Investigators provide overview of role of dopamine in modulating the immune system

Published on October 11, 2012 at 11:59 PM · No Comments

Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that is associated with emotions, movement, and the brain's pleasure and reward system. In the current issue of Advances in Neuroimmune Biology, investigators provide a broad overview of the direct and indirect role of dopamine in modulating the immune system and discuss how recent research has opened up new possibilities for treating diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, multiple sclerosis or even the autoimmune disorders.

Dopamine can be synthesized not only in neurons, but also in immune cells which orchestrate the body's response to infection or malignancy. "Data strongly supports the theory that an autocrine/paracrine regulatory loop exists in lymphocytes, where dopamine produced and released by the cells then acts on its own receptors, and can have an influence on its own function," explains lead investigator György M. Nagy, PhD, DSc, of the Department of Human Morphology, Cellular and Molecular Neuroendocrine Research Laboratory, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, and Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary.

Elements of dopamine signaling and metabolites can also serve as a communication interface between the central nervous system and immune system, and that communication can work in both directions. Lymphocytes that can pass the blood brain barrier can be "educated" by locally secreted neurotransmitters, including dopamine. Then they transmit brain-driven messages to other cells of the immune system via direct or indirect pathways.

Permanent dysfunctions of either the central (CNS) or the peripheral (immune) dopaminergic system are frequently associated with immune malfunctions. Current dopamine replacement or receptor blocking therapies are based on the supposed action of these drugs at the target site, and they often only relieve disease symptoms. The mainstream in design of new therapies is to find drugs having more-and-more specific action and minimal or no potential side effects, however, there is always a risk/benefits consideration in the drug development processes. These approaches may need to be revisited with the concepts of neuroimmunomodulatory influence, and focus on the cross-talk between the immune and nervous systems," Dr. Nagy says.

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