Hormone therapy increases risk of heart attack or dying in women with metabolic syndrome

Published on October 31, 2012 at 2:41 AM · No Comments

A new analysis of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) trials show that women who had metabolic syndrome before they started hormone therapy had a greatly increased risk of heart attack or dying of heart disease. Women who didn't have metabolic syndrome beforehand showed no increased risk. The study was published this month online in Menopause, the journal of the North American Menopause Society.

"Our findings emphasize the importance of assessing cardiovascular disease risk status when hormone therapy is considered for relief of menopausal symptoms," wrote the WHI investigators who authored the study.

Metabolic syndrome is a group of risk factors that occur together and increase the risk of heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. They include a large waistline, high blood pressure, high blood glucose or diabetes, high triglycerides, or low HDL-the "good cholesterol." Obesity is the key feature, which predisposes women to the others.

In this analysis, a woman was considered to have metabolic syndrome if she had three of any of the five metabolic syndrome features; 269 women met the criteria when they started the trial and were compared with 695 women who did not have metabolic syndrome.

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