Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium to be held from Jan. 24-26 in San Francisco, CA

Published on January 24, 2013 at 4:16 AM · No Comments

New research into the treatment and prognosis of gastrointestinal cancers was released today in advance of the tenth annual Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium being held January 24-26, 2013, at The Moscone West Building in San Francisco, CA.

Five important studies were highlighted today in a live presscast:

Postoperative Treatment with S-1 Chemotherapy Reduces Relapses and Extends Survival in Patients with Pancreatic Cancer: Early results from a Phase III clinical trial conducted in Japan show patients who received the chemotherapy drug S-1 after surgery for Stage I-III pancreatic adenocarcinoma had a 44 percent lower risk of dying compared with patients treated with gemcitabine. While S-1 is not yet approved in the United States, it is available in several Asian and European countries.

New Molecular Classification System for Colorectal Cancer May Help Guide Treatment Choice for Individual Patients: Researchers identified three distinct colorectal cancer subtypes based on gene expression patterns in patients' tumors. The findings may lead to new molecular tests for determining if a patient needs adjuvant treatment and which treatment might be most beneficial.

Surgery Following Imatinib Therapy Substantially Improves Survival for Certain Patients with Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GISTs): A new retrospective study validated the benefit of performing surgery to remove residual tumor lesions after imatinib therapy. Patients who received surgery after imatinib had a 5.5 fold lower risk of dying and a nearly 4-year longer time to disease worsening compared with those who received imatinib alone.

Profiling Gene Expression in Circulating Tumor Cells Shows Promise as a New Prognostic Strategy for Patients with Pancreatic Cancer: A study profiling gene expression in cells shed from pancreatic tumors into the bloodstream detected genomic changes associated with response and resistance to different treatments. This new profiling strategy may help predict whether or not a patient would respond to a particular chemotherapy regimen.

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