Myocardial infarction mortality rates decrease by 44% over the last 15 years in Argentina

Published on October 5, 2012 at 4:50 AM · No Comments

Mortality caused by myocardial infarction has decreased by 44% over the last 15 years in Argentina, according to new research which will be presented during the 38th Argentine Congress of Cardiology. The results from the SCAR registry (Registro de Síndromes Coronarios Agudos en Argentina; Argentine Registry of Acute Coronary Syndromes) were presented by Dr Ricardo Villarreal.

The 38th Argentine Congress of Cardiology takes place 5 to 7 October 2012 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The event is organised by the Argentine Society of Cardiology, which is an affiliated member of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). The ESC will present a full day of scientific sessions at the event, on Saturday 6 October, as part of its Global Scientific Activities (GSA) programme. ESC Past-President Michel Komajda will head the European delegation.

Myocardial infarction remains one of the top causes of death in Argentina. According to results from the SCAR registry, the mortality rate of patients hospitalized because of acute myocardial infarction has dropped by 44% in the last 15 years, from 11.3% to 6.4%. The SCAR registry compared data from 733 patients in 47 centres in Argentina that participated in both registries of 1996 and 2011. The analysis was made using identical criteria for the definition of myocardial infarction and coronary risk factors in both registries.

The registry also showed that there were 55% fewer smokers in 2011 compared to 1996. But over that 15 year period there was a 30% increase in patients with high cholesterol levels and a 53% increase in patients with background hypertension.

Dr Villarreal said: "In the last 15 years we have seen a dramatic decrease in smoking in patients admitted for acute myocardial infarction. This coincides with a moderate decrease in smoking habits in Argentina."

In 2011 a higher proportion of patients had previous infarction and coronary interventions (angioplasty and coronary bypass surgery). In 2011 there was also an increase in patients previously treated with aspirin, betablockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and statins.

The study also found a substantial reduction (59%) in mortality in the group of patients that were reperfused. Although there was no increase in the total number of patients who received reperfusion treatment, in eligible patients with ST segment elevation the rate of reperfusion increased from 65% to 85%. There was a higher use of primary or direct coronary angioplasty, aspirin, betablockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and statins.

Dr Villarreal said: "Results from the SCAR registry show that treatment for myocardial infarction in Argentina has improved over the past 15 years, with greater use of recommended treatments and medications. Clinicians should now focus their efforts on facilitating the access of patients with acute myocardial infarction to rapid reperfusion therapy and on extending the benefits of evidence based therapies to all patients."

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