IRMA, Population Council and MTN release Rectal Revolution video project

Published on December 18, 2012 at 12:02 AM · No Comments

International Rectal Microbicide Advocates (IRMA), the Population Council, and the Microbicide Trials Network (MTN) today released a collaborative video project called "The Rectal Revolution Is Here: An Introduction to Rectal Microbicide Clinical Trials." The jointly produced video, the first of its kind, is designed to educate communities affected by HIV about rectal microbicide development and the importance of participating in clinical trials to help speed the search for new HIV prevention options.

"The Rectal Revolution will be an excellent tool for education and recruitment for MTN-017, the first-ever Phase II safety trial of a rectal microbicide planned to launch soon. The video will be particularly useful because it's not protocol-specific and can be used in future rectal microbicide trials as well," said Clare Collins, MTN associate director of communications and external relations and video co-producer.

"There is an engaging mixture of animation and live action with beautiful footage from Thailand, South Africa, Peru, and the United States," Collins continued, "and we showcase interviews with scientists, advocates, and an exceptional rectal microbicide trial participant, Rig Rush, who is both eloquent and entertaining as he shares his personal experience as a study volunteer."

Produced by Paw Print Productions of Cape Town, South Africa, the video is available for viewing now on YouTube in English, Spanish, and Thai.

"This educational video is a groundbreaking tool to recruit volunteers and educate public health leaders for what may be one of the most promising new methods to fight HIV," said co-producer Barbara Friedland, associate in the HIV and AIDS program at the Population Council. "It was developed through an intense consultative process to ensure accuracy and relevance to the communities where this video will be shown," she said.

"We wanted the video to be educational and engaging, and to encourage audiences to get involved in efforts to prevent HIV," Friedland continued."So we worked with an advisory committee comprising staff at rectal microbicide trial sites, scientists, advocates, and other community experts to develop the script. We screened 'rough cuts' of the video with 80 professionals in the field and pre-tested it in 13 focus group discussions with over 100 gay men and transgender women in Thailand, South Africa, Peru, and the United States," she said.

"The insights and wisdom these individuals shared with us were absolutely critical to shaping the final version of the video," said Friedland.

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