Revised version of UPLIFT proves successful in preventing epilepsy-related depression

Published on December 5, 2012 at 1:55 AM · No Comments

Emory researchers announced results of a new study that has proven successful in the prevention of depression in people diagnosed with epilepsy.

Depression is one of the most common psychiatric disorders in people with epilepsy. It affects between 32 and 48 percent of people with the disease. Depression is known to have more of an impact on quality of life than frequent seizures.

A team of researchers at the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University led a study that applied a revised version of a web- and phone-based method focused on preventing, rather than treating depression.

Led by Nancy Thompson, PhD, MPH, associate professor of behavioral sciences and health education, the study, called Project UPLIFT (Using Practice and Learning to Increase Favorable Thoughts), provides an opportunity for patients to learn depression prevention and stress management skills while incorporating techniques to identify and replace negative thoughts and feelings.

"UPLIFT is based on mindfulness and cognitive therapy. Our findings show that by using this revised version of UPLIFT, we are able to prevent depression, reduce seizures and improve quality of life, all at a relatively low cost," says Thompson. "A further benefit is that the materials are delivered to individuals by telephone or Web, which reduces the health disparities for those with limited mobility or those living in rural areas."

Read in | English | Español | Français | Deutsch | Português | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | 简体中文 | 繁體中文 | Nederlands | Русский | Svenska | Polski
Comments
The opinions expressed here are the views of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of News-Medical.Net.
Post a new comment
Post