Scientists develop MitoFish for in vivo studies of mitochondria transport in nerve cells

Published on December 6, 2012 at 1:33 AM · No Comments

The researchers stress that this new window into the neurodegenerative diseases could not have been opened without combining complementary expertise: from Misgeld's lab, imaging and analysis focused on organelle dynamics; and from Schmid's lab, development of transgenic zebrafish models that are stable enough for long-term study. The first authors of the team's report in the Journal of Neuroscience are Gabriela Plucinska (TUM) and Dominik Paquet (DZNE). The collaboration leaders are linked through participation in the newly established Excellence Cluster SyNergy (Munich Cluster for Systems Neurology), as well as in the DZNE and the Excellence Cluster CIPSM.

"Just talking to each other," Misgeld recalls, "we realized that this would be a perfect match - that she would have situations in which the kind of trafficking question I wanted to look at could be of high relevance, and that she had all the tools we would need to carry this forward."

The driving force, they emphasize, is to understand more about Alzheimer's and other brain diseases to help steer the search for therapies in the right direction. "We need to understand how the machine works before we can operate it," Schmid says, "and modern biology is so technically advanced that no lab can be cutting-edge across the whole range of needed expertise."

Source: Technische Universitaet Muenchen

Read in | English | Español | Français | Deutsch | Português | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | 简体中文 | 繁體中文 | Nederlands | Русский | Svenska | Polski
Comments
The opinions expressed here are the views of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of News-Medical.Net.
Post a new comment
Post