News anchor shares experience about link between multiple sclerosis and dental mercury fillings

Published on January 2, 2013 at 8:12 AM · 1 Comment

Nashville news anchor (Fox 17) Stacy Case will share her personal experience about the link between multiple sclerosis (MS) and dental mercury fillings on the January 3rd episode of CBS's The Doctors entitled "Dangerous Toxins."

Case's compelling testimony of recovery from multiple sclerosis includes the safe removal of her mercury fillings by Ada Frazier , Alabama dentist and member of the International Academy of Oral Medicine and Toxicology (IAOMT), as well as detoxifying with the assistance of Tennessee physician Michael Bernui .

Multiple sclerosis is a debilitating illness that attacks the central nervous system of an estimated 2.1 million people worldwide. 

When Case discovered that her inability to walk and other MS symptoms were triggered by her dental mercury fillings, she chronicled her journey to get well.  She was particularly shocked that, like millions of other Americans, she was not aware there was mercury in her teeth.  "It's an injustice not to have been informed," Case explains.            

Dental amalgam fillings, often called "silver," contain approximately 50% mercury, one of the most toxic heavy metals on earth.  Numerous studies from around the world warn of mercury and its link to neurological illnesses such as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer's disease. 

Dr. Boyd Haley , Chemistry Professor Emeritus, University of Kentucky, and Chair of the IAOMT Scientific Advisory Board, will also appear on The Doctors.  Dr. Haley has demonstrated that enormous levels of mercury vapor are released from dental amalgam "silver" fillings.

Another film, "Smoking confirms poisonous mercury vapors are continually emitted from dental amalgam fillings.

While the World Health Organization has concluded that mercury vapor from dental amalgam is the greatest source of human exposure to mercury in non-industrial settings, the National MS Society continues to deny the link between mercury and MS.

Furthermore, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) had warnings posted on its website about dental amalgam mercury which have since been removed, while the American Dental Association (ADA) has endorsed the continued use of dental amalgam.

Yet, dentists in California, Connecticut, Maine, and Vermont are legally required to provide their patients with brochures about their choices for dental fillings.

Whereas U.S. authorities are clearly debating over dental amalgam while citizens like Stacy Case fight to recover from illness, global groups are taking a stance against mercury: Norway, Sweden, and Denmark banned the use of mercury amalgam fillings in dentistry, Germany and Canada limited their use for pregnant women, and France, Finland, and Austria recommended that alternative mercury-free dental materials be used for pregnant women

This month, the United Nations Environment Programme's Intercessional Negotiating Committee will formalize an international mercury treaty.  Annex C, Part II, of the draft treaty includes dental amalgam regulations such as promoting mercury‑free alternatives, discouraging insurance policies that favor dental amalgam, and discouraging use in children, pregnant women and other sensitive populations.

Source:

International Academy of Oral Medicine and Toxicology

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Comments
  1. Marie Flowers Marie Flowers United States says:

    There is a mistake in the comment "Another film, "Smoking confirms poisonous mercury vapors are continually emitted from dental amalgam fillings."

    It should be--Another film Smoking Teeth video confirms poisonous mercury vapors are continually emitted from dental amalgam fillings.

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