Mount Sinai to initiate immunological therapy trial against chronic pulmonary sarcoidosis

Published on January 31, 2013 at 12:54 AM · No Comments

Patients are currently being enrolled in the first clinical trial to investigate the efficacy of immunological therapy for chronic pulmonary sarcoidosis. The trial is being conducted by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

Mount Sinai has the largest Sarcoidosis Service in the world and is one of only two institutions in the country participating in the trial; the other is the University of Cincinnati. Mount Sinai is a National Institutes of Health Center of Excellence for research in sarcoidosis.

"The current standard treatment for chronic pulmonary sarcoidosis is corticosteroids," said Adam Morgenthau, MD, principal investigator of the study and Director of the Sarcoidosis Clinic and the Alvin S. Teirstein Sarcoidosis Support Group at Mount Sinai. "Many patients don't respond to these drugs and those who do often develop long-term complications. We are hopeful this study will lead to new treatments to improve lung function and quality of life."

Sarcoidosis is a rare inflammatory disease that can affect any organ but most commonly involves the lungs. Patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis typically exhibit symptoms of shortness of breath, cough and/or wheeze. It affects men and women of all ages and races worldwide. However, it occurs mostly in people ages 20 to 40, African Americans, especially women, and people of Asian, German, Irish, Puerto Rican and Scandinavian origin, according to the National Institutes of Health.

Read in | English | Español | Français | Deutsch | Português | Italiano | 日本語 | 한국어 | 简体中文 | 繁體中文 | Nederlands | Русский | Svenska | Polski
Comments
The opinions expressed here are the views of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of News-Medical.Net.
Post a new comment
Post