tissue, behave in a very special way when injected into the tail vein of mice subjects.  The cells migrated through the blood brain barrier, thought by many to be impossible for adult stem cells to cross, and went into the brain. In fact, fluorescent labeled cells were monitored for distribution in subjects and the team identified that the infused cells migrated throughout the bodies including brain except the olfactory organ, and therefore confirmed that IV infused stem cell can reach to the brain across the blood brain barrier. 

The team infused human adipose stem cells intravenously in Alzheimer model mice multiple times two weeks apart from three month to 10 month. Once there, the mice who received cells improved in every relevant way: ability to learn, ability to remember, and neuropathological signs.  More important, for the first time ever, Alzheimer model mice showed the mediation of IL-10, which is known for anti-inflammation and neurological protection.  

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Comments
  1. HAROLD GONZALEZ HAROLD GONZALEZ United States says:

    Are their any plans for human trails in the very very near future.
    If so where in the NY city are will the trials start,
    Please let me know
    Thanks;
    Harold Gonzalez
    edaris@aol.com

  2. HAROLD GONZALEZ HAROLD GONZALEZ United States says:

    How about the j147 treatment, for Alzheimer's, when will that be available also for human trials.

    Any information you can provide as to when any one os trails and the location where and when they will be conducted will be very much appreciated.
    Thanks;
    edaris@aol.com

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