Study identifies regions of genes linked to Beh-et's disease

Published on February 16, 2013 at 12:47 AM · No Comments

Researchers don't know the exact cause of Beh-et's disease, a chronic condition that leads to oral and genital sores and serious complications such as blindness, but new research brings better understanding to what makes some people more susceptible to being affected.

In one of the most extensive genetic analyses of Beh-et's disease, a University of Michigan-led, international team of researchers has identified novel gene variants in the inflammatory disorder and uncovered data that could apply to studies of other diseases. The results appear in the journal Nature Genetics.

"This disease is associated with significant complications and because it is not well understood, treatment options are limited," says lead author Amr Sawalha, M.D., associate professor of internal medicine in the division of rheumatology at the U-M Medical School.

"We were able to identify and localize robust genetic risk factors associated with Beh-et's disease in a way that will hopefully bring us a step closer to better understanding this devastating illness."

The UMHS research, a collaboration that includes researchers from Turkey, Italy, Germany and the Netherlands, identifies how a specific group of genes are linked to Beh-et's disease. The disease can affect people from all ethnicities, but has an increased prevalence along the ancient "Silk Road" in East Asia, Turkey, and the Mediterranean and Middle Eastern countries.

The disorder causes chronic inflammation in blood vessels throughout the body and affects many organs, including the eyes, brain, skin, joints and the digestive system. Some symptoms may include mouth and genital ulcers, eye inflammation and reduced vision, skin rashes and lesions, joint swelling, abdominal pain and diarrhea.

Beh-et's disease may also cause inflammation in the brain, which could cause headaches, fever, poor balance or stroke. Inflammation in veins and large arteries could also lead to other complications, such as aneurysms.

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