Virginia Women's Center to participate in new HPV and cervical cancer vaccine clinical trial

Published on December 4, 2012 at 6:56 AM · No Comments

Virginia Women's Center has been selected to participate in a nationwide clinical trial, one that will ultimately hope to prevent the human papillomavirus virus (HPV) from progressing into cervical cancer and treat women who have HPV and the precancerous lesions associated with it. The Richmond-area OB-GYN practice has participated in over 50 clinical research studies since 1997, all of which have contributed to the future of safe and effective medicine for women.

"We feel honored to be able to participate in this study and to play a role in helping further advance medicine for women," said Dr. Peter Zedler, gynecologist and Director of Clinical Research at Virginia Women's Center. "In addition, we feel fortunate that we can offer this potentially life-saving treatment in our local Richmond community."

Gardasil, the first vaccine developed to prevent HPV, was approved by the FDA in 2006 and is now approved for females and males ages nine to 26. Gardasil protects against four strains of the human papillomavirus (HPV).  In females, Gardasil helps protect against the two types of HPV that cause about 75 percent of cervical cancer cases and two additional types that cause 90 percent of genital warts cases. In males, Gardasil helps protect against 90 percent of genital warts cases. Gardasil is ideally given to patients before they become sexually active. Virginia Women's Center was the only research site in the Richmond area involved in the clinical trial leading the approval of Gardasil.

While the Gardasil vaccine has proven to be a safe and effective preventative vaccine, there is still an opportunity to improve treatment for women who have already been exposed to HPV. Dr. Peter Zedler, and his team are currently enrolling participants in a clinical research study to evaluate the effectiveness of a new vaccine that would treat women who have HPV and the precancerous lesions associated with it. The hope is that the vaccine will stimulate the woman's immune system to fight the precancerous lesions and resolve the process, before it progresses to cervical cancer. Currently, for women who have HPV and precancerous lesions, a surgical procedure that removes the tissue is the only option to keep the disease from progressing to cervical cancer. The vaccine may also serve as an alternative to having this surgical procedure.

Source:

Virginia Women's Center

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