Adrenomed creates Adrecizumab to decrease death rates from sepsis

Published on January 3, 2013 at 1:31 AM · No Comments

The German corporation Adrenomed AG today announced its intentions to contribute to the reduction of mortality from sepsis and septic shock. Sepsis is an advanced systemic infection that travels via the blood stream to many of the body's vital organs, which can lead to death and disability.

Adrenomed AG has developed the new first-in-class compound, Adrecizumab. The drug targets the vasoactive hormone adrenomedullin as one of the key mediators during sepsis and septic shock. Adrecizumab is a humanized monoclonal anti-adrenomedullin antibody, which modulates the adrenomedullin bioactivity and has shown to stabilize circulation and renal function in animal models of septic shock.

Adrenomed has already confirmed its preclinical program with scientific advice from the European Medicines Agency – PEI (German Federal Institute for Federal Agency for Vaccines and Biomedicines). The first-in-man clinical Phase 1 study of Adrecizumab is planned for 2015.

"It is our key motivation to reducing the high mortality rates from sepsis," said Dr. Bernd Wegener , CEO of Adrenomed. "Sepsis is a major healthcare problem that affects millions of people worldwide. Deaths from sepsis is greater than mortality of breast cancer, lung cancer, and colon cancer combined." 

"We are excited about our recent results in animal studies," noted Dr. Andreas Bergmann , Chief Scientific Officer of Adrenomed. "Test groups treated with Adrecizumab showed an outstanding increase of survival over a long time period."

Source:

Adrenomed AG

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