Roitt's Essential Immunology receives BMA Book of the Year Award

Published on October 10, 2012 at 6:12 AM · No Comments

John Wiley & Sons, Inc., today announced that Roitt's Essential Immunology, 12th Edition, has won the prestigious British Medical Association (BMA) Book of the Year Award.

The BMA Medical Book Awards aim to encourage and reward excellence in medical publishing. Prizes are awarded in 21 categories, with the overall Book of the Year selected from the category winners.

Chosen from over 700 published titles, Roitt's Essential Immunology was commended as an excellent example of a modern textbook.

The BMA noted, "This textbook aims to bring readers fully up-to-date with the latest knowledge and concepts about the workings of the immune system. It is praised for its hallmark easy reading style which clearly explains the key principles needed by medical and health science students, in the context of a fully functioning immune system."

The book also won first prize in the Basic and Clinical Sciences section of the awards.

"We and our authors are delighted that this important textbook won such prestigious awards," said Alison Langton, VP and Books Publishing Director, Health Sciences, Wiley. "Over its many editions, Roitt's has been continuously developed by incorporating student and instructor feedback. These honors reinforce its pre-eminent market position worldwide."

Sherlock's Diseases of the Liver and Biliary System, also in its 12th edition, won first prize in the Internal Medicine section as did The Concise Guide to Pediatric Arrhythmias in the Cardiology section.

Fourteen other Wiley titles were also highly commended in the awards.

Source:

John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

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