Global health community should save AMFm because it saves lives

Published on November 15, 2012 at 4:05 AM · No Comments

The Affordable Medicines Facility-malaria began as a pilot program in 2010 to "provide a 'co-payment' to the manufacturers of [artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs)], thereby allowing commercial wholesalers and private or government health services to purchase the drugs at a fraction of the already low negotiated price," Kenneth Arrow, a Nobel laureate in economic sciences in 1972 and an emeritus professor of economics at Stanford University, writes in a New York Times opinion piece. The program subsidized ACTs -- a newer, more effective malaria treatment -- to "sell [them] as cheaply as [less-effective] chloroquine in Africa's private pharmacies and shops, where half of all patients first seek treatment for malaria-like fevers," he states. "Strikingly, it has worked," Arrow writes, noting a recent independent review of the program published in the Lancet.

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